Sell Your Music Online – A Review of Soundgine and VUE

It has never been easier to share your music with the world. In the year 2016, you do not need to sell CDs, you do not require a label and you do not even need HTML skills. All you need is an internet connection, a small amount of money and the actual music that you…

It has never been easier to share your music with the world. In the year 2016, you do not need to sell CDs, you do not require a label and you do not even need HTML skills. All you need is an internet connection, a small amount of money and the actual music that you want to sell. There are several existing online platforms like myflashstore and soundclick, that give you the chance to sell your music online, but there's one that tops them all, and that is soundgine. Let me tell you why.

1. Several players

With soundgine you get 3 different players which you can implement on your website to sell your music. They all have different features and designs. You can choose which one you want to use and can easily switch between them whenever you want. Furthermore, you'll get a pod player that enables you to post single tracks of your store on social media platforms like Facebook. Whatever player you choose, it will also serve as your music store. People who visit your website can browse through your store, like, and share songs, and finally buy them, through an integrated check-out process.

2. Different payment methods

To maximize your sales, clients should be able to choose between different payment methods. With soundgine, you can give your clients the choice between PayPal and credit card payments. All you have to do is create a PayPal and 2Checkout (allows you to accept credit card payments) account and you're ready to go.

3. Keep all of your profits

No matter how much music you sell through soungine's store, the money will be all yours. Period.

4. Your own website

Soundgine is about selling music online. In order to do so you'll need a music player / shop which you can implement on your website. Yet many musicians out there do not have the time, money or skills to create their own website. Soundgine is aware of that. That's why they offer VUE. VUE is a website builder that comes along with your subscription. It's probably the finest bonus a musician can ever ask for. You do not have to use it, but if you do not have a website or need a secondary website, VUE is the perfect option. They even give you some nicely designed website templates to choose from. Not only that but if you want to make your site more individual, you can customize basically everything through the so called “expert mode” where you can write your own CSS code!

5. Keep your domain name

Many music selling platforms offer a free or paid website, which you can use to sell your music. If you look closely though, these websites will not be yours. The reason why I say this is because of the domain name restrictions. Oftentimes the service's name will be included in the domain that is used for “your” website. So let's say you subscribed to a service called “SellMusic” and your user name would be “ArtistX”. The domain of your site would look something like this: “sellmusic.artistx.com”. In this case you will be connected to the company, whether you like it or not. If you want to support that service as much as you can, you probably will not mind, but if you want to establish your domain name, something like “artistx.com” would look much cleaner and memorable. Also when the service like in our case “SellMusic” is gone for some reason, your domain will be gone too. So you have to create a new domain and promote it all over again. At the very least you have to let your customers know that you have a new domain. Not to speak of the inconvenience that comes with changing your domain in email footers, videos, other online profiles, and getting new business cards etc.
Soundgine lets you use your own domain name. After your subscription, you can easily transfer your domain name, so that it leads to your VUE website. It's actually quite amazing that soundgine allows you to do that. It just shows you that they care about their users and know what's important to them and their businesses.

6. Support

Whenever you use a service, an online service in particular, there are things that you can not control. That's just inevitable. They are the minds behind the product that you use, so you do not have access to every detail of course. That's why it's very important that someone is there for you if something does not work or questions arise. Weather you call them or contact them via email, the support service at soundgine is top-notch. What's really special is the soundgine forum. Not only is it really informative about all music business related topics, but the soundgine team itself actively engages in discussions, and helps you, the end-user out. If you have some trouble with your players or your website, there will be tons of people willing to help. They also really want to hear ideas for new features. So it frequently happens that one soundgine user requests for a certain feature and some months, weeks, even days later, soundgine was able to implement it and comes up with a new update!

Summary:

Soundgine offers everything you'll need to successfully sell your music online. Not only do you get several music players that you can choose from and switch between whenever you like, you also get a free website, if you do not have one already. You can transfer your domain name so that you can establish your website on the market without being dependent on the service itself. Soundgine does not claim any sales percentage, so no matter how much you sell, the money will be yours. The subscription is $ 20 dollars a month, but with all the features that come along with your subscription, the ability to transfer your domain name, which is fair to say the least, and the incredible support service, it's well worth it.

The Main Thing That Determines If Your Music Career Will Be A Success

What is the fundamental factor that determinates whether you will succeed in the music business or fail? The answer is: Your mindset. The level of success you experience in your music career is perfectly analogous to the choices you make and the actions you've picked up to this point. Both of these things are a…

What is the fundamental factor that determinates whether you will succeed in the music business or fail?

The answer is: Your mindset. The level of success you experience in your music career is perfectly analogous to the choices you make and the actions you've picked up to this point. Both of these things are a result of the mindset you have.

Massively successful musicians in the music business are not born with superior musical talent or more potential than other musicians. They just think with an entirely different mindset than everyone else, which causes them to take different actions and get entirely different results.

When you possess a positive and self-stimulating mindset, you will make decisions that lead to actions (for the majority of the time) that produce tons of success for your music career. If you're not sure how to build your music career, having a positive mindset will cause you to ask all the correct questions and seek answers in all the right places.

When you have an average mindset, you may achieve a little bit of success in the music industry, but chances are, you will not see long-term sustainable success.

When you have a negative mindset, you simply will not make it anywhere in the music industry … regardless of what positive things are going on for you currently.

Think about three musicians who are all in equal standing in their music careers, facing three common music industry situations (discussed in a moment). These musicians are exactly the same in every possible way except for one thing: their mindset. The first musician has a negative mindset. The next has an average mindset. Finally, musician three has an empowering mindset.

Read through these examples to understand how big of a difference your mindset can make for the results you get in your music career:

Music Industry Challenge One: Building A Financially Stable Music Career

Musician # 1 thinks : “First I need to have a backup plan in case my music career does not pan out.”

This mindset is fundamentally rooted in a fear of failure, rather than a desire to succeed. In most cases, musicians who think like this choose to get a job that is absolutely unrelated to music. Then, they eventually became trapped in their day job. In the end, the fear they have takes them further away from achieving their musical goals.

Musician # 2 thinks : “I do not want to distract myself from my music career by having a backup plan. way of my musical goals. ”

This approach drastically increases your chances of making it in music. When all that is left is either success or failure, choosing success is the best choice for achieving what you want.

However, this approach is also very black and white … which leads to unnecessary risk. Although it increases your chances of achieving your goals, it does almost nothing to eliminate your chances of failure. If you ignore any short-term financial liabilities or deadlines, you will struggle to build a successful career in music. Tons of musicians have this mindset and give up … never realizing their musical dreams.

Musician # 3 thinks : “I need to build my music career without struggling financially. I must earn money using an approach that: 1. Allows a lot of freedom to work on my music, 2. Works hand-in-hand with my long -term musical goals, 3. Does not force me to work 40+ hours every week. By doing this I can pursue my musical goals without any financial struggle or hardship. ”

Understanding how to grow your music career in this manner is simple (you can find out how by getting music career mentoring). The difficult part is staying away from the two previously mentioned mindsets.

Before you continue reading, test yourself to find out how close you are to having a financially secure and stable music career.

Music Industry Challenge Two: Getting More Paying Gigs:

Musician # 1 thinks : “I'm not making enough money from my gigs because booking venue owners do not pay well and are ripping me off.”

Musicians who think like this will never be able to find the best gigs that pay tons of money. If you want to earn more money from a gig, you have to help that income earn more money. By just showing up and playing, you will not achieve this goal (unless you are already a huge band with tons of fans).

Musician # 2 thinks : “I need to get more people to come to my shows. This will help any venue see the value I have to earn them more money, so they'll pay me more.”

This kind of thinking helps you make more money from your gigs. When you build value in the eyes of the people you want to work with, it raises the amount of money that they are willing to invest into working with you (ie paying you for a gig).

However, this mindset is still limited in the amount of success it can bring you.

Musician # 3 thinks : “I need to get more people to come see me play and get them to purchase my music / merchandise + actively support my band.”

Using this mindset causes you to take drastically different actions when it comes to self-promotion (when contrasted to the other approaches I mentioned). This will lead to very different and larger results.

This mindset will help you:

1. Get more people to come out and see you, helping the income earn more money in the process.

2. Make way more income overall (from the money you make from the gig + music and merchandise sales).

3. Not worry too much about how much money you make from the show itself.

4. Make it easier for you to get the gig, since you can do it for much less money than anyone else.

5. Build solid relationships with the people who book your shows, venue owners and your fans. This increases your chances of getting better gigs in the future.

Music Industry Challenge Three: Getting Valuable Opportunities In The Music Business:

Musician # 1 thinks : “If you want a shot at valuable music industry opportunities, you just have to get lucky, be in the right place / right time or know someone in the business.”

These kinds of musicians take control out of their own hands, and put it into the hands of people they never knew and will probably never meet. They are full of excuses, and avoid taking responsibility for making their musical lives better.

Musician # 2 thinks : “If I just put in a lot of hard work, I'll always reach the goals I want.”

This mindset supports self-motivation, taking responsibly and having a great work ethic all important hits to have in the music industry). This is light years ahead of the negative mindset I just described, and will help you go far in the music business.

However, hard work alone will not bring you long-lasting success. A lot of musicians fail to achieve success in the music business, because they are not sure exactly what to do or how to do it.

Musician # 3 thinks : “I'm not sure how to get really big music business opportunities … but I'll do whatever I have to in order to find out. I have to get training from someone who has already done it before . I can not make assumptions about how the music industry works based on advice from people who have never succeeded in it at a high level. ”

No matter how much you know about the music industry in this moment, having an empowering mindset will help you discover the things you do not know, and put you on the best track for success.

Bottle Service or Dance Floor?

After studying in Los Angeles for six months I got to see how the nightlife works over there. Many nightclubs focus on bottle service by having cubicles of couches and tables where you'll have to book a table with bottles accommodated to enter the club. Then there are few nightclubs that focus more on the…

After studying in Los Angeles for six months I got to see how the nightlife works over there. Many nightclubs focus on bottle service by having cubicles of couches and tables where you'll have to book a table with bottles accommodated to enter the club.

Then there are few nightclubs that focus more on the dance floor. These are the clubs where you mainly come to dance and enjoy the music.

Maybe you've seen videos where bottle girls carry bottles up in the air with sparkling things on? This is bottle service in its essence. Making sure everyone in the club knows you paid for a table and getting everyone's attention that you are popping bottles! Now this can be fun it's like when being a kid and getting your birthday cake with candles on. Nightclubs found a way for you to be able to get the same feeling when you're an adult, very smart!

I also went to one of the larger nightclubs on my last weekend in LA where they focus on the music meaning they had a big dance floor, an over the top sound system, a cooling system blasting CO2 and even a doorman you can pay a little bit extra to skip the line (unfortunately we realized this after 1.5 hours standing in line). That night they had booked one of the top international DJ's that year, a DJ I had wanted to look out for years meaning I had a really good time.

Being a foreign student I really could not afford any table however I did know hot chicks to bring with me. So this was very limiting for me, but one night I got the chance to go to one of the exclusive clubs at the top of a hotel where the people I was with had a table and bottles. I had really fun but to think of it, it was kind of stiff as everyone trying to look hot and rich. The DJ was playing the top 40 tracks of the most popular genres, trying to please everyone. I was told he was not allowed to play to unknown or underground music. Which is something DJ's often hear from club owners.

Where does this phenomenon come from that the visitors have to recognize the songs being played? Can we only dance to songs we already know? If it was a sing-a-long or karaoke night I would get it but the DJ's job is also to introduce the people to new sounds and be able to mix well to keep the people dancing. As far as I know we can dance to music if it sounds good to us whenever we recognize the track or not.

But maybe it makes sense that bottle service nightclubs only play top 40 tracks because I guess that their main customers are not into any certain music scene and want to sing-a-long to the songs they know?

I've seen a trend where many nightclubs go after the exclusive High-end feeling, not only in US but also in other countries. What I wonder is for how long do we want to chase luxury? Why not experiences? Just having a luxurious venue and high prices is not enough anymore, I've become more demanding in what I want from my nightlife and I believe I'm not the only one. Since the EDM hype started many people got an insight of what clubbing is all about and it has nothing to do with high prices and a luxurious venue. It's about the music and going back home with a smile of new memories.

I'm not going to lie when I was youngger I wanted to live the Rap Star life (some days I still do) but as I grew older and traveled I wanted to feed my life with new experiences because living on a tight budget your life is all you got and experiences the only thing that last. I therefore really appreciate nightclubs that dare to be different and think of the full experience they deliver. Because exclusive high-end can never be cool, it's just expensive.

So what do I prefer bottle service or dance floor? I'm still exploring the world of nightlife by going to events of other music scenes then I used to. From underground Techno parties to Rock clubs, it has become a journey in itself and I really do not listen to rock music at all but to hear it in its context you get carried away with it and can start to appreciate the culture it has. Even tough I sometimes might stand out from the usual crowd we got something in common and its that we like to party!

What kind of nightclubs do you like?

Radio Music of the 70s

When I remember songs from the radio stations of the 70's I remember feeling a sense of positivity, joy and inspiration. A sense of expansion, of spiritual awareness, infinity and the power of universal spirit charges my body like an electrical current. When hear the lyrics I am constantly remindeded keep our head up! That…

When I remember songs from the radio stations of the 70's I remember feeling a sense of positivity, joy and inspiration. A sense of expansion, of spiritual awareness, infinity and the power of universal spirit charges my body like an electrical current. When hear the lyrics I am constantly remindeded keep our head up! That things are going to get better! That even though we walk in the material dimension we are still spiritual beings. And we must never forget this important truth.

Radio music of the 70's was probably the greatest production of music in any era. And this is across the board … all genre, from County, Folk, Funk Rock and Jazz. It was superior in many ways due to the fact the artists were allowed to create freely. Using rich poetic lyrics that combine imagery and complex storylines. Like Gordon Lightfoot's haunting, “If You Could Read My Mind”, Jim Croce's, “Time in a Bottle”, and Breads “Diary.” Of course the classic “Hotel California” is a cross national hit that is played at campfires by young musicians. Dolly Parton, Charlie Rich and Glen Campbell county songs were all hits. And we all sang them. John Denver's Rocky Mountain High “and Thank God I ma Country Boy” all songs their songs went number one on the top 40 charts.

The stories in the songs were often told / song in the 3rd person. Consider Lightfoot's “Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald” s Led Zeppelin's “Stairway to Heaven”, Elton John's “Daniel”. Earth Wind and Fire would sing directly at the listener with “Keep You Head to the Sky” and “Shining Star”. It was an art form that is rarely used today.

That creativity did not stop there! There was an explosion of songs that mixed styles. From Steele Dan's Jazz infused pop, to the band Yes which combined classical music with rock and jazz creating musical compositions that Mozart would have been impressed with. Jethro Tull blazing execution on the flute and of course Pink Floyd! The Philly Sound with Hall and Oates exploded on the scene with the R and B. Earth Wind and Fire with their blend of genre bending music creating a sophisticated blend of gospel, soul, rock and Brazilian rhythms. Reggae became increasingly popular. Black music reflected a message of spirituality and positive message, and political unrest being as sung by legends as Marvin Gaye, Curtis Mayfield, Bob Marley and Stevie Wonder.

Radio stations back in the early part of the 70's played all songs at that time. There was not segregated radio stations. One particular radio station, KFRC in San Francisco would play Elton John, then Tower of Power and Dolly Parton in the same hour. Songs could be played longer than 3; 40 seconds. As far as I know, no one complained. As a kids I sit and sing to every one of those songs.

But it was the live concerts and performances that these trailblazers would shine. Their musicianship and performances were of such high execution it would rival much of today's music. Music, in those days, were a well thought out live arrangements, with sophisticated musicianship, and solid performances. From The Doobie Brothers, to America, to Parliament and Al Greene, the live sound and musicianship was at a high level! Often I come across a young boy or girl playing Stairway to Heaven. It makes me smile! Because it offers proof that the music of the 70's will endure!

How To Make Money With Music

Generating income or monetizing work poses a big challenge for musicians anywhere. In this technology driven world, selling music becomes harder and harder each year. The competition is not the only thing that’s stiff, but the music evolution and audience are much harder to please.

Generating income or monetizing work poses a big challenge for musicians anywhere. In this technology driven world, selling music becomes harder and harder each year. The competition is not the only thing that’s stiff, but the music evolution and audience are much harder to please.

Music Licensing Companies

The music industry revenue has encountered steadier growth for the past decade and the experts projected it will stay in that course for the foreseeable future. The numbers may spike up with the growing popularity of streaming among the younger generation. As the physical sales wane in the turn of 2010, other means of sales…

The music industry revenue has encountered steadier growth for the past decade and the experts projected it will stay in that course for the foreseeable future. The numbers may spike up with the growing popularity of streaming among the younger generation. As the physical sales wane in the turn of 2010, other means of sales had emerged and millions of independent musicians turned to licensing their music in hopes to monetize their work. The internet paved the way for more business opportunities and almost all of them require music content. There are more music revenues to be collected compared a decade ago as we have more TV show, ads, commercials, campaigns, video games, movies, films, establishments and companies today. Every single industry needs music content to operate in order to appeal to the public. It is part of their marketing plan and these industries require the services of music licensing companies to facilitate such needs.

As a matter of fact, the US music industry revenue for 2015 rose 0.9% to haul in $ 7 billion dollars. The RIAA also announced that streaming has overtaken the digital and physical sales of music for the first time, rising from 27% in 2014 to 34% in 2015. The streaming sales went up by a mere 29% in 2015. Digital sales fell from $ 2.58 billion in 2014 to $ 2.33 billion in 2015, a 9.6% decline. With the rise of streaming, the physical sales suffered the most downward spiral as it only accrued $ 1.9 billion sales, 10% of sales in the US. This was not the case 10 years ago as physical sales dominated the music industry.

The big chunk of those coming from performing rights organizations and music licensing companies. These companies license the music of their members and distribute it to different industries across the country. There are three performing rights organizations for musicians across the US and they are ASCAP, SESAC and BMI.

The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) is a not-for-profit performance rights organization which protects its members' musical copyright by monitoring the public performances of their music. This organization was launched in 1914, making it the oldest among the three. They compensate their members basing on the live and public performances of their music of other sectors.

As of 2015, ASCAP has licensed over 500,000 songwriters, composers and music publishers. In the year 2014, it has collected over $ 941 million dollars in licensing fees and distributed $ 828.7 million in royalties to its members. ASCAP is charging $ 50 fee as a writer and $ 50 fee as a publisher to become a member. In order to collect your publisher's share of royalties as an ASCAP member, you need to have an ASCAP publishing company.

Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI) is a performing rights organization in the US. This organization was established in 1939. It collects licenses fees on behalf of its members and distributes them as royalties to songwriters, composers and music publishers whenever their work is used in live or public performances. In 2015, BMI has collected more than $ 1.013 billion dollars in licensing fees and distributed over $ 877 million dollars in royalties to its members. BMI is representing 8.5 million musical works created and owned by more than 650,000 members. In order to be a member, BMI has a $ 150 fee for publishers. However, they will not collect any fee for songwriters. You do not need a publishing company to collect your publisher's share of royalties at BMI.

Society of European Stage Authors and Composers, commonly known today as SESAC, is also a performing rights organization in the US. SESAC was first operated in 1930, the second oldest among the three. Unlike ASCAP and BMI, SESAC members must be approved or recruited to join their organization. It does not have an open membership. They represent over 400,000 songs on behalf of its 30,000 affiliated writers. SESAC also retains an undisclosed amount of performance royalty income from its members.

These organizations collect royalty fees to industries that are using the work of their members. They distribute the royalties collected back to their members. A royalty fee is the payment collected by one party from another for the ongoing use of a copyrighted asset. For example, if a song of their member is played in TV shows, movies or ads, they will collect the royalty and distribute it back to their member who is the copyright owners of music used. There are also different kinds of music royalties which you need to remember.

Mechanical Royalty – Mechanical royalty are royalties paid to a songwriter whenever a copy of one of their songs is made. This royalty is paid by record labels or to those who are in charge of releasing the albums of the songwriters.

Performance Rights Royalty – Performance rights royalty is a royalty paid to a songwriter on a live performance of a song. Aside from a song used in live performances such as city events, parades, etc., a live performance can also be a public playing of a recorded song such as radio play, TV commercials, advertisements and more. Blanket license is also used to hand out a large amount of music for an agreed period of time. This usually occurs in cases where individual song licenses would be difficult to manage. Blanket licenses are used by performance rights societies to give license applicants access to the entire album or songs of their members.

The usual split between musicians and these companies are 50/50 while others are 60/40. The percentage of the split is normally negotiable to benefit both parties involved.

There are also other means of compensation from the usage of music content. These are called sync fees. A Sync fee is a license granted by a holder of a copyrighted music to allow a licensee to synchronize music with visual media. Visual media are composed of TV shows, films, movies, ads, commercials, websites, video games, etc.

Sync fees are usually paid upfront and negotiated thouroughly based on the usage of asset. For example, if a car company need music content for an upcoming commercial, they will actively look out for songs that could possibly fit with what they are trying to accomplish. The need is immediate and the compensation is also upfront. Sync fees can range from a few dollars up to thousands, depending on the content. Some packages are one time fees and others are base on airimes or usage.

There are other parties involve in collecting royalties such as music publishing companies. Music publishing companies are in charge of making deals with songwriters and composers. They promote the songs of their songwriters and composers to musicians and to anyone else who may need music content such as films, TV commercials, etc. They also issue licenses for the use of the songs they represent and collect licensing fees.

A lot of music publishers are hands on regarding the distribution of work which are made by songwriters and musicians. Music publishers possess a wide experience about what to do and they will have a great list of contacts in order to promote songs to the maximum number of potential licensees and negotiate the payment and usage of each asset.

Most have internal connections or are subscribed to specific industries and other services that give them early tips or indications if someone is looking for music content for any particular project. They are also aware of industry resurgence and influx of new or old industries that needs music content. Music publishers are always on the lookout for new sources of income in this technology driven world.

If you are a songwriter or an independent musician, you should get your music licensed. Not only it is important, it also saves you time to solely focus on your passion and let the others handle all the complex stuff in music licensing. Some of the music licensing companies also act as an advisor and critic, so learning more stuff could actually enhance your chances of hitting it big locally or nationally.

Now is a great time monetize and share your work to others so you can not let this opportunity pass. The music industry is constantly evolving and reaching new heights of in terms of revenue. You should evolve with them by making quality music and widening your craft at the same time.

You can have more information about music licensing companies together with my personal top 50 music licensing companies across the US by watching my free video training course at http://silverscreenmusician.com . See you there!

Music Career

There's no denying that everyone enjoys music. Whatever country you're from and wherever you are at the moment, you simply appreciate what music has brought to this world. Some are talented enough to land music careers nationally or internationally and some are lucky enough to enjoy a fruitful music career after being discovered by agents…

There's no denying that everyone enjoys music. Whatever country you're from and wherever you are at the moment, you simply appreciate what music has brought to this world. Some are talented enough to land music careers nationally or internationally and some are lucky enough to enjoy a fruitful music career after being discovered by agents from music industries. While carving out a music career can take up time and a whole new dimension of dedication to your craft, many musicians enjoyed the process and achieved significant results from it.

There are a few ways to go when you decide to take up a career in music. Independent musicians are currently exploiting all the possibilities that they could find in order to get a shot of being signed by music companies. If you're a music artist, you should also explore all the angles so you can start carving out your own music career.

Quality work of music – You need to record your own craft with quality audio, instruments, background music, etc. Music companies are always on the lookout for the next great artist. They always look for professionals as striking a deal with them can be much easier than wannabe amateurs. You can start by investing your money, time and effort by creating quality music. Have someone who's also musically inclined to listen to your records to gain an outsider's perspective.

Work ethic drive – Focusing solely on your craft can unveil a new dimension for your passion and creativity. Becoming a good musician does not happen overnight. It takes years of practice and it also takes a whole lot of time of dedication to your passion. A very good work ethic can typically boost and solidify the quality of music you create.

Be creative – Do not be afraid to experiment on different music styles. The music industry is very complex nowdays. New genres are on the rise and most of them have taken the mainstream music by storm. Do not put a limit on creativity and imagination. Also be flexible on covering multiple genres. Music licensing companies usually see that quality as a big plus before signing individual musicians.

Good studio recording skills – This skill could have been learned by trial and error. It also takes years of practice to hone your studio recording skills. A good ear and a keen attention to detail will always guide you on how to produce great results. Have your track or playlist professionally recorded to attract music licensing companies.

Branding and website – Always sound professional and stay away from old bad habits you used to have. The music industry is full of professionals. If you want to impress and get signed by them, be as professional as you can be. Also, you must invest in making your own website. In the technology driven world today, music agents will take a quick look at your website and decide if you have what it takes to get signed.

Get your music licensed – After following all the things above, it's about time to reach out to music licensing companies to get your music licensed. You can never start your music career if your music had not been licensed by music licensing companies. Monetize your work through music licensing and be discovered by influential people along the way.

Those are only a few examples on how to carve out a music career for yourself. Creating a skilled out of music can be lucrative and rewarding if you just dedicate your time and effort into it. It's not hard by any means because if you do something you love, it's not considered work at all. Let your passion grow and continue to discover newer stuff every day. You can learn more on how to improve your music and how you can jumpstart your music career by paying a visit at my website, http://silverscreenmusician.com . Have an awesome day!

How To License Your Music

Music is a big part of civilization. Centuries had passed but music survived and even grew to greater heights every single decade. As a matter of fact, the demand of music has been rising very steadily in the past 10 years and it will continue that way in the foreseeable future. It comes along with…

Music is a big part of civilization. Centuries had passed but music survived and even grew to greater heights every single decade. As a matter of fact, the demand of music has been rising very steadily in the past 10 years and it will continue that way in the foreseeable future. It comes along with the big amount of revenue the music industry is currently getting year after year. It is an unstoppable force as people always look up for the next great artist around the corner, thus continuing the cycle and the relevance of music. The demand of music content is at an all time high. The global music revenue since the turn of the century has been steady. The currency is measured in billions.

As the technology grew, music got more technical, complex and in demand. Others take credit for using music they do not own. Nowadays, independent musicians are well aware of protecting their work for legal purposes. Through music licensing, you can be ensured of your asset / work being protected legally.

What is music licensing? Music licensing is the licensed used for copyrighted music. This allows the owner of the music to maintain the copyright of their original work. It also ensures the owner of the musical work to be compensated if their music is being used by others. The music licensing companies has limited rights to use the work without separate agreements. In music licensing, you could get your work licensed in the form of music, composition and songwriting.

During the music licensing process, there are terms that would have been discussed by the groups involved. If you are an independent musician, you would be the licensor. You are the one responsible of the music created, so you are the copyright owner of the licensed work. A licensee would be the music licensing company as they would be the one who will distribute your work to other industries. They will also collect the royalty fees as distribute them back to you if your music is included in live performances, TV shows, ads, campaigns, video games, etc.

There are also two kinds of contracts in music licensing, namely exclusive contract and non-exclusive contract. Exclusive contract means having your work licensed exclusively to a single music licensing company. Only a single company has the authority to distribute and market your work. If you signed an exclusive contract to your song or album, you can not use the same music contents and get it signed by other music licensing companies. The agreement is exclusive and confidential to the licensor and the licensee.

Non-exclusive contract allows a second party to distribute your work and it does not prohibit the licensor to sell their music to other music licensing companies or licensees. An independent musician can sign a non-exclusive contract to multiple companies using the same music content. Non-exclusive contracts are generally used to prevent an individual from being locked into a restrictive contract before their work gains popularity. This type of contract is designed to protect music artists from being taken advantage of in the early stages of their relevant careers while on the process of getting their music out to larger audiences.

There are also cases which involves direct payment for used music content. This is called Sync Fees. Sync fee is a license granted by a holder of a copyrighted music to allow a licensee to synchronize music with visual media such as ads, movies, TV shows, movie trailers, video games, etc. For example, a video producer is in dire need of music content for a certain project and is in a limited time of finding one.

In these cases, the artist and the music licensing company will be contacted directly for the possible use of the original work and negotiate the upfront payment involved. Sync fees can range from a few dollars to a couple of hundred dollars or up to thousands. The payment usually depends on how big and established a company is. If it is a well known company, there is a probability that the sync fee will spike up in value.

We need to understand that businesses nowdays are paying premium for music at an all time high. The influx and revenue generated on different industries are worth billions of dollars and the music artists who got their music licensed will get a big share of that money. The content of music is very important. Every single company need visual and audio content. You can not do ads, shows and movies without having any music content.

Music licensing brings compensation for assets used. This is called royalty fees. A royalty fee is the payment collected by one party from another for the ongoing use of a copyrighted asset. You can get compensated if your work is featured on live public performances. For every live use of your music, you get compensated as you own the copyright of your work.

The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) has collected over $ 941 million dollars in licensing fees and distributed $ 827.7 million dollars in royalties to its members back in 2014. BMI on the other hand, collected more than $ 1.013 billion dollars in license fees and distributed over $ 877 million dollars in royalties to its members during the year 2015.

Music licensing is the modern way of listening through music. In the past few years, the physical sales had gone down. Streaming music has taken over because it's more convenient and practical with the help of the World Wide Web. With the rise of streaming sales, the figures that could have been collected as royalty fees could have spike up in the years coming. In fact, as stated in an Australian financial review website, streaming generated $ 2.5 billion dollars in US music sales last year, overtaking digital downloads as the industry's largest source of music revenue. As stated in the picture below, the global streaming of music is planned to reach greater heights in terms of revenue in the coming years.

The internet contributed greatly for the rise of music licensing and streaming. 20 years ago, the distribution of music has not been exactly this big. Television shows and filmmakers are the top two industries that need music content. Today, there are more and more TV shows, films, commercials, movies, ads and tons of video games that need music content. It is safe to say that the Internet opened the public eye about the opportunities involved behind it.

One of the most visited sites on earth is YouTube. People use, duplicate, rework, copy, revise and perform music from different artists around the world. It also has an influx of ads which contains music content. To track all these data, YouTube has a Content ID System. If your music is licensed, you can contact this site and they will take a look at their data and see if your work is being used by other parties. As the licensor, you have the authority to take actions such as mute the audio which matches your music, block a whole video from being viewed, track the video's viewership statistics or monetize the video by running ads against it. Every country has different rules about it. But YouTube runs a lot of ads and monetizing work from this site is very probable.

If you are an independent musician, you must improve and instill professionalism in your craft to get your chances up of being signed by a music licensing company. With billions of dollars of revenue involved today, you want at least a slice of the pie. Monetizing your passion is never easy but taking the necessary steps to make it work is a must to reach success.

I can teach you more information about music licensing and the secrets behind it. Visit my site, http://silverscreenmusician.com and I guarantee that you will be a step ahead from others with all the information I will share to you. See you there!

Diary of a Touring Musician: Wedding Bell Blues

Life as a traveling musician can be very hard on any kind of romantic relationship. Fortunately for me, my husband John and I work together. This does not mean that we are free from strife and annoyances, but we do manage to sidestep a lot of the issues associated with a significant other being left…

Life as a traveling musician can be very hard on any kind of romantic relationship. Fortunately for me, my husband John and I work together. This does not mean that we are free from strife and annoyances, but we do manage to sidestep a lot of the issues associated with a significant other being left at home.

Sometimes, however, the significant other just can not be sounded. One of our former drummers, Ken, had a girlfriend who was constantly miserable; she was angry when he went on the road without her, and consistently complained about everything when she came along. Ken finally had enough and broke up with her.

About this same time, he started talking to Sylvia, which he knew from his “real” job. They hit it off right away, and while we were out on tour, he texted and talked to her constantly. He said he had finally found someone who would support his dream of being a working musician, and was the happiest that we had ever seen him.

I had known Ken for many years, and had worked with him on some previous projects. He had been with my current band for over three years, and I felt we all had a strong “family” bond. After he and his new girl had been dating for a few weeks, he invited her to go out on the road with us. She appeared happy to go on our little adventure, and things went well. Two weeks later we went out on an extended run, starting with a week in Cheyenne, Wyoming, several days in Mescalero , New Mexico, then a deadhead run straight up to Bismark, North Dakota for a week. Sylvia seemed like she was having a good time, and she even got up onstage with the band to dance and sing some backup vocals.

Just before we left Wyoming, Ken announced that they were going to get married in New Mexico. The gig in New Mexico is one of the few gigs that does not include lodging, so in order to save money, we all agreed to share one room. This was a slight inconvenience, especially for newlyweds, but we made the best of it. They decided to get married on Sunday morning before we left for North Dakota. With the help of some local relatives, the happy couple located a pastor, and the wedding ceremony was a nice, simple success. Although we had a very long drive ahead of us, and had to be in Bismark by Tuesday evening, we decided to stay in New Mexico for one more night in separate rooms so they could have a proper wedding night.

The following morning, we loaded up and hit the road. The newlyweds were traveling in their own vehicle, so we said “see you in Bismark” and parted company. Everyone survived the grueling drive, and we settled into the band room. The band room was basically a motel room with a large extra bedroom attached. To get in and out of the room, my family had to pass through the newlyweds area constantly, and there seemed to be some growing tension in the air that worsened every day.

The day after our arrival in Bismark, our booking agent called to see if we could head up to Minot, North Dakota for the following week, and then on to Montana for a week. This is often how we work. Everyone connected to the band agreed on doing the shows, so we “signed” the contract (electronically). We were now legally committed to the appearance. Minot is only a two hour drive from Bismark, but we were having some tire issues with our van. We told Ken that we were going to stop and buy some tires before heading up. Since we had another two weeks of work lined up, we spent most of our cash on tires, oil, and other vehicular needs.

After a couple of hours, we were on our way. About halfway to our destination, I received a text from Sylvia saying that the newlyweds were not going to Minot, but have headed home instead. My family and I were put into a very difficult situation; we spent our cash on our van, and had no gas money to get home to Utah (800 miles away). We were also under contract, so not showing up for the gigs would have meant a lawsuit and loss of work. I immediately called some good friends in Minot, who were musicians. Gary had played steel guitar onstage with us in Minot before, and his wife Julie just happened to be a drummer!

They saved us from a horrible fate, and the weeklong gig was great. They were unable to continue the tour, so I called another drummer out of Salt Lake City, Utah to meet us in Montana for our next show, and he turned out to be a great asset and decided to stay on as a permanent band member. Although I am glad we got through the tour okay, I'm still very sad about losing our friendship with Ken, and we have not heard from him or Sylvia since.

Here Is What You Should Be Asking If You Are Serious About Growing A Successful Music Career

A lot of musicians are asking the wrong things when trying to figure out how to move forward in their music careers. These things include questions that come from a place of fear, negativity, false assumptions and misunderstandings about how the music industry truly works. By looking for answers to the wrong questions, you all…

A lot of musicians are asking the wrong things when trying to figure out how to move forward in their music careers. These things include questions that come from a place of fear, negativity, false assumptions and misunderstandings about how the music industry truly works. By looking for answers to the wrong questions, you all but guarantee failure for your music career.

Music Marketing Tips To Help Create Super Fans

We, as musicians, have literally made bounding leaps of progress in technology, and many leaps in the concept of reaching out to people. It used to be that only the major record labels had access to the “right” connections. Or access to the people who know more people, people who have influence. Some of those…

We, as musicians, have literally made bounding leaps of progress in technology, and many leaps in the concept of reaching out to people. It used to be that only the major record labels had access to the “right” connections. Or access to the people who know more people, people who have influence. Some of those people were like a man dangling a spider over a fire, and it was up to them if you should be dropped or continued.

The good thing is now you do not have to become famous to become wealthy with your music. Another good thing is we have access to all the tools we need, very similar to the tools that the major labels have used to help create countless success stories of major artists who have made it to the top. As man has evolved these tools have become faster, more reliable, more efficient, and easily accessible to anyone with a computer and internet.

Do you want to make money doing what you love to do? Of course you do. I think it is important to begin by creating both long-term and short-term goals. Goals will show us the direction in which to face. Next, ask yourself “why? Why do I want to be successful in the music industry?” When I asked myself this question, these were the answers I got:

Popularity – It's a comforting thought; it feels good to feel validated, but I can dig deeper. We are deeper creatures than that.

Wealth – Money is not the only motive, if you work hard enough, money will come to you regardless of what you do.

Self Expression – An artist often has a fire burning inside to create, and music is an excellent outlet.

“Well, Amber”, I asked myself, “what else is there?” We, as human beings, have a desire, a true innate desire to make the world better place to live. A lot of musicians write music in order to connect with humanity, to share experiences in love, joy, hate, sorrow, invalidity. Maybe the sounds that your heart and soul create are mean for others who have had similar life experiences. If you can reach out to these people, maybe they will not feel alone in regard to these circumstances. You want to connect with them, and you want them to connect with you on a level far deeper than a normal conversation. If more people communicated in this manner, this world might be a better place.

So now what? When you resonate with the feelings that are inside you, when you find your truth and motive, you can begin your steps. You begin to know which direction to take. The next step is: which genre of music do you want to communicate in? It does not really matter which style of music you choose. There are multiple types of human beings out there who are looking for your particular music, your particular experiences. And if you reach them, there will be a solid connection.

Once you decide on your genre, let your creative juices flow. WRITE, WRITE, WRITE! Keep a notebook handy for lyric ideas. Invest in a small hand-held recorder for music ideas. Most cel phones have some type of voice recorder app built-in; These are great for recording musical bits and pieces. There are very affordable home recording programs available, and these can be an invaluable tool for song creation. If you need inspiration, choose an artist who has a similar style, and study his or her technique. Listen to their first release, and then their most recent, paying close attention to the evolution of their writing.

Record all of your ideas and get feedback from anyone and everyone. Do not just seek validation from your friends; they are not going to be objective. If you can, get advice from people in the music business, and be prepared for honest responses; do not let your feelings get hurt.

Once you have a tangible product (be it a complete CD, or only one song), put it on your Facebook page (if you do not have a Facebook page, where the heck have you been for the last ten years?). Post it and re-post it once a week. Look into other music sites like Reverbnation or CD Baby. The more exposure your music has, the closer you get to acquiring “Superfans”.

What's a Superfan? A Superfan is someone who really likes what you have to offer, and often times will feel a kindred connection to your music. A Superfan will support your career regardless of what critics may say. If you decide to pursue a major label contract, a showcase in a room full of your Superfans will really tip the scales in your favor. Keep in mind that once you sign a contract with a major, they basically own you.

If you should launch a funding campaign, for example on gofundme.com or kickstarter.com, a Superfan may contribute way more than the minimum requirement, which is definitely going to help you achieve your goal. Let's do some math: if one Superfan contributions $ 100 a year, and you have 1000 Superfans, that's $ 100,000 a year! Does that sound like a plan for comfortable living? You tell me.

The most important step is to have a solid strategy, and stick to it. Do not listen to the “nay-sayers”. If you are part of a band, make sure all members share the same vision. A band dragging the “dead weight” of a recipient partner will go now. The best advice I can give you is never stop chasing YOUR dream. In the immortal words of The Doors: “Keep your eyes on the road and your hands up the wheel”.

Dan Bettridge at Hay

'Stick with me baby, I'm the guy that you came in with' is the famous payoff line from one of Frank Sinatra's best known songs “Luck be a Lady” and nobody, but nobody, could have been more in need of five minutes in the precious company of Dame Fortune than singer-songwriter Dan Bettridge at Hayker…

'Stick with me baby, I'm the guy that you came in with' is the famous payoff line from one of Frank Sinatra's best known songs “Luck be a Lady” and nobody, but nobody, could have been more in need of five minutes in the precious company of Dame Fortune than singer-songwriter Dan Bettridge at Hayker week.

Things went wrong almost from the moment Bettridge, plagued by the back pain that has troubled him following a recent mountain bike accident in Canada, stepped gingerly onto the BBC Horizons stage and, in the act of lowering him himself on to a distinctly uncomfortable looking chair, knocked over his mug of tea. After a quick bit of mopping up and a nervous apology he attempted to strike up his one-man band only to find that his acoustic guitar had taken an unexpected vow of silence. As a worried pair of BBC sound technicians scrabbled between the snaking cables, Bettridge worked through an impromptu Q & A during which we discovered that his favorite book (well, this was a literature festival after all!) Is Neil Young's Waging Heavy Peace, that he chews liquorice to heal his sore throat and that he hails from the small coastal village of Ogmore-by-Sea.

Just as the audience began to contemplate the idea that a troop of black cats must have crisscrossed his path in the festival car park, sound was miraculously restored (thanks to a borrowed guitar) and Dan Bettridge started to sing “Memphis”. As soon as the whiskey-soured lonesomeness of his vocal drifted across the chill night air, you realized that luck has a habit of averaging itself out. The gangly 21 yr old has been blessed with a vintage voice redolent of a weather-beaten Texan troubadour (Townes Van Zandt circa “Snowin 'on Raton” would not be too wide of the mark!), Which makes heartfelt use of on songs like “Rosie Darling” and the superior narrative ballad “Letters Home”, an excellent addition to his already impressive repertoire of lachrymose vignettes, any of which, could bust the steepest of hearts wide open in the time it takes to down a jug of “white lightening”.

Bettridge closed his short set (“Drive” had to be ditched because of the singer's earlier guitar gremlins) with two songs of exceptional quality. “Wolves and Ghosts” showcased his strength as a lyricist – 'I've fallen in holes darker than those hearts of ex-lovers', whilst his new single “Third Eye Blind” is an outright soul classic in the making. Its killer refrain and scorching vocal make it just about the best thing Dan Bettridge has ever written (better, perhaps, than last year's magnificently dystopian ballad “Darker Days”). It's the song of the year, and I do not care if we're only halfway through 2015!

Basic Tips On How To Market Your Music Online

— Tip # 1: Quality — First and for most, you must have quality music. Without you want to be the next Slim Jesus or Rebecca Black, you should have quality music that is worth listening to. Not only should your music have good content, but it also needs to sound professional and catchy. If…

— Tip # 1: Quality —

First and for most, you must have quality music. Without you want to be the next Slim Jesus or Rebecca Black, you should have quality music that is worth listening to. Not only should your music have good content, but it also needs to sound professional and catchy. If you already have good quality music, then let's move on to the next tips!

— Tip # 2: Social Media —

Social Media is a great way to market and share your music! You can literally connect with thousands of people in seconds! You should at least sign up to three different social media sites. It might be hard to keep up with more than three, so I advise you to stick with three. If you think you can handle more, then please sign up to as many as you'd like! The more the better. Stay active, but do not to spam! That just annoys people and can seem like you're desperate for attention. Instead of spamming, give value to your followers and friends. Post quotes, pictures, and tips! Post pictures of your equipment, everyday activities, or quotes from your song! You can post links to your site as well, but do not spam!

YouTube is the second largest search engine on the internet. – Upload quality music videos and vlogs! Add a bunch of tags, and have long descriptions with links to your social media accounts. Interact with people and reply to every comment! The more videos you have the better!

SoundCloud is a great website to post and share your music on! A lot of up and coming artists build their fan base by using SoundCloud alone. Users can like and share your songs! I used SoundCloud and I highly recommend you using it too! It is a great and easy way for your fans to listen to your music. You can share the links and it will lead people straight to your song! Soundcloud Marketing Video

Instagram is the fastest growing social media website. Post a link of your YouTube or SoundCloud in your bio and watch your plays / views grow! Upload 15 second videos of your songs! Like and comment on other artist's pictures and videos! Interact with other people and artists! They will most likely click on your page and check you out! Users can also repost your music and pictures! The more pictures you like and comment on, the better!

The other sites like Facebook, Snapchat, and Twitter also play a major role in marketing your music online. Twitter can be used to keep your fans and followers updated on your latest music! Facebook can be used to interact with friends and fans on a more personal level. It gives you an opportunity to write a long post and speak your mind. Snapchat is another fast growing social media site! It is a great way to have fun with your friends and fans by posting many videos and pictures! Again, it is hard to manage every single one of these! That is why I advise you to pick at least 3 and stick with them! Which leads me to my last tip

— Tip # 3: Consistency —

This is the hardest and most important step. You have to be consistent. On social media, you have to upload content daily, and you must upload songs / videos weekly! We live in a fast pace world and we need to grab peoples attention! And how do we do that? By being consistent! Remember, nothing happens over night. But if you stay consistent and use these tips, you will begin to see results in no time! Be patient! If you are expecting over night success, it will not happen. Alicia Keys said, “My over night success took me 16 years.” Marketing your music online will definitely help speed up the process though. There are SO many other tips but these are just a few simple ones.

Also

Making remixes to popular songs that are out on the radio can definitely help you get more views!

P.F Sloan and Steve Barri

Whilst you may not immediately recognize the name, PF Sloan, there's every chance that submerged somewhere in the depths of your record collection, sometimes in the section reserved solely for the 1960s, you'll find a song written by the gifted teenage composer, or indeed, even a track or two recorded by him, under one of…

Whilst you may not immediately recognize the name, PF Sloan, there's every chance that submerged somewhere in the depths of your record collection, sometimes in the section reserved solely for the 1960s, you'll find a song written by the gifted teenage composer, or indeed, even a track or two recorded by him, under one of his many pseudonyms.

Phil Sloan, as he was then known, already had a false start as a singer behind him when he was signed as a staff writer for the West Coast branch of Screen Gems in 1964, at the splendid tender age of eighteen. He was immediately teamed with another young songwriter, Steve Barri, and together they wrote, in quick succession, a stream of Billboard 100 hits, in a wide variety of genres, ranging from R & B and folk-rock to girl group and surf-pop. Sadly, a simmering feud with Dunhill Records' President, Jay Lasker, which was considerably the by-product of Sloan's understandable desire to perform under his own name, led to his being altogether dismissed from the fledgling label at the back end of 1967. Barri , who'd always been content with his role as a writer / producer, went on to become the label's Head of A & R before taking up the same post with Warner Bros. Records. He currently earns a crust touring the college circuit lecturing on the history of rock 'n' roll.

After releasing a couple of solo albums, Measure for Pleasure (1968) and Raised on Records (1972), Sloane simply disappeared without a trace. He has subsequently admitted to being 'desolate and mentally ill' for long periods. A review in the LA Times of a 1993 gig at the Troubadour, in West Hollywood, to promote his comeback album (Still on the) Eve of Destruction, suggests that his problems may not have been completely behind him even then:

'Unfortunately, Sloan's eccentric performing mannerisms too often jarred uncomfortably against the more attractive qualities of his songs. Constantly in motion, full of nervous tics and movements, chewing gum incessantly, he frequently interrupted the flow of the music with long, out-of-focus stories that were disconnected to the point of disassociation. As the evening wore on, he has often added aggressive harangues in support of a vague socio-political agenda '.

He has previously recorded just one more album, Sailover, in 2006.

His incredible work rate at Dunhills, in the years precedent his devastating breakdown, must have taken their toll. Between 1964 and 1967 he penned, in partnership with Barri, hits for some of the decade's biggest acts, including The Searchers, The Mamas and Papas, The Fifth Dimension, The Turtles, Herman's Hermits and Johnny Rivers. In addition, his anguished protest song “Eve of Destruction”, written in the wake of the Cuban Missile Crisis, was a world-wide smash for Barry McGuire. He also charted in the UK under his own name or at least, his latest variation of it, PF Sloan, for the first and last time, when his Dylanesque pot-boiler 'The Sins of a Family' reached no 38 in 1965.

Throughout the Dunhill years, Sloan was also recording around the clock with Barri, under such group names as The Lifeguards, The Wildcats, Sheridan Hollenbeck Orchestra and Chorus, Phillip and Stephan, Willie & the Wheels, The Fantastic Baggys, Themes Inc., The Street Cleaners and The Grass Roots. The Fantastic Baggys, perhaps the best of these side-projects, cut a truly wonderful surf pop album, Tell Em I'm Surfin 'in 1964, which is still considered today as one of the best albums in the genre's history. When he was not writing or recording songs, on an industrial scale, Sloan was busy playing guitar on a multitude of other seminal records, including The Mamas and Papas' all time classic “California Dreaming.”

It all ended in tears, of course, as Sloan's insistence on moving center stage absolutely cost him his Dunhill career. His attempt to “ride the lightning bolt between creativity and commerciality” was over at the age of 22. An alternative reading of his boy / girl break-up song, “Let me Be”, which the Turtles took to no. 28 on the Billboard chart in 1965 may, in hindsight, be seen as defining his attitude to art in general and in particular his on-going conflict with Lasker;

'Please do not mistake me or try to make me / the shadow of anyone else / I is not the him or her you think I am / I'm just trying hard to be myself … And I'm not a pawn to be told how to move / I'm sorry I is not the fool you thought would play by your rules'.

If this was a verbal warning or a plea for understanding that he no longer wanted to be considered as a “gun for hire”, then the power-brokers at Dunhill were past caring.

This 2010, 25 track compilation, lovingly put together by Ace Records, includes all the essential cuts from his halcyon days, together with less familiar offerings like the “The Sh-Down Song”, credited to The Ginger Snaps featuring Dandee Dawson, “Summer Means Fun “by future Beach Boy Bruce Johnston, Ramona King's no-nonsense slap down,” You Say Pretty Words “and a wounded Anne-Margaret, delivering the goods on” You Sure Know How to Hurt Someone “. In addition, the album comes with a superbly informative and well presented booklet that answers some of the questions surrounding the enigmatic Sloan.

This includes a particularly poignant anecdote, concern sixties' soft pop exponents The Association, represented on You Baby by their version of Sloane's 1967 composition, “On a Quiet Night”, which bears repeating in this review. Headlining a show by the National Association of Songwriters in 1992, Sloan was intrigued to hear The Association play the song “P. F Sloan”, which legendary songwriter Jimmy Webb had penned as a tribute to him, way back in 1970. When Sloan went backstage to introduce himself to the band, they refused to believe he was the subject of the song, insist PF Sloan was a fictional character! It should be noted that Webb, for whatever procedural reason, had fueled rumours that PF Sloan was, in fact, a figment of his imagination. The lyrics themselves are suitably vague –

'I have been seeking PF Sloan / But no one knows where he has gone / No one ever heard the song / that good old boy sent winging / Last time I saw PF Sloan / He was summer burned and winter blown / He turned the corner all alone / But he continued singing '.

It can be easy to forget, so many years after the event, that through the 'mid' 60s', Sloan and Barri were helping to define and codify the burgeoning language of pop, in exactly the same way that the likes of Chuck Berry and Buddy Holly had done for Rock n 'Roll a decade earlier. The song titles alone re-construct a familiar narrative – “Anywhere the Girls Are”, “I Found a Girl”, “Summer Means Fun”, “Without You Care”, “Where Were You When I Needed You”, “Another Day , Another Heartache “,” Only When You're Lonely “,” Things I Should Have Said “and” All I Want is Loving “- by evoking the testosterone angst, the hormonal heartbreak, the teen trauma of the day.

You Baby not only chronicles the best work of an exceptionally gifted song-writing partnership, it serves, too, as a glorious reminder of pop music's salad days.

* For those wishing to delve a little deeper into the work of PF Sloan, Ace released a collection of Sloane's own Dunhill records, Here's Where I Belong: The Best of the Dunhill Years 1965 to 1967, back in 2008 and Sloane co-wrote his life story, with SE Feinberg, in the entertaining, if somewhat unreliable autobiography, What's Exactly the Matter with Me: Memoirs of a Life in Music.

The Right Eyewear Glasses Can Provide The Exact Onstage Look For Any Performer

Eyewear – no matter if a performer is in theater, movies, or music, the right eye fashion (glasses) can be the most important part of the performance whether it is live onstage or a photo on a CD cover – the look can make or break the performance. When it comes to great eyewear on…

Eyewear – no matter if a performer is in theater, movies, or music, the right eye fashion (glasses) can be the most important part of the performance whether it is live onstage or a photo on a CD cover – the look can make or break the performance.

When it comes to great eyewear on album / CD covers nobody will ever come close to the signature glasses that John Lennon started starting around the time of Sgt. Pepper. Those glasses were first given to him as a prop for his role in the movie, “How I Won The War” filmed in 1966. That particular style is called the Windsor and were the glasses generally given out by the British National Health Service, in other words cheap.

But other performers also have their own signature eyewear. Cary Grant for instance always favored a heavy black framed style of glasses much like Roy Orbison or Rivers Cuomo of Weezer, not to mention Buddy Holly, who of course John Lennon himself worshiped, which is why the Beatles are called the Beatles in honor of Buddy Holly's band, The Crickets. On the other end of that spectrum, Lisa Loeb also wears black frames but much lighter in style – and she looks as great as she sounds.

Jerry Garcia always worn tinted glasses while onstage with the Grateful Dead as Ozzy Osbourne, who onstage glasses look a lot like Janice Joplin's onstage glasses, but nothing was as cool as Lennon's everyday glasses

But the main thing for musicians trying to make a statement while wearing glasses onstage, is to be as unique as possible while being functional. For instance almost all musicians onstage need to have some kind of tinting in order to combat the bright lights that beam into the performers eyes onstage. Ringo Starr and Bono both use different color of tinting and levels of tinting according to the particular show or photo shoot they are doing. Many times musicians need to make adjustments to their equipment so a good level of magnification is necessary even if you are using reading glasses. Another important factor is that the glasses fit right so that they do not fall off while you are dancing around.

As for the band Stavros – they use glasses provided by Reading Glasses Etc. because after all their slogan is, “Ridiculously Cool Glasses,” and one of the most important parts of a live performance is to look as cool as possible – even ridiculously cool. And even if you are not performing onstage – it never hurts to look like you could be onstage, because everyone wants that cool look