The Reasons Why Monitor Mixing Is Better Than FOH Mixing

Some live sound engineers think of it as the halfway house between being a runner and an actual live Front of House (FOH) mixing engineer. For me, monitor mixing is great in its own right. There are certain drawbacks to being way out there by yourself mixing at the FOH position while the monitor mixer…

Some live sound engineers think of it as the halfway house between being a runner and an actual live Front of House (FOH) mixing engineer. For me, monitor mixing is great in its own right. There are certain drawbacks to being way out there by yourself mixing at the FOH position while the monitor mixer is in the middle of the party that's going on onstage. What's the party all about, and why is it so much better to be monitoring than mixing?

Back-stage pass with benefits

You are there smack-dab in the middle of it all by the side of the stage. You're working closely with the band, making sure everything goes smoothly. You're the most important person to that band since they all want to be able to hear themselves well. Like a back-stage pass with benefits since you're just as important to the band as any of their members.

Almost a part of the performance

The most rewarding thing about doing monitor mixing is how you are so involved with the performance. Since you are responsible for making the band sound great onstage you are helping them feeling comfortable and therefore giving a better performance. Helping the band hear themselves better so they play better is hugely rewarding.

More challenging

When you're dealing with 5 members wanting 5 individual mixes from 10 tracks you have a challenge in front of you. Compare that to the FOH engineer that just needs to worry about making that main mix sound great and you could say that the monitor mixing engineer's job is much harder. It's certainly a challenge to mix 5 mixes at a time, and if you are dealing with multiple bands every night it becomes even more complex. So it's definitely more challenging to keep track of things on the monitor side of mixing.

You make the band happy

Working with a group of artists is very entertaining. Being in the middle of the action, making sure everyone sounds great on stage makes the band happy. It's very gratifying to get mutual respect from gifted artists. Make the band happy by being a good monitor mixing engineer and you will gain the respect of the band and a reputation for being good at what you do.

Conclusion

Monitor mixing should not be looked at as a compromise on your way to bagging that FOH gig. It's a great job on its own and has some advantages to it that FOH mixing does not. Being in the middle of things, dealing with the artists and making them happy is all a part of the program when you're backstage fixing their mixes.

Instrumental Hip Hop Beats for Record Label Success

Before you begin to download instrumental hip hop beats, there are some important key factors to take into consideration when seeking record label success. One key question you must ask yourself is your sound sound professional, and more over do you sound professional? You must be brutally honest with yourself to take every necessary measure…

Before you begin to download instrumental hip hop beats, there are some important key factors to take into consideration when seeking record label success. One key question you must ask yourself is your sound sound professional, and more over do you sound professional? You must be brutally honest with yourself to take every necessary measure in introducing the record industry with what they are looking for? Buying musical backing products online to support your lyrical and performance style, and to include as part of your demo presentation can either make or break you as an artist or producer. The success of getting signed by a major record label with instrumental hip hop beats weighs heavily on you presenting yourself as a professional, ready for business and taking on the demanding role of a signed artist.

But first here is a brief and general definition for those seeking clarification. Instrumentals are pre-recorded music compositions that can also contain backing or even load vocal phrases or hook lines. Sites where you can download these products are selling them in relation to music production that is what the title suggests. These pre-recorded audio compositions are used primarily to record or perform live rap or vocal melodies over. In fact, much of what is heard on popular radio today is music composed using a combination on variations of sampled and looped music, as well as instrumental hip hop beats.

When getting hooked on a song, people tend to listen to the music and melody first and the lyrics some time later. If the beat of the song moves them, and the melody line, regardless of the lyrics, inspires their emotions and sparks their imagination, they become hooked on the song. Only after hearing the song repeatedly do most people begin to pick out the lyrics to fully understand what the song is about and then memorizing the words to sing along to.

With this in mind, any producer or artist looking for record label success as a professional needs to consider their instrumental hip hop beats with extreme detail, and when it comes to searching for material online, one must download audio products that are catchy, original and that speak to their audiences sense of emotion and feelings in regard to rhythm and movement. Knowing your audience puts you in a position of authority on what will move and motivate them to follow you, so convincing an A & R rep or record label executive to sign you to their label and to invest in your talent and recording career.

This brings us back to the question, do you sound professional? There are countless sites selling non-exclusive, royalty free instrumental hip hop beats that are easy to download and use as part of, or the entirey of a musical backing to a song, but all are not created equal and some of what is out there will not be suitable or appropriate for your particular style. When you do find something that you're comfortable and confident will add to and support your flow of rap or vocal hooks and melody lines, then stop! Do not begin to download just yet. Take a short break and come back to it after a few moments of allowing yourself to get into the mindset of extreme scrutiny. Take a real good listen to the professionalism and quality of the audio you are interested in and ask yourself, “does it sound professional?” If it is lacking in any way then it will reflect in the overall production and professional quality of your song and you as the artist.

You have the talent. You believe in yourself. Invest in your career wisely as a professional recording artist by taking the time to download instrumental hip hop beats that truly move and inspire you, and that sit nicely as support to your lyrical flow. Remember, a great beat can help in gaining you major record label success.

RnB Beats – Generate Record Label Interest

More then ever, artists are using RnB beats to progress their productivity of composing new songs and to generate record label interest as professionals in the field of music production. It is quite often that through downloading original material an artist can launch their career, and become successful within the music industry. But with an…

More then ever, artists are using RnB beats to progress their productivity of composing new songs and to generate record label interest as professionals in the field of music production. It is quite often that through downloading original material an artist can launch their career, and become successful within the music industry. But with an ever increasing number of sites catering to downloadable products, it's easy to find ones self spending countless hours trawling the net for something of outright originality, produced with the highest quality of record industry standards and that is suitable for the particular idea or theme of the song to be supported.

Before downloading RnB beats, artists should first take time in defining their own style and have a clear picture of what they are trying to create. To generate record label interest weighs heavily on artists coming to the table with a complete package ready to go. What this means is that if your are serious about getting signed and launching your recording career, then you must be ready to present yourself with a clearly defined style of your own that is supported by your unique song writing skills, matched with the dynamics of professionally recorded, mixed and mastered tracks of your demo. All of this then has to be presented with undeniable evidence that you and your music are what people are looking for.

Let's focus on your vocal flow and style of singing or rapping over RnB beats to generate record label interest. Now you as the artist must become objective and listen to your music, along with the flow and style of your voice and how the two work together. Take great care in not getting cooked up in your performance, but in picking out the small details of your vocal phrasing and timing, accents and inflections you might tend to put on certain words and so on. Dissect your music and the relation of your vocals with it. This is required research into you as an artist and defining with complete certyty your creative style of vocal performance.

Another step to take in generating record label interest with RnB beats is to listen only to material that unmistakably supports your style, and that complements your flow of singing or rapping. What you decide on will need to match your vocal talent and not fight against your natural rhythm. Listen carefully to any percussive, chord or melodic elements that might work against your vocal arrangement and others that will help to carry your vocals and give relevance to what you are creating musically. Only after you have identified the sites and products that cover all the basses, including but not limited to professional production quality, unique and originality in composition and working well with your style, do you consider proceeding to download RnB beats.

Once you have narrowed down your products, you may need to do further editing for them to suit your music arrangement. For this reason you will want to be sure that the downloadable format works with your DAW (digital audio workstation). Other critical information to be aware of when deciding on which sites you will buy from are things like what are their licensing agreement details, are they offering exclusive or non-exclusive rights, and what is best for your particular situation? Ask yourself if the material offered on the site stands up to modern day production and if any of the material being sold could be potential club and radio hits? Keep in mind that you are a professional working to generate record label interest, so work with professionals and only download RnB beats that are of professional quality and standards.

Most recording artists will never take these vital steps of empowering themselves with knowledge for escalating their music careers. Set yourself above others by taking your time and being patient with yourself. After all, this is business, and to be a serious contender in the music business you must see yourself as not only the artist, but also representing yourself as the marketing director who has a very defined understanding of the product to be sold to the masses , which is your image and your music. Follow these tips to generate record label interest with your RnB beats.

Making It in the World of Niche Genre Bands

In the good old days bands were “discovered”. Whilst playing at a local dive bar one could be assured that lurking in the shadowy part of the back-room was a millionaire music producer just itching to make your band the next Zeppelin. Unfortunately this simply does not happen anymore. With the proliferation of social media…

In the good old days bands were “discovered”. Whilst playing at a local dive bar one could be assured that lurking in the shadowy part of the back-room was a millionaire music producer just itching to make your band the next Zeppelin. Unfortunately this simply does not happen anymore. With the proliferation of social media and online marketing, record producers and companies no longer need to scout for talent. In fact, it has become requisite that the talent must first prove themselves worthy, likely to provide sales, through the number of “likes” they get on Facebook, or the number of views their video has on YouTube, and so on.

For the more extreme genres this has proved to be an almost fatal roadblock. If you happen to be in a band that does not have a huge local following your chances of making an impact through these medium are slim. Nowhere else is this more true than in the various heavy rock and metal genres. If your band does not have a large social circle of friends with similar tastes, the battle to develop a fan base is going to require much work. This article explains in more detail how that could have been achieved.

There are a huge variety of heavy rock and metal genres, but they all have one thing in common: small niche audio. Metal is very much an acquired taste and none of the target audience cares if you look good or have financial backing. So the standard promotional avenues open to pop music and other genres are very much closed to those of you doomed to have an ear for only the dark music.

However, there are a number of key tips for “making it” in the underground world of heavy music:

It's who you know
The music industry is so overwhelmed with potential talent that the money-people need a way to filter the good investments from the bad. To this end there are certain people who have created for themselves a foothold in this position. Within the world of heavy music, these are the people who organize larger shows, bringing international bands to events, and decide who gets to do what in the industry.

Due to the competitive metal market – small niche audience with large numbers of bands – these people are few and far between, so there is likely to be only one for your area. To make it as a band locally this person is by far the most important opportunity available to you. Find out who they are and then put a plan together to get their attention. Remember that these people are accused with band after band claiming that they are the best. What will make your band stand out is professionalism, dedication, on-going improvement, and a willingness to make that person's life easier.

Tour
Get around the country even if you have to sleep in vans, eat only ketchup, and sell vital organs to make it work. Bands that do not leave their hometown are not taken seriously by those with the power to make them successful. Even just a few states and cities will make a huge impact. Ensure to make this known on your social media sites and websites as well.
You should start putting together a documented resume of your performances, tracking your travels and shows. This will allow you to prepare an impressive promotional package which proves that with or without label-backing, your band is willing to do what it takes to get out there and play as often as possible.

Be prepared to pay for your first album
You will not get sponsored to record your first album when you play in a metal band, period. You should be expecting to finance at least your first album, and quite likely your second. This is another example of how your band will prove that you are worth backing. When it comes to recording and producing, you will very likely get what you pay for.

Ask around other bands to find out who does local records, then go and listen to those. Choose a few that are best suited to your sound and then find out pricing. A quick tip: for your first album at least, agree on a price per song rather than paying by the hour. Most producers are notoriously slow when paid based on time, but if you can make a “half now – half on delivery” type agreement you should get your best results.

Do not forget that often mixing and mastering can be done via the internet, so you can spend the same money on a recognized and respected company or person than you would on local talent. Then you can add that well-known name to your album to give it more street-cred.

Interact with your audience and supporting bands
Local metal supporters are highly influenced by how they feel about the band members personally. Take the time to socialize with everyone who made the time to come to your gig. They will come again if they enjoy your company – everyone likes to be friends with the band!

Always aim to support bands that are doing better than yours rather than trying to headline gigs. This will enable you to move up through the invisible but very real ranks of underground music. To be a great support act that bands will want to invite to future shows, ensure that you aim to:

  • Be on time, quick to set up and pack down
  • Be willing to provide / share gear
  • Be friendly, easy to work with, non-demanding about reimbursement
  • Bring a crowd, even a few that came because of you will be noticed

    Make a music video
    You can get a decent video done for anywhere between $ 800 and $ 5000. Try to branch out from the tired old “guys dressed in black playing in an abandoned house” routine. You could achieve this by adding some humor and playfulness to the video. And enjoy yourself! Making a music video will be one of the highlights of your life if you put the effort into it.

    A video is also probably the most effective medium to promote your work. It can easily be uploaded to social media sites, and if it is of decent quality, most local rock and metal late-night TV shows will be happy to air it for free. Many bands do not get to this stage, and promoters know this, so it is yet another way of showing professionalism and dedication among a sea of ​​unreliable, lazy musicians.

    The obvious theme in the above advice is about how professional you are, or at least appear to be. Those with the power in the music industry have deal with talent for so long that they are worn out by wannabes, no-hopers, laziness and false promises. Your band needs to deliver what they want, and you need to be able to prove you can do this. Do not expect hand-outs – you are not in that sort of genre. You must earn your place, promote yourself, and become a desirable group to work with.

    It helps if your music is good too … did I mention that?

    Cheers for reading. Rock on!
    Dan

  • The Fuel of Excellence: Drinking Water – A Musician’s Guide to Handling Thirst for Optimal Hydration

    “The person who eats fruits, green and succulent vegetables, and avoids condiments and has his drinking drinking habit, will have little cause for drinking at any time and no cause for drinking at meal time or immediately thereafter. will suffer therefrom. I can insure him that it will improve and quickly at that. ” Dr.…

    “The person who eats fruits, green and succulent vegetables, and avoids condiments and has his drinking drinking habit, will have little cause for drinking at any time and no cause for drinking at meal time or immediately thereafter. will suffer therefrom. I can insure him that it will improve and quickly at that. “

    • Dr. Herbert Shelton

    Introduction

    As part of talking about proper food combining I thought it would be important to share some insights about proper water take with you. In this article, I plan to describe to you some of the knowledge and techniques that I now use to achieve optimal hydration. Because the human body is almost entirely made up of water, it's important to know how to properly hydrate without falling victim to over- or under-saturation. In my experience and in my studies I've found it challenging to arrive at just the right balance with water intake and food consumption. In the past I've made the all-to-common mistake of drinking water with my meals and suffering with consequences such as heartburn, acid reflux, and indigestion.

    As artists, these consequences are difficult to live with especially during performances and when they act as deterrents to focusing our attention to these conditions instead of to our creative efforts. So it's my hope that this information will help illuminate an essential area of ​​your life and good health – optimal water intake.

    Habitual Drinking

    So let's start with the idea of ​​drinking 6 – 8 glasses of water a day. Habitual drinking, like habitual eating, is a bad idea in that if consumption is not based on need, then there really is not any reason for it. Drinking water or any other hydrating liquid should be dictated according to thirst. Thirst can be defined as the biological or physiological need for water. So in my experience I've found it's best to avoid routine drinking. Water needs vary with the seasons, activity, age, gender, and climate, so there is no sound reason to medically or nutritionally advise anyone to drink any quantity of water without first knowing something about them and their condition.

    Experiments with plants have shown that super-saturation of their protoplasm weakens and even kills them. Similarly, when large quantities of water are taken in by man or animal it produces a state not like that of alcoholic inoxication. Excessive water drinking weakens the tissues, dilutes essential bodily fluids, decreases the power of the blood to carry oxygen, and lessens the vitality of the cells.

    Ruining Digestion with Water

    Excessive water intake also ruins the digestive process by washing away the very enzymatic secretaries needed to break down food in the mouth (from mastication and insalivation) and stomach. Often we drink large quantities of water just before or with our meals so that what results from the little secretions that remain are fermentation throughout the digestive tract (gas, heartburn, etc.) and poor nutrition (undigested or unprocessed food).

    Drinking with meals and excess water drinking are both known to stimulate the appetite, which is caused by an irritation of the stomach and not by true hunger. This creates a vicious cycle where in general a person eats meals that stimulate a false thirst, which they then respond to by drinking large amounts of water or other beverages (that are really foods or poisons). This in turn washed away the very digestive enzymes manufactured by the body for digestion, thereby encouraging fermentation in the intestinal tract, leading to uncomfortable pressure in the abdomen, heartburn, gas, frequent bowels, and other related conditions.

    The horror of this cycle to the health of the individual can be further simplified as a cycle of feeding false hunger and false thirst. Eating too many foods that stimulate false thirst, and drinking too much water that leads to a stimulating of the appetite with a false hunger will both rob the artist and creative type of their vital energies, which they willfully need for their work.

    Therefore, it's best to abstain from drinking with your meals and to reduce your water intake to match physiological demand. No matter what is eaten, as long as it's edible, the glands of the mouth will supply sufficient quantities of digestive fluids if allowed to do so. And as you've read drinking water with meals before the digestive fluids from doing the work they were designed to do.

    How to Drink Your Water

    According to the school of Natural Hygiene, the safest rule on water consumption is “drink as little as a thirst demands.” Other than this there is no hard and fast rule for water drinking. Similarly, there is no absolute rule for how much one bought to eat, breathe, sleep, or have sex. So what does this mean and how is this supposed to help you?

    The intent behind this rule is to get you to listen to your body's need for water. My personal experience with Natural Hygiene and food combining has included the painstaking process of breaking bad eating and drinking habits borne from years of thoughtless and indiscriminate consumption. As many people are habitual overeaters, similarly these same people habitually super saturate them by drinking too much water. The main reason why we drink too much water has to do with ignoring our body's cues for water intake which is dictated by need, as opposed to irritation or false thirst caused by bad foods or bad combinations of food.

    A false thirst is a demand for water that is caused by eating salt, spices, condiments, greasy dishes, concentrated foods, meat, eggs, cheese, and sugar, all of which cause irritations typically deemed to be thirst. A false thirst usually follows a meal whenever the food is salty, greasy, or full of condiments and spices. This should be ignored, allowing the saliva and stomach secrets to do their work on the food in an attempt to minimize the effect these foods have on the stomach lining and intestinal tract.

    In addition, to the “rule” given above it is also safe to drink 15 – 20 minutes before meals, only a little 2 – 3 hours after a starch meal, and simply a small amount 3 – 4 hours after a protein meal.

    5 Personal Recommendations for Optimal Hydration

    For all intents and purposes all forms of purified water are preferred over tap water. Tap water can easily be classified as a poison because of all the deadly chemicals and dangerous substances, which are added to it in an effort to make it safe for contact with man and animals. Because of this water filtration is of the highest necessity for the health conscious artist and creator.

    So whether you prefer particular brands of water or enjoy the trip to your local water dispensary, or if you like the way distilled, Kangen, or high pH water makes you feel, go ahead and use whatever type or brand of water works well for you . The point of this article was not to get you to change the type of water you drink, instead it's been to help educate you about water intake, maintaining excellent hydration, and balancing these two factors with proper food combining for optimum nutrition.

    Now here are 5 suggestions to help you control your water consumption for improved digestion and excellent hydration.

    1) The best form of water comes from a diet in which there is an abundant intake of fresh fruits and vegetables. With such an abundant of fresh fruits and vegetables in one's diet, the need for water is almost non-existent. Ideally, the only drink you should have is pure water. Most other fluids commonly referred to as drinks are either foods or poisons. For example, fruit and vegetable juices are foods, while alcohol and coffee are poisons.

    2) In order to avoid drinking too much water, try measuring your water intake in terms of mouthfuls, instead of in ounces, cups, or other arbitrary measurements unrelated to the size of your body. In other words, try to stop focusing on the amount of water you drink and instead focus on your body's demand for water. Aside from those of us who have medical conditions that require a high fluid intake, a healthy person is in no danger of dehydration from reducing their water consumption as a drinkable water source is never far from sight.

    3) Another way to reduce your intake properly to your activity, age, gender, and climate is to use small cups or glasses. This will encourage you to ingest smaller amounts of water before, after, or in between meals, while slowing your intake at the same time.

    4) And remember the “rule” on timing your water intake. It is safe to drink water 15 – 20 minutes before meals, little more 2 – 3 hours after a starch meal, and some more 3 – 4 hours after a protein meal. Before you are able to precisely time your water consumption, a preliminary step for you might be to start drinking your water before and between your meals, but never during.

    5) Try to avoid meals with foods that are salty, greasy, or full of condiments and spices. If this is not possible, then rinse your mouth out with water soon after such a meal. This will help dissolve the remaining sugar and salt granules and dilute substances such as vinegar, milk solids, corn syrup, artificial colors and sweeteners, chili powder, and powdered cheeses, all of which are common in most familiar snacks and fast foods. Oftentimes a false thirst psychologically tricks us into drinking more water than we need because food additives cause the mouth to dry.

    Conclusion

    Obviously, we are a thirsty nation, although it seems there's nothing on the market that can quench our thirst. It's no wonder that the beverage industry has experienced its massive growth in recent years. But for most people it's a mystery why there's such a huge market for beverage manufacturers to sell to. However, the mystery is easily dispelled when a little research can tell you that in many instances drink makers are also snack manufacturers. No, I do not think it's a conspiracy, but simply a coincidence that makes dollars and cents for companies that were smart enough to see the relationship between consuming sweet, salty, spicy snacks and the resulting thirst eating such “foods” produces.

    Relax! Recording Vocals Is Easy

    WHAT. EVER. Do not worry about every little technicality when recording vocals. Just make sure everyone is comfortable and loving what they are doing. However – in all seriousness – if something is lacking in the vocal department the song can lose momentum and weight. So what to do then? How 'bout some tips? 1.…

    WHAT. EVER.

    Do not worry about every little technicality when recording vocals. Just make sure everyone is comfortable and loving what they are doing. However – in all seriousness – if something is lacking in the vocal department the song can lose momentum and weight.

    So what to do then?

    How 'bout some tips?

    1. Make sure he's comfortable singing

    First and foremost, make sure he can sing. There's nothing worse than trying to squeeze a super performance out of a subpar singer. He will most likely stay in the vocal booth all day trying to squeeze out notes that are not right for him. This makes him uncomfortable and it sounds like shit to you. Make sure he can sing and feels comfortable singing before you hit record. It will save a lot of time.

    2. Recording vocals with the right microphone

    Sometimes a different microphone can make all the difference to a singer. His voice may sound dull and uninteresting on the last microphone you used, but on that new one you have not tried before his vocals suddenly shine and cut through like never before.

    If you have extra mics lying around, be sure to test them, even though they might be less expensive, or god forbid a dynamic! And if you do not have extra mics to use, maybe you could spend some money on renting out a few quality mics to try out. Consider it an investment. Recording vocals with a great mic gives that extra sweetness to a song.

    3. Position the mic correctly

    Just like any other recording recording, you have to place your microphone correctly. Make sure the singer is not standing too closely as this gives the vocal a low end boost called the proxy effect. However, if you need a little extra low end and then you should definitely make it sing as close as possible to the microphone.

    But if you want a different sound, experiment with different positions of both the singer and the mic before you decide which way you want to cut it. Making him sing farther away gives a different sound, and making him sing sideways gives another result. Experiment until you are satisfied.

    4. Get a pop filter

    This is an essential tool in recording vocals. A pop filter eliminates plosives like the “p” sounds from a singer. P sounds have more energy and tend to be harder to deal with, if not downright impossible without the use of a pop filter. You can eliminate most of the plosives by tying a pencil or a pen vertically down over the front of the microphone. The pencil diverts the plosives resulting in a very effective budget strategy.

    5. Eliminate background noise and unwanted acoustics.

    Kill your room acoustically if it's a horrible sounding room to begin with. If you are recording vocals in a good sounding, acoustically treated room, make sure there are not any unwanted noises. This can be from the computer that might be humming in the background or background noise from the street.

    Make sure your room is dead and quiet before you record, because there is nothing worse than hearing some unwanted noise in the middle of your greatest vocal take.

    6. Do not be afraid to do punch-ins

    Some vocalist can get through a vocal track in one take. One take and they are done and gone. But most singers take a little while longer, with some versa or sentences being better than others.

    You can either compile the best vocal take from various run throughs, or you can punch the vocalist in multiple times until every phrase is great.

    With a little editing it will sound like a magical singer completely dominating his vocal track.

    Conclusion

    Keep these tips in mind next time you are recording vocals and see if you can not squeeze a little more magic out of your melody. Help the page going by stumbling this to your friends or sharing the page on Twitter or Facebook using the box below! Every little bit counts!

    If You Record An Album And No One Ever Hears It, Did It Make A Sound?

    OK, first off a lot of you are thinking … “Album” what the heck is he talking about? All right, let's call it a Mix Tape, EP, CD or whatever floats your boat. What does it mean if “no one” ever hears your work? Perhaps “no one” is a bit too literal – since you've…

    OK, first off a lot of you are thinking … “Album” what the heck is he talking about? All right, let's call it a Mix Tape, EP, CD or whatever floats your boat.

    What does it mean if “no one” ever hears your work? Perhaps “no one” is a bit too literal – since you've obviously heard it, and the people who helped you record it, and maybe even some family and friends.

    But by “no one” I'm really talking about “everyone” in large enough numbers to begin to justify the effort and expense of the endavor to begin with. Now, for those of you who record and make your music available simply for the joy of doing so and could care less about how many people wind up listening, this obviously does not apply to you. I'm talking to those who go through the additional expense of doing what it takes to make the music available – which includes physical and digital distribution efforts.

    Now, some of these plays into the idea of ​​expectations, and which those expectations are reasonable. Did we expect to sell one million downloads, one hundred thousand CD's, or have a top 40 hit? As an independent artist, those may be pretty lofty expectations, and could fall into the realm of unreasonable. This does not mean that you should not aim high.

    However, none of the above can ever take place if “no one” ever hears you. And to have a “prayer” of achieving anything close to those expectations, you'll need to be heard by significant large numbers of listeners.

    It's great that the playing field has been leveled by the Internet and the digital revolution. Just about everyone can create some music and make it available. It's unleashed a tremendous amount of creativity. And wonderful music along with some not so wonderful music can be found everywhere.

    But this dynamic also makes it more difficult to be heard. Now, you may be thinking, well “it's not a problem as long as your music does not suck”. And you could be right. But I think that many of you reading this believe that you have some really great music, but also if you're reading this it probably means that your music has not been heard as much as you would like it.

    So, how do you access this hurdle? How do you manage to stand out in a literal sea of ​​other talented artists all essentially shouting “hey, listen to me!” Well, if I had a nice simple answer to that, I would package it as a subscription web site and charge everyone $ 19.95 for it and retire a billionaire (then I would release my Albums for free and not care if “any one” ever listened to them).

    But I think a big part of the answer is finding a way to shout “hey, look at me!” differently than the next person. And even more importantly is finding a way to answer the question “why should the listener care about you?” If you develop spelling answers for those two issues, you'll be well on your way to scaling any expectations you set for yourself.

    Online Music Promotion Advice and Things To Avoid

    It's all about internet promotion. I've really focused a lot of my time this past year on how I can get some online presence. That online presence has helped me get fans from all over the country and the world. It did not happen overnight though. I had a lot of trial and error going…

    It's all about internet promotion. I've really focused a lot of my time this past year on how I can get some online presence. That online presence has helped me get fans from all over the country and the world. It did not happen overnight though. I had a lot of trial and error going through the whole process. I'm not a master at it by any means, but I'm definitely much further along when I first started.

    You just have to dive into it and start learning and making mistakes. The best thing that I did was I learned from the mistakes of others. So many internet marketers have made the same mistakes over and over and I'm no different.

    Doing Too Much

    This is my biggest character flaw. I put too much on my plate. There is so much out there when it comes to promoting on the internet. Almost too much! This is where some musicians fail because they try and handle everything. They have 15 different online music accounts, and they are all thinned out.

    There's only so much time in the day and you can not do it all. Instead of having 10 different music accounts and trying to spread yourself thin, focus on 2 or 3 and make it work with that.

    I personally only focus on 3 or 4 main social media accounts. I use Facebook, Twitter, YouTube. I have not used my Reverb Nation page, but I think I might start doing that soon.

    List of social media sites

    Here are some other social media sites that are gaining popularity. I'll probably try one of these sooner or later. There are tons of other social media sites, but these are just a short list of the popular ones.

    • Pinterst
    • Instagram
    • Flickr
    • Foursquare
    • Google+
    • Last.fm
    • LinkedIn
    • Pure Volume
    • Reverb Nation
    • SoundCloud
    • StumbleUpon
    • Digg

    Using a Social Media Management System

    With all these choices of social networks, it's almost a part time job trying to update your status on all these accounts. I used to have a post on Facebook, then copy and paste the same posting to my FB fan page, and then paste it into my Twitter account, and then paste it again … it was so time consuming!

    That's why you need to start looking into a social media management system. There are a lot of them out there, but I personally use a company called Hootsuite.

    Here is what Hootsuite will do for you:

    • Manage multiple social profiles
    • Schedule messages and tweets
    • Track brand mentions
    • Analyze social media traffic
    • Free quick reports

    And the best thing is that Hootsuite is FREE! I downloaded it on my iPhone and it has cut down my work on social media in half. The free account will only manage up to 5 accounts, but if you have a Twitter, Facebook profile and Facebook fan page then you still have 2 more accounts left.

    Here is a list of other social media sites you can manage with the free Hootsuite:

    • LinkedIn
    • Google+
    • FourSquare
    • Myspace
    • WordPress

    Get Educated

    If you do not understand, then do not give up. Educate yourself and do some research. We live in the age of Google, YouTube, and forums. I guarantee that whatever question you have about online music promotion has been asked or has been written about. Looking up blogs and watching YouTube videos is the perfect way to learn how to use any social media, how to market yourself, etc …

    Want to know the best way to learn and get information fast?

    Just ask. The great thing about the internet is it is all about connection. People out there like to help people and want to help each other out. So just ask and you'd be surprised at what you can learn.

    Practice Patience

    So you started promoting your music on your Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and whatever you want to use and then you wait and then nothing. You send out one tweet and no one responses. You only have 9 followers and no one seems to care. Do not give up yet!

    It takes time. I'm sure you've heard the saying that “Rome was not built in a day”. Well, it's the same thing with your internet presence. It takes time to grow and make that connection with people. It does not happen with one posting or one video. It's a collection of doing the small things right and it builds up over time.

    Think of it as a garden. You can not just plant a seed and walk away. You have to water daily. Pick out the weeds. You have to tend to your garden. I'm sure you've heard the saying “Grass is greener on the other side”. Well it's probably because other person takes care of their grass!

    When you put time and effort into something you will see it grow and develop over time … guaranteed. It just will not happen in a day or a week. Sometimes it takes months to get the ball rolling, but one day after all the hard work it will pile up and the momentum will be amazing!

    Be Consistent and Persistent

    Like anything in your business, it will take time to grow. No business can expect to put a couple hours of work into something and then give up because it does not work for them in the first month.

    The internet is here to stay. You could be one of those guys that are just old school and posting your flyer around town so the local people can see it or you can learn how to master the internet tools that are given to you. With a few clicks of the button and a good following you can spread the word about your new single, video or Kickstarter to thousands of people around the globe!

    Tailor Your Internet Marketing to Your Likes and Needs

    There are some general rules in internet marketing that should be followed but when it comes to the methods of marketing your music then it's all up to you. Learn the basics first and what is common practice. Jump into it and just start going at it. Make your mistakes. Learn what you like and what you do not like.

    Some people are all about blogging. Some musicians strictly strictly on YouTube. Some are all about Facebook and twitter. It's all about you and what you like. Find out what you like the most and master that.

    Marketing your music online and making a connection with new people is exciting and fun. This should not be a daunting task. When I work on a music video, upload it and someone from England says they like it and they become a fan, then that is what makes it all worth it. Now if you hate shooting videos and do not like being in front of the camera, then maybe YouTube is not for you.

    I hope that this has helped in some way. These are things that I've learned along the way. They may or may not apply to you. Again, it's all about you and you can promote your music anyway you want. Just stop stalling and do it. Start making those mistakes and getting those fans!

    How To Mix When You’ve Got Over 100 Tracks

    Veteran recording engineer and producer, Jim Pavett, recently finished mixing Jack Gladstone's latest record in Tucson, Arizona. The mammoth album, titled Native Anthropology, wound up with over 130 tracks to be mixed down. Drawing on his wealth of experience, Jim managed to create a compelling and aurally exciting mix combining the standard setup of bass,…

    Veteran recording engineer and producer, Jim Pavett, recently finished mixing Jack Gladstone's latest record in Tucson, Arizona. The mammoth album, titled Native Anthropology, wound up with over 130 tracks to be mixed down. Drawing on his wealth of experience, Jim managed to create a compelling and aurally exciting mix combining the standard setup of bass, drums, guitar and vocals, along with several eclectic instruments such as the Bouzouki, huge choral arrangements, keyboards and string sections.

    I had the opportunity to ask him a few questions about his huge mixing project.

    Faced with so many instruments, where did you start with a mix like this?

    Well, I started with creating the foundation. I made sure the drums, bass guitar and other leading rhythm factors sounded tight and powerful. Only after I did that I start adding in the additional instruments and arrangements.

    Adding in so many tracks must create a lot of clutter in the mix?

    When adding so many tracks, you must take into account that although you're adding tracks to the mix you can not add more weight. Which usually means being careful with the low end.

    So in effect, you are adding more instruments but being careful to cut the low end as well?

    Yes and no. Even though we were adding more instruments and trying to not add extra weight, we also had to be careful about not ripping the body off either. We could not have a 130 track arrangement that's so airy in the high end that the low end and bottom just sound distant and weak.

    With that many tracks, how did you create space for all of them?

    For this particular mix I used an EMT 140 plate reverb from Universal Audio to create most of the space around the instruments. I was able to push all the tracks and instruments in place using the reverb. It's very vintage sounding and its character really helps acoustic instruments soften up and blend well in a mix.

    That's an interesting way to use a reverb. Do you have any extra anecdotes from the session you would like to share?

    When we were mixing 'The Story of Private Charlow', which is this ten and a half minute song with all sorts of tracks, narration and sound effects, we decided we wanted to add some extra power to one of the parts. Since we did not have any guitars on that particular part we came up with the brilliant idea of ​​distorting the cello part. It added such a distinct character to the mix and sounded absolutely amazing. It just goes to show that you should consider everything when it comes to mixing.

    Try everything and see what works then?

    Absolutely. Sometimes things work well in a mix. Sometimes they do not.

    That's great advice. Thanks for your time and information.

    Thank you.

    Jim Pavett is an experienced studio / live drummer, recording engineer, producer & clinician. Exposed to music his whole life, he is a 20+ year veteran of the recording industry.

    Little Known Ways to Add Punch to Your Drum Sound

    How else are people going to notice? Beginners often struggle with making their drums sound punchy and powerful but do not know where to start or how to accomplish that tight produced drum sound that they hear in their head (or on other records.) A few different techniques can be used when you just can…

    How else are people going to notice?

    Beginners often struggle with making their drums sound punchy and powerful but do not know where to start or how to accomplish that tight produced drum sound that they hear in their head (or on other records.) A few different techniques can be used when you just can not seem to figure out how to make that drum track sound great.

    Limiting the snare

    The snare is the back-beat of the drum sound. So obviously it must be given a lot of attention when mixing. A weak and thin snare just results in a fluffy sound that is unusable and lame compared to the rest of the instruments. Getting a punchy snare sound can be achieved with compression, but if you want to take your snare drum even further you should try a limiter instead. If you are not working with a particular dynamic snare track you can push the limiter pretty hard, therefore increasing the overall volume of the track and its punchiness.

    Compressing the overheads

    Use compression to lift up the overall volume of the drum-kit. Make it stand out more with added punch. You do run the risk of increasing the room sound and the noise floor by compressing a lot, but whatever. Sometimes a nice compression push on the overheads can elevate the drum sound in the mix.

    Buss compression

    Buss compression, parallel compression or the “New York Compression Trick” gives your drums a powerful sound without compromising the dynamics of the drummer's playing. By copying your drum tracks via sends and applying powerful compression on the copied tracks you can get the best of both worlds: natural playing with a powerful sound.

    Drum replacement

    Of course, when all else fails and you just can not get any of the drum mixing tricks to work you might need to resort to drum replacement. Drum replacement is used when you are either working with really shitty sounding tracks that no amount of mixing can save them or you want to enhance and accent the pre-recorded drum tracks with samples. The latter is used a lot in modern music production in order to retain a human feel to drum tracks that are sometimes made to sound like electronic loops.

    What's the Rest Then?

    There are an abundance of different mixing techniques you can use to make your drums sound better. Familiarize yourself with all the different mixing techniques you need to get a great drum sound: levels, panning, compression and EQ. Make your tracks sound good with the basics before you add the sugar on top and make them great.

    The Secret Behind Successful Sound Engineering Jobs

    Is a degree in music production from any of the thousands of schools out there necessary to nail those sound engineering jobs or is there something else that is more valuable? Knowledge Like with every field, you need to know what you are doing. Like Steve Albini said in an interview I read long ago,…

    Is a degree in music production from any of the thousands of schools out there necessary to nail those sound engineering jobs or is there something else that is more valuable?

    Knowledge

    Like with every field, you need to know what you are doing. Like Steve Albini said in an interview I read long ago, when talking about those elusive sound engineering jobs:

    “Read as much as you can.”

    In the audio engineering world we can apply most of the knowledge we read in our music production books and trade magazines directly to our craft. Others, more hands-off careers do not have that luxury. So by reading and digesting as much information about the subject as possible you learn more, enabling you to get better at your craft.

    Knowing the basics

    Successful sound engineering or music mixing is not about learning how to use Pro-Tools, Logic or Reason as well as you can. For certain sound engineering jobs you certainly need to know your way around an audio program, but the basics of sound have nothing to do with learning some random audio software. Learning the physics of sound and how audio behaves when you are recording and mixing is the most important part. You can learn Pro-Tools by reading the manual, but the manual does not go into any detail as to how to capture the best sound possible.

    This relates directly back to the prior paragraphs. Learn by reading and then apply the knowledge learned. Of course, there are thousands of books, blogs, videos and tutorials out there that teach you the fundamentals of audio production so it's basically a case of picking and choosing the right ones. I learned an incredible amount from Bobby Owsinski's books, mainly the Mixing Engineer's Handbook, Bill Gibson's music production books and Behind the Glass by Howard Massey. Whatever your knowledge source is, be sure to learn from the ground up since it is much easier to apply certain production techniques when you know how (and why) they work.

    Willingness to experiment

    That said, the willingness to experiment with the various sides of audio production is an important factor is learning as well. Even though you may learn the fundamentals of compression and EQ that does not mean you should not see what happens if you bend or break the rules. You should not be afraid to see what certain processors do maybe a certain no-no might be the exact thing you want in a certain situation. How do you beat the fear of filtering if you never filter past a certain point? How can you be sure if that exact compression ratio or reverb is right for you if you never try anything else out? Be willing to push the envelope, taking what you've learned and seeing if you can not see how it can be better.

    Perseverance

    It's hard to start anything. A new routine, a new exercise program or a new career. It's hard to start a career in any part of the music industry when you have nothing behind you, except maybe a degree or a few pieces of gear. It's even harder to just keep going once you've started, since everyone faces opposition and many cave into it and quit. But those that actually bite the bullet and persevere through sheer tenacity and determination are the ones that make it, and hopefully get those sound engineering jobs that they were expecting for.

    Since audio knowledge is a niche market you might be able to find someone looking for your expertise at some of the job boards online. Look for sound engineering jobs at the FreelanceSwitch job resources for example.

    Finally, even though it might seem daunting to want to start a career as an audio engineer, with perseverance, ambition and an eagerness to succeed I have every faith that you will.

    Knowledge

    The best way to get good at recording, is knowing how to record any instrument and be on top of anything you need to know as a recording engineer. That's how you get jobs. By being good at what you do.

    How to Beat the Fear of Filtering

    You see, filtering too much can severely impair the sound of an instrument. Too much high-pass filtering and you end up with a toppy sounding and thin signal. Too much low-pass filtering and you end up with an instrument that sounds like it's coming through the wall. Try it, cut all the high end down…

    You see, filtering too much can severely impair the sound of an instrument. Too much high-pass filtering and you end up with a toppy sounding and thin signal.

    Too much low-pass filtering and you end up with an instrument that sounds like it's coming through the wall.

    Try it, cut all the high end down to about 500 Hz or so and listen to how you've effectively created a wall between your ears and your sound source.

    But how do you beat the fear of filtering too much?
    When you are using EQ you need to be aware of how everything sounds together. Something may sound really tight and punchy with all those EQ boosts, but when you add it in to everything else it just smothers the mix. You have a limited canvas, and you need to paint a picture where you can see everything. You need to filter out the roots of the trees in order to see the grass that's on top.

    Use an analyzer
    In Logic, you can turn on the frequency analyzer to see the frequency information of a specific sound or instrument. It's a nice crutch when you're not sure where the dominant frequencies of a specific instrument are located. One time I was equalizing a melodica and was getting afraid of filtering too much. I just turned on the analyzer and filtered all the way up to 5 to 700 Hz or so! There was nothing going on below, and even though I heard nothing changing as I filtered more and more I needed a visual to tell me I was all right.

    Use your ears
    Of course, it all starts and ends with your ears. Sweep that filter up until you notice the sound getting weaker, not until you hit a frequency that you read about being needed for a specific purpose. If you can not hear the sound changing, chances are you'll be fine.

    Do not solo
    Do not filter your instruments in solo mode. It's a good idea to start it off in solo, just to hear the instrument better, but in the end everything relates to each other. You might be able to face your fear better by filtering when everything is going on, since it will not be as noticeable that you're filtering past the “standard Hz you should always NEVER filter over”.

    Use a low-pass filter too
    Although high-pass filters are the backbone of EQ'ing out unnecessary low end, low-pass filters should not be overlooked either. They can be handy when there is an overabundance of high frequencies that you need to take care. They can also be used quite effectively to reduce noisy electric guitars. Use the same mentality when using high-cuts (that's another name for low-pass filters). Use your answers and filter until you notice that you're taking something away from the signal.

    Back off a little
    When you've found the area where your filter is finally working and your sound is getting thinner or bassier, back it off a little. Only if it compliments the mix should you filter an instrument severely. I use my filters to take out inaudible low or high energy, not to take the fundamentals out of it. But like I said in step 3, do not filter in solo and filter so that it compliments your mix. Contradicting myself? Maybe, but it's an art.

    Conclusion
    Use your answers, get help from an analyzer and try to filter when the mix is ​​all going on at once and you'll conquer your fears. Use your filters moderately if you have your style, but never be afraid of using them.

    The Only Music Mixing Tips You’ll Ever Need

    You may start out doing levels, then switch to panning and then think about some distortion tips you want to try. Then all of a sudden you do not really know where your mix is ​​going. I like structure when working, so it's good for me to have some sort of work flow when mixing.…

    You may start out doing levels, then switch to panning and then think about some distortion tips you want to try. Then all of a sudden you do not really know where your mix is ​​going.

    I like structure when working, so it's good for me to have some sort of work flow when mixing.

    Instead of bouncing from one music mixing idea to another, follow these tips here below and you'll be well on your way to that mix that's in your head.

    It's a typical 80/20 setting, 80% of the results with 20% of the techniques.

    1. Volume

    You can not have your tracks all over the place. And you can not have all your tracks at the same volume either. Pushing up the faders and getting a balanced mix is ​​the first order of business after you've recorded and edited your tracks.

    2. Panning

    Stereo is important. You do not want all of your tracks fighting for the center.

    If you have different elements and instruments, you need to find a place for them in the stereo spectrum.

    Keep in mind that you do not want to tip the balance of instruments too much to the right or left either.

    Instead, try to find a good equilibrium and balance between the left and right speaker.

    3. EQ

    The first music mixing tool after leveling and panning.

    Equalization is an incredibly useful tool for enhancing the sonic colors of your instruments.

    Repair by cutting, and enhancement by boosting.

    4. Compression

    Compression is what makes your mix breathe. It can also squash your mix and choke out the naturalness of it. Depending on genre, instrument and other considerations, the approach to compression variants.

    Your approach to compression is a big factor in how your mix will end up.

    5. Depth

    Just like we put instruments from left to right with panning, we need to position elements from front to back. By using effects, like reverb, delay and chorus we create depth in a mix. You can not distinguish any space in your mix if all the elements are dry and in your face.

    Plus a little creativity

    Between these five tips and a little extra creativity on your part, I'm positive your next mix will be a solid blend of well balanced and panned tracks, correctly carved EQ and steady compression.

    Sprinkled with a mixture blend of interesting effects, you might just have created your greatest mix yet.

    An Easy Way to Choose the Right Reverb

    What should you think about when choosing the right space for you song? Even though you have a favorite sounding reverb it might not work for that alternative FolkTronica act that you just recorded. Think about the tempo of the song If you are working with a fast tempo song that needs to come across…

    What should you think about when choosing the right space for you song? Even though you have a favorite sounding reverb it might not work for that alternative FolkTronica act that you just recorded.

    Think about the tempo of the song
    If you are working with a fast tempo song that needs to come across clearly and well defined, mucking it up with long reverbs will just make the mix sound cluttered. Think about the tempo of the song and select your reverbs accordingly. A slower song can use longer reverbs, and faster songs might need really short reverbs. Or you could even just use delays instead.

    Think about the wetness of the song
    Do you want your overall mix to be dry, or do you want lush reverbs filling up the space? Are some of the pre-recorded tracks already rich with heavy reverbs and space, or was it all recorded extremely dry? Think about how wet you want your mix to be and choose your reverb according to that.

    Think about the lushness of the arrangement
    Is the arrangement going to be really dry and in-your-face or is everything going to be drowned in space? You may need to keep some elements dry even though you are going for an extremely wet mix, but the more reverb you are putting on your instruments the more you need to anchor it down with at least a few dry instruments. Also, be wary of adding too much reverb since it can be a sign of a very amateurish production.

    Think about the rhythm of the vocal track
    Is the singer singing long sustained notes, scat singing or rapping? These are some of the factors you might want to consider when you are choosing your vocal reverb. The rhythm of the vocal can dictate if the reverb you've chosen actually works. If you're going for “My Heart Will Go On” Celine Dion long sustained singing then a large and long reverb might work exceptionally. But if your singer is Scatman John then a long reverb might just get in the way.

    Think about the room
    Think about the instrumentation and see if you can not place them all together in the same room. Some instruments sound great together when they're “placed” in the same room or reverb device. Say you have a great sounding impulse response from an old recording studio. Use the reverb of that room to glue the instruments together.

    Conclusion
    Take a while to think about the characteristics of the mix at hand and then choose the reverb you think is right.

    Thanks for reading, and please use your social power to tweet or share!

    Why Music Mixing Is Just Like Building a House

    You build from the bottom up. You start with the foundation of a house before you insert the windows or the kitchen sink. Similarly, you start with the foundation of your mix before you start adding automation and effects. Approaching your mix should be approached very much to building a house. Start with the foundation…

    You build from the bottom up. You start with the foundation of a house before you insert the windows or the kitchen sink.

    Similarly, you start with the foundation of your mix before you start adding automation and effects. Approaching your mix should be approached very much to building a house.

    Start with the foundation and build from the bottom up.

    Elements of a foundation

    In your particular mix you have to find the element on which everything else is built. This is usually the drum-beat, since the drum-kit supplies the backbone and rhythm to the song.

    It can also be a sustained pad or a bass line. Whatever the thing is, make sure that it's the most absolutely essential part to making your mix tight and strong. This is the reason why many engineers start by mixing the drum-kit and bass guitar. They want to have their mix built from the bottom up before they start adding in the decor.

    Listen to your song a few times to determine what the fundamental element of your mix is. If it's the drum-beat, start there. If it's not, look for the strongest rhythmic instrument.

    Low end

    Frequency-wise, the low-end is the absolute essential part of making your mix sound right. A thin low-end can compromise an otherwise great sounding track. Excessive low-end can cloud up the mix and too little bass can make the mix sound weak.

    • Filter – Filter out everything that does not need to be in the lower frequencies.
    • Equalization – By notching out competitive frequencies between the low end instruments you can make everything sounds clearer.
    • Side-chaining – You can tighten up the relationship between your drum and bass guitar by side-chaining the bass guitar to the kick drum. Side-chaining can be the most effective way to make room for instruments in a big mix. It lets two instruments essentially play in the same frequency range by ducking out of each other way.

    Start building

    Once you've gotten the building blocks in place you're ready to start building. A common starting point after dealing with the low end and foundation is the vocal, since it's such an integral part of the song.

    You may want to add the rhythm instruments, like guitars and synths to strengthen the foundation as well. However you do it, just make sure that foundation is built and the low end is steady as a house. Everything after that is just decorating!