How Various Amplifier Types Differ in Working and Usage

An amplifier is majorly used to increase the power of signal. It is an electronic audio device with an input signal either in the form of voltage or current. There are a wide range of electronic amplifiers which are being most commonly used in radio and also television transmitters. The home theater amplifier components can…

An amplifier is majorly used to increase the power of signal. It is an electronic audio device with an input signal either in the form of voltage or current. There are a wide range of electronic amplifiers which are being most commonly used in radio and also television transmitters.

The home theater amplifier components can help us to create high-end home theater environment. The features of surround sound preamplifiers are different from that of the home theater amplifier.

The amplifiers used in home theaters are with different features which help to facilitate customers and fulfill their high end audio sound requirements. There are many different types of electronic components such as integrated amplifiers, stereo preamplifiers, tuners and receivers used in multi room environment. The CD player and DVD feature adds advantage to the amplifier home theater.

To brief about the home theater amplifier which is also referred to as the power amplifier reason being it can be independently powered. Whenever any audio information is sent to the amplifier from any A / V receiver or decoders, it is then sent as separate audio channel.

Now let us discuss the various types of amplifiers one by one:

• Integrated amplifiers: An integrated amplifier basically consist of a typical amplifier and a preamplifier combined into a single box. Because of this combination of a preamplifier and amplifier it is very easy and convenient to use it.

• Preamplifiers: This one helps in the reception and processing of the audio signal from various input sources which are DVD or CD player. If the audio signal is low or weak, the preamplifier can very well adjust the voltage to keep it inline. It can accurately accept the signal.

• Vacuum Tube Amplifiers: These circuits use vacuum tubes as the major source for amplification and also can not be directly connected to a loudspeaker, as it requires an additional output transformer used to match tube to the speaker.

• Car Amplifiers: These amplify the output of the stereo system of car. This is added up to the power source of sound system, and technically it can modulate the power which is generated from car battery. This type of vehicle amp can also be used with any model or stereo.

• Guitar Amplifiers: These are electronic amplifiers used in electrical instruments such as guitars. It is also of two types the combination amplifier with the amplifier head and guitar speakers in one single unit. Also the amplifier head consists of electronic circuitry which constituents of the preamp and power amplifier.

• Power Amplifiers: The main purpose of using a power amplifier is to take the signal from a source device and amplify it to make it suitable for driving a loudspeaker. This in turn results in the difference in the amplitude of the input signal and the output signal.

Amplifiers and its types have brought in many revolutions in the audio industry to meet the needs of high end audio users.

Mechanical License: Get It and Cover Your Favorite Song

A mechanical license is an agreement secured from the copyright owner and the songwriter for an original song to be covered, distributed, and sold. The covering recording artist pays royalty money to the parties involved in making his or her cover for the song available commercially. If you are a recording artist or an aspiring…

A mechanical license is an agreement secured from the copyright owner and the songwriter for an original song to be covered, distributed, and sold. The covering recording artist pays royalty money to the parties involved in making his or her cover for the song available commercially. If you are a recording artist or an aspiring one, being familiar with the steps you need to take to start is important. Know that if a song is in public domain, meaning, it is no longer protected by copyright, you are not required to obtain a mechanical license. The same applies to original materials that you have written. Here are the steps to obtain a mechanical license.

1. Keep a list of the songs you wanted to cover. Get its publisher and songwriter information. You may get publisher information through existing organizations like Broadcast Music, Incorporated.

2. Categorize the song you wanted to cover. Songs from opera, movie soundtracks, and musical scores are licensed under a different agreement type.

3. Submit a request for a mechanical license request. This can be done electronically online or in writing. Instant, online mechanical licensing, is handled by companies. You simply fill in a few basic fields about the song you want to license and you are on your way to license a cover song instantly!

4. Note that a mechanical license is only valid for audio form only. If you wish to use your cover song for a public performance or have it incorporated in a visual medium, you will be required to get a different license.

5. Get a compulsory mechanical license if you want to make your own creative arrangement of the musical piece you are covering. Keep in mind that a compulsory mechanical license does not allow you to make changes to the basic melody or character of the original song you are covering and getting a mechanical license for. A fee is also required per song you want to cover.

6. Pay the corresponding mechanical royalty to the licensing agency for distribution to the publisher and the songwriter. Do not forget to give credit to the original recording artist of the song for goodwill.

7. If you wish to perform your cover of the song in public, you may get in touch with a performance right group to provide the license for you.

– 9.10 cents for musical pieces five minutes or less
– 1.75 cents for musical pieces longer than five minutes

Any number of seconds in excess will be rounded to the next minute. The rates above are called the statutory rate, which is multiplied by the length of the song multiplied by the number of manufactured copies. But when licensing online instantly you wont need to handle fees as the licensing agency handles it for you. Also when you are working with the online mechanical licensing agency in getting to clear your cover songs, they offer separate accounts depending on the number of copies you wanted to be made from your cover song. Whether it's more or less than 2,500.00, this will give you a rough estimate of the revenues you will generate and the amount of mechanical royalty you will be paying.

What Do I Need To Build a Home Recording Studio on a Budget?

First … Do you really want to do this? Do you have the money to do this? And are you committed to getting it done? To do this right you need to spend some time determining what you need and can grow with, in addition to your constraints and budget. I'm assuming you've got a…

First … Do you really want to do this? Do you have the money to do this? And are you committed to getting it done? To do this right you need to spend some time determining what you need and can grow with, in addition to your constraints and budget. I'm assuming you've got a passion and burning desire to make your own music, or produce music for others … If that's the case, then you should have just enough inspiration to get there.

So, given you have a capable computer and recording software also known as DAW software, you'll want to build your home studio with the following:

Audio Interface : $ 100-500 A quality two channel (or more) audio interface which you can get for about $ 100-500, the interface will combine onboard preamps, analog to digital converters, and drivers with inputs and outputs.

Something like the apogee duet, is always a high quality choice, as it has a breakout box, instrument (input) for guitar, and everything you need really.

Remember, the best practice of leveraging the home studio is to build the best (2 or more) high quality signal chain and then route everything through that.

Microphone : $ 100- $ 300 So you need a microphone, and typically a large diaphragm condenser mic will be the best and most versatile, and can be had on the cheap. You can search for “budget condensers” on google, in forums, and ask the guys at guitar center, and everyone will have their own – “OMG, this is the best budget condenser mic” opinion … Thing is, they are a lot of great sounding budget mics in this category. Best to try a few out. Once you can tell what the mic is missing, or what characteristic you'd like to improve on, THEN you can start looking for another one. By the way, make sure you get shockmount to help reduce vibrations, shakes, and other handling of the mic from being picked up and effecting the sound.

MIDI Keyboard Controller: $ 100-200 Your midi keyboard controller looks like any other keyboard, but its less expensive and does not actually produce any sound. It is used to send data to your computer. This data is used to trigger sound samples and patches. Midi data is the code that translates what notes you hit, how hard you press the keys, how long, and other parameters, that get recorded and then relayed back through the sound module and out your speakers.

Studio Monitors: $ 200-500 You're going to want to get “nearfield studio monitors,” and ideally “active” vs passive. This means that they are powered without having to purchase an amplifier. These look like fancy speakers, and they are certainly more expensive than your desktop speakers, but their goal is to produce as natural, and as close a sound as possible to the actual sound you are producing. You want a flat response, no fluff, no excess bass. The goal for your monitors is to be as transparent as possible. This means, that if there are problems they are not masked, and you can address them and figure out how to correct them. They are your reference to your mixes, so you may hear them called reference monitors.

Headphones : $ 50-100 Headphones are what you'll use to record audio, and sometimes use when you have to keep the noise down. “Closed back” headphones will help keep the noise inside the cans, which will reduce “bleed” through to your headphones. You can pick up some nice “closed back” headphones like Sennheiser 280's which are a staple, and overall can not go wrong with.

Pop filter : $ 10-50 You'll want a pop filter to reduce plosives “P's” and excessive sibilance “S's” when singing. It will also help protect your mic from singers eating it, and spitting into it and any other thing that could damage your capsule.

Cables : $ 20-100 Do not forget about cables. Depending on how big you need them to be, they will vary and usually cost by the foot. Depending on what gear you go with, you'll probably need at least 2x 1/4 TRS (balanced) for the monitors, and XLR (male-female) for each microphone.

Home Studio Gear Principles and Tips

You have to know how invested you are in this, and what results you really want. Ultimately, you are going to have to learn your gear and develop your ear before you are going to get the sounds you want. Do not pull your hair out, get the best gear you can afford and learn how to make the most of it.

Keep it simple. Buy only what you plan to, and expand only when you know you need to.

Quick signal flow basics …

You have a microphone, which plugs into a soundcard / audio interface, which turns your signal into a binary code and stores on your hard drive. It is routed through to your software, outputs through the stereo bus, and then you hear it either through the playback of your “speakers,” (which are called “monitors” in the recording studio by the way) or through headphones.

You have a midi keyboard which sends digital data through a midi interface to your computer and routes to your DAW software which then trigger samples or patches of stored sound from your plugins or standardone software and plays back through your outputs and into your ears through your monitors or headphones.

How Do I Hook Everything Up and Use It All?

Having gone through an elaborate process of building my home studio piece by piece over the last 8 years, I've gained the insight and the experience needed to help simplify and guide you along setting your own recording rig. You can find the free article series here -> Guide To The Home Studio .

Tips About How to Get a Record Deal

If you are an aspiring pop star, singer or musician you may want to get a record deal to get your name known and turned into a household name. This can prove to be a difficult task for many especially if you are from a small town. Your chances of winning a record deal by…

If you are an aspiring pop star, singer or musician you may want to get a record deal to get your name known and turned into a household name. This can prove to be a difficult task for many especially if you are from a small town. Your chances of winning a record deal by entering a contest are slim and nobody records a demo and sends it to various record labels expecting to hear back positive word within a week. Times have changed and the atmosphere for getting a record deal has changed as well.

The world of music and showmanship now involves a lot of digital creations with social networking and instant communication very much after after an artist you have the ability to reach your desired target in just a couple minutes using any of these tools or the most popular YouTube. At the moment this looks like the ideal thing to do and you may have even done it already but the truth is after posting your music on YouTube you are still a far cry from getting that record deal that you so desire. There are a couple of things you need to know about getting a record deal.

1. Getting a record deal is not just about getting exposure, you can find exposure with Facebook likes and Twitter followers or YouTube video comments but these people that you are exposing yourself to are not the ones who can get you the record label deal so why even bother to invest too much time in that. Well you want to still keep up your social following you may say. There is nothing wrong with that just remember that getting the record deal is your ultimate goal.

2. The people offering the record deals have not changed their methods. They are not looking for you on YouTube and Facebook but instead are attending live performances to find that new thing “golden ticket”.

But how do you get A & R executives to see that you have a lot of promise and are worth being under their wings. How do you get into these performance shows that they attend so that they can actually see what you are made of? The answer is simple you need to be persevering. You want to impress upon these executives that you do not stop at the first sign of a glitch and that you have the desire to make it big in the industry.

You will need to show that you are not willing to back down until you have had your voice heard. Start doing live performances and get merchandise made to advertise yourself. Finance your albums and have them for sale even if it is just from your car. Ensure that you take copies with you to performances so that you can sell them afterwards as well. Do everything within your power to get people to be interested with you. Doing this long enough will allow you to get the recognition you need to get that record deal.

Landing Music Industry Jobs or a Record Deal in the Digital Age

The Music Industry as everyone knew it slowly over a decade ago has undergone a revolution. The core middleman in the music industry that we came to know from the 50s to the mid-90s was always the record company aka the record label. During that time period, the label had access to the platforms of…

The Music Industry as everyone knew it slowly over a decade ago has undergone a revolution. The core middleman in the music industry that we came to know from the 50s to the mid-90s was always the record company aka the record label. During that time period, the label had access to the platforms of sales and distribution, and possibly more importantly the label had virtual monopolistic access to marketing and the means for discovering new talent. Amazingly, this was severely the limit of the record company's control.

From the perspective of the many who dreamed of landing music industry jobs, the road leads through the many areas of influence or outright ownership of the big record company. The acts themselves relied on the label to take their talent and turn it into money. The record deal was the coveted result for securing monetary return for the artist's work. It appeared to all, that labels were the only ones who knew the path.

Fast forward to the music industry of today and with it the emergence of the internet as a platform for sharing and distributing musical content digitally. Now the artists can go directly to the people in minutes without the help of middlemen. This has lessened the value of the record deal and records in general. The value now is more centered in the personage and original unique content of the musician. This is because the content of the records themselves are shared broadly on a free platform (the internet).

This has served to decrease the value of the traditional record, tape or cd. While this technology trend has actually empowered musicians who choose to capitalize on it, it has greatly muddied the waters for people who are searching for a traditional music industry job. With labels generally contracting trying to figure out their most profitable place in the post-internet world, vertical integration and traditional jobs have become scarcer.

With all that said, the formula for making it in the music industry still comes down to the basics of attacking passionately and following through with dogged determination. The same fundamentals apply for either more conventional employment or in the form of someone paying you for your artistic work. When asked once what the secret to life was, legendary rock musician Bruce Springsteen was said to have commented: “Find what really makes you happy and stick with it.” This concept is actually the basis for success in the music industry. Remember that the music industry itself is based on the difficult to quantify tastes of individuals. These tastes are ever-shifting. Even in the glory days of stability, the record-label dominated industry was constantly in flux. Today it is much more chaotic.

So knowing that, when looking for a music industry position, you first want to clearly understand what you are really passionate about. Then when you choose that aspect of the music industry, use the internet to understand the trends and future outlook. The most important question you will want to answer about your passion is: where is the greatest area of ​​need and where can I focus my efforts to give the greatest value within my area of ​​interest? Then you must be very willing to do whatever it takes, including working for no compensation to prove your worth to break in with music industry jobs. The rewards of being able to spend your days doing something you love will be well worth the sacrifices at the beginning. A cool secret about initial sacrifice is that it does not feel like sacrifice because you are knee deep pursuing what you love.

Now if you are a musician and you want to get a record deal, the idea of ​​pursuing your dream is probably already deeply ingrained. You are hopefully very experienced in having people critique your work positively and negatively. Even with the new technologies emerging, getting a record deal is still a very relevant goal. The relationship that you should want to create with a label within the music industry is collaborative. Do not fall into the trap of being the servant or begging for the existence of the relationship thinking it will answer all your financial problems.

Today's musician must be knowledgeable about how to control his entire production and distribution as if the record labels do not even exist. This knowledge building process will invariably create a deep understanding of the business side of the industry. The use of digital technology and online distribution will also allow the musician to create his own buzz and identity. This is power for you as an artist in the process of growing a brand and often partnering (not serving) with a record label in a business relationship.

Music Industry Predictions for Unsigned Artists for 2012

2012 has numerous (Mayan-related) predictions attached to it so I'm going to get into the spirit of things and have a go at anticipating what the year has in store for the music industry. One thing that I do not think will change much is that Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are still going to be…

2012 has numerous (Mayan-related) predictions attached to it so I'm going to get into the spirit of things and have a go at anticipating what the year has in store for the music industry.

One thing that I do not think will change much is that Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are still going to be the primary social networking hubs for musicians. I imagine that there will be an increase in tools that allow you to link social networking sites, schedule your content and add your music more easily since there still is not a perfect solution out there for doing this. One new network that looks set to grow in 2012 is chime.in so I would strongly recommend getting over to their site and claiming your url as soon as possible.

Video should take on an even more important role than ever as bands compete for online attention. My recommendation for bands in 2012 is to add as much creative content as they can to their YouTube / Vimeo / Muzu accounts, whether it be live performances, interviews or vlogs. Live streaming of performances is also becoming easier and more affordable for many bands so I expect to see an increase in online gigs, something that has never really taken off in a big way. Sales of videos are increasing on iTunes too despite you can turn out HD videos on an extremely low-budget then for the most part you're still not going to get your investment back.

Mobile should play an ever larger part this year. So far the ringtone market has been pretty small with only major artists really benefiting. However I think we'll see an increase in people downloading audio and video content to their phones. It's getting easier to create apps now too as more companies spring up that bypass the need to know coding. They can still work out a little costly at present but I expect to see a couple of new, more affordable solutions in the coming months.

2012 should see an increase in the number of cloud based services. Making music easier to store and move between different services online without the need for download and upload would benefit numerous musicians and small record labels. There's a definite gap in the market here that I'm sure someone will jump in and develop this, possibly an already established service such as SoundCloud.

One prediction is that more people will be using streaming services over the coming year and although Spotify has had some negative feedback, I personally know of one small label that makes most of their monthly revenue from them. It ill be interesting to see how Spotify address the issue of revenue share in the coming months. It would be great to see a streaming service interact more with the major social networking sites in order to encourage the discovery of new music.

There's likely to be an increase in the quality and quantity of live performances in the coming months. Musicians playing their own music have always had to perform for free and try to make up their revenue through sales of CDs and merchandise at gigs. The internet provided an alternative means of income without having to leave the house and has made a few bands lazy. However, royalties have always been and still will be one of the largest forms of income for musicians and I expect to see a lot more bands getting back out on the road in 2012.

We may see the demise of a few more giants in the industry – there's a talk of a merger between two of the remaining three majors, plus many sub-labels are being absorbed as labels try to cut down on their overheads. HMV is likely heading for another tough year too and would benefit very much from allowing local artists to place their CDs in store on a sale or return basis – something that I do not predict will happen but I would really like to be surprised here!

Finally, there just has to be a new music show in 2012. Sod X-Factor, I'm talking about a proper music show like TheTube, Jools Holland, Ready Steady Go and The Old Gray Whistle Test – the industry seriously needs a new TV outlet that caters for all music, not just the conveyorbelt out of major labels / Syco that are constantly shoved in our faces.

That's it from me, I'm going to check back on this post in 12 months time and see how I fared. In the meantime, feel free to add your own predictions.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

What Makes Vintage Acoustic Guitars One of a Kind?

There is an unexplainable charm when you create music out of a vintage acoustic guitar. The sound seems to echo years of past musical pieces and yet is still a great instrument to play to date. Most vintage guitars are made of high quality materials that are made to last. If you were to compare…

There is an unexplainable charm when you create music out of a vintage acoustic guitar. The sound seems to echo years of past musical pieces and yet is still a great instrument to play to date. Most vintage guitars are made of high quality materials that are made to last. If you were to compare brand new acoustic guitars from these guitars, you can easily see and hear what collectors and guitar enthusiasts mean.

What makes these guitars better than other acoustic guitars?

These guitars have several reasons why they live in the hearts of many songwriters and guitar players all over the world:

• Vintage guitars are most likely made of very strong wood like maple and mahogany which definitely retain its shape and sound for years to come. This is of course possible only when these guitars are well taken care for.

• Each vintage guitar is a work of art. Acoustic guitars today are mostly commercially manufactured but back in the good old days, every musical instrument is a product of fine craftsmanship made over countless man hours of labor and perfection. Owning a vintage guitar or any type of vintage instrument is definitely a privilege.

Any cons of owning this type of guitar?

These guitars are considered priceless possessions. It is a must there before to take extra care in storing, handling and keeping it clean. Apart from this, restoring a vintage guitar or any musical instrument may also be quite expensive since it is often done by expert antique or vintage instrument restorers. Another cons of purchasing a vintage guitar whether acoustic or electric is the authenticity of your find. You need to have a vintage or antique appraiser to check the guitar out so you can be sure that what you are buying is indeed a vintage. A true blue vintage acoustic guitar increases its value when cared for and maintained.

Caring for these guitars

These guitars need lots of TLC considering it is a prescribed possession indeed. If you intend to display your treasure then have an antique restorer take care of it first. Remove the strings and loosen the neck part to remove any strain on the neck and the body of the guitar. Store or display your antique acoustic guitar on a sturdy case or you may have it placed on a stand. Any type guitar requires adequate humidity to maintain the shape of the soundbox. If you intend to play your vintage guitar however, take extra care when handling it and refrain from any harmful chemicals from spilling on the finish like varnish, nail polish, insect repellant and even sweat. Only through careful hands can such a guitar last for more years to come.

Making Musical Masterpieces With a Vintage Bass Guitar

What do vintage bass guitars sound like? Why is it preferred by some popular musical performers to use rather than a new one? There is certainly a certain charm in using vintage musical instruments and these guitars are no exception. These fine pieces of art and perfection may never be found in stores and musical…

What do vintage bass guitars sound like? Why is it preferred by some popular musical performers to use rather than a new one? There is certainly a certain charm in using vintage musical instruments and these guitars are no exception. These fine pieces of art and perfection may never be found in stores and musical instrument shops anymore but only in auction sites and in private collections. They are certainly perfect to create musical masterpieces together with other vintage guitars.

How do you know it is a vintage?

Only a trained eye may be able to spot a vintage bass guitar. If this is your first time to buy vintage or antique musical instruments here are a few tips on how to take home a vintage:

• If you plan to purchase a vintage musical instrument, talk to the previous owner about the history of the instrument. In the case of a bass guitar, take note of the brand, the model and the finish. Owners may not be 100% reliable especially when they want to make you believe you are buying vintage instruments so it is best to do your homework before you make your purchase.

• Make your own research on the many vintage guitars; you can easily do this online through vintage guitar sites and even in many guitar forums and support sites.

• You can hire a vintage or antique musical instrument appraiser to check and find out before you purchase.

• You can also get more information on this guitar from auction sites.

A cut above the rest

Most of these guitars are definitely a cut above the rest, they sound better and even feel better when you play. Designs are also what set a vintage among other type of bass guitars. These guitars are usually intricately designed and when you look at these guitars form the 60's and 70's they are mostly larger and curvier than the usual guitar body we see today. The finish of a vintage bass guitar is perfection and the body is made of strong hard wood like maple with or without a laminate finish.

Vintage bass guitars: to use or not to use?

If you are considering of owning this type of guitar it is important to determine first if you are going to use it or just display it. As with collectors, they take pride in owning high quality vintage guitars and musical instruments but are sometimes taken aback on how much it would take to afford an antique restorer. It may take a fortune to hire professional restorers so it is definitely best to do a little research on the field. As with maintaining a guitar of high value, it may also be similar to a vintage acoustic guitar. Loosen strings and threads before keeping them to keep the body and the neck in perfect playing condition. An acoustic bass guitar will give you years of playing perfection if they are cared for and maintained properly.

Plugs and Cables For The Home Studio

1/4 “Analog The most common and popular cord you may recognize is the 1/4 inch analog plug. They are two flavors mono, known as TS, (Tip sleeve) and stereo, known as TRS (Tip Ring Sleeve) 1/4 TS – mono (unbalanced) The main thing about the T / S cable is that is a single channel,…

1/4 “Analog

The most common and popular cord you may recognize is the 1/4 inch analog plug. They are two flavors mono, known as TS, (Tip sleeve) and stereo, known as TRS (Tip Ring Sleeve)

1/4 TS – mono (unbalanced)

The main thing about the T / S cable is that is a single channel, which is also called mono, and you do not want to confuse or misuse instrument cables vs speaker cables.

Uses : Instrument connections ie guitar / synth, power amp, and speaker connections.

Instrument cords which contain a wire and a shield, which helps to minimize the noise, is different from speaker cords which carry more power, and does not have a shield.

1/4 TRS – stereo

A stereo cord, or Tip Ring Sleeve (TRS) cord, contains two separate channels and left and a right.

The advantage of balanced cords is that you can run longer cables without adding excess noise to a signal.

Uses : Headphones, audio equipment and gear that requires balanced connections. A TRS Y cord can also be used for inserting effects and signal processors to the line in on a mixer.

XLR – These are used for microphones and line connections in some cases. The male and female ends are different, and carries a low impedance signal. XLR cables are balanced.

RCA – These are also called phono plugs, and are often found on home stereo's, they are like a TS plug, and are not very common in pro audio equipment. RCA plugs are also used for Digital S / PDIF signals.

ADAT Lightpipe – This allows you to send 8 tracks of digital audio at one time through a fiber optic cable.

TDIF – TDIF is a competitive format for ADAT, designed by TEAC, not nearly as common as ADAT, and uses a 25 pin connector.

S / PDIF – Uses an unbalanced coaxial cable and RCA plugs. S / PDIF can transfer two channels of digital data at one time. S / PDIF is a more well known option, but similar to AES / EBU connectors.

AES / EBU – (Audio Engineering Society / European Broadcasting Union) AES cables are similar to S / PDIF, and can allow you to transmit two channels of data at one time. AES uses a balanced XLR, unlike S / PDIF

Firewire – AKA IEEE 1394 / iLink, Firewire is probably the fastest connection format between computers and digital devices. Firewire was made by Apple, and is common on a large range of equipment by an expansive range of companies. Firewire cables have the same connectors on both sides.

Firewire 400: Data transfer speeds are up to 400 Mbps.

Firewire 800 : Transfer speeds of up to 800 Mbps.

Uses:

A connection format between electronic equipment used to transfer data, typically from a device to a computer.

USB – (Universal Serial Bus) Just about every computer today has at least one or two USB ports. It is a heavy popular and convenient format for connecting interfaces, (audio & midi) controllers, midi keyboards, external hard drives, printers directly to your computer. The “A” (recieving) and “B” (sending) connectors look a little different is size and shape.

USB 1.0: The standard, it is the original and can handle a 12 Megabits per second data rate.

USB 2.0: The new standard, it can process 40x the data flow – 480 Mbps.

Because of the significantly faster transfer speeds USB 2.0 is quickly becoming the new standard format for new gear on the market.

Uses:

A connection format between electronic equipment used to transfer data, typically from a device to a computer.

MIDI – (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) Is a standardized protocol used to shuttle informational data between devices. MIDI cables transfer the data from gear to gear through two MIDI connectors, the male end with 5 pins, which goes into the female MIDI jack (port) on the device.

Equalization Introduction

EQ Primer There are 6 main types of EQ. In this primer, we will outline many of the pro's and con's of each type. As well, we will discuss some of the primary uses of each type. The primary types of EQ's are as follows: Graphic EQ Parametric EQ Dynamic EQ Shelving EQ Band Pass…

EQ Primer

There are 6 main types of EQ. In this primer, we will outline many of the pro's and con's of each type. As well, we will discuss some of the primary uses of each type.

The primary types of EQ's are as follows:
Graphic EQ
Parametric EQ
Dynamic EQ
Shelving EQ
Band Pass EQ
Notch Filters

Graphic EQ:
Graphic EQ's have a number of pre-selected bands, with a fixed center frequency, and a fixed bandwidth. It gives an operator a visual representation, but this crude representation, is not a very accurate method of EQing. Due to the way a Graphic EQ cuts / boosts each frequency, cutting multiple bands next to each other, can cause harmful comb filtering, where this can cause a ripple effect onto other frequencies that you do not wish to alter. With judicial application of a Graphic EQ, you can quickly cut a problem frequency, and correct for feedback issues. These are frequently used for system correction, or monitor systems. They are very useful for fast, but crude corrections.

Parametric EQ:
With a true parametric EQ, an operator will have four or more bands, with adjustable center frequencies, the width of the range of affected signal (also known as the Q), and the amount of boost or cut (the gain). If an EQ does not have all three of these adjustments, it is not a true Parametric EQ. Many lower cost consoles will have a semi-parametric EQ, or a three band EQ, with out Q control, or frequency sweep-ability. Some times they will be sweep-able in the mid-range, but not on all bands. Parametric EQ's are far more precise than many other EQ's and are generally preferred for fine tuning a system, or adjusting the sound of an input. They generally allow for more precise fine tuning with out affecting unnecessary redundancies. They are less prone to causing negative effects in a sound system.

Dynamic EQ:
Dynamic EQ's are not as common as the previous two examples. The Dynamic EQ is an EQ that changes the amount of cut or boost applied based around changes in the volume of the source being processed. Depending on the level of the source, you can have the EQ change how it reacts.

Notch Filters:
A Notch Filter is a very narrow EQ filter at a selected frequency, as to not affect nearby frequencies.

Band Pass Filters:
Usually you will find either a High Pass (only the frequencies above the selected point pass through), or a Low Pass (only the frequencies below the selected point pass through) Filter. These are excellent for cleaning up unwanted signal / noise on a source. On most vocal mics, you can engage a High Pass Filter, and roll it up to cut out frequencies outside of the human vocal range. This can be helpful for eliminating the sound of someone pounding on a lectern, or cutting ambient kick drum, or bass guitar from a vocal mic to clear up the sound. You can also use a High or Low Pass Filter if you are trying to clear up output sends to either Top or Subwoofers, although you are usually better off letting a crossover network do this for you. High and Low Pass Filters can be used to gain separation between microphones in a grand piano, one on the higher strings, and one on the lower strings. When using these filters in this manner, remember to apply the correct filter to the correct microphone. These filters are usually cut only, and at a fixed gain and Q.

Shelving Filters:
Shelving Filters are similar to High and Low Pass Filters, as they are applied to the outsides of the hearing spectrum. The primary difference, is that they can be either cut or boost, and they generally have a selectable gain and Q, as well as a selectable starting frequency.

Studio Monitors for Music Production

Studio monitors look like high tech, expensive speakers; and that's because, well, they are … But unlike an expensive stereo speaker system, they're purpose is much less fancy, and much more practical. The goal in any monitoring system is not to enhance the sound and produce the highest fidelity , it is to be as…

Studio monitors look like high tech, expensive speakers; and that's because, well, they are …

But unlike an expensive stereo speaker system, they're purpose is much less fancy, and much more practical. The goal in any monitoring system is not to enhance the sound and produce the highest fidelity , it is to be as transparent as possible.

Studio Monitors, also commonly referred to as reference monitors, are the means of translating the sounds and music you are mixing, so you want them to provide as accurate a translation as possible.

The obvious implication is that if you can hear whats wrong, you can fix it by learning to identify the source of the problem and then figuring out how to correct what is not sounding right.

The ability to successfully utilize your monitoring system comes with time and practice, and requires three things:

  • You understand and know the intricacies of your monitors.
  • A well developed ear-able to identify problems, both in a mix and with individual frequencies.
  • An understanding of how to use your DAW tools to effect, process, blend and mix frequencies

Most pro and home recordists intuitively learn their monitors, and corrective action becomes second nature. If you are not there yet, just give it time, be patient, and keep at it.

Near Field Studio Monitors

In a home studio environment, near-field monitors are most common and not extremely expensive. (Compared to some older PA systems and wall speakers the size of a porta-john.) Near field is a term that describes the distance between the monitoring speakers and the ear. This distance is generally known to be no more than 10 ft. from the ear.

Near-field monitors are an inexpensive way to directly listen to your sounds. Monitoring your tracks inside headphones can be done without much interruption during recording, but having external studio monitors is highly recommended for mixing and mastering. Using external monitors helps the ear to hear a more realistic overall stereo image. Thus, placing the tones and frequencies that make up the mix can be done with more precision.

Active and Passive Studio Monitors

There are two types of near-field studio monitors, active and passive . Passive monitors are simply monitors without an amplifier built into it. While active monitors come with an amplifier built in to directly power the speakers.

Reference Monitor Setup Tips

When mounting a pair of monitors, a good rule of thumb is to place them at ear level and set each monitor equal distance from each other as they are away from the listener / producer. To minimize unwanted mirrors, do not place studio monitors directly against or facing any walls. Spacing varies depending on a room's shape and size.

Summary

  • Studio monitors are a special form of speaker system designed to accurately reproduce an input signal. Not the computer screen used in your home recording studio.
  • The goal is to find a set of reference monitors that will allow you to measure the quality of your recordings until you are satisfied with a mix.
  • For most home studio environments near field reference monitors are what you're looking for.
  • Active studio monitors means that they are already powered, and require much less work and headache for you.

How to Make Money Using Free Beats

You are a producer. You have been producing for a while and you are starting to feel like your music is at a point right now where you are ready to start making some money off of it. There are a variety of ways to make money obviously the dream is to start producing for…

You are a producer. You have been producing for a while and you are starting to feel like your music is at a point right now where you are ready to start making some money off of it. There are a variety of ways to make money obviously the dream is to start producing for artist like Lil Wayne, and Jay-Z. Truth be told there are not that many people who are able to do that and that road is very difficult. Not saying you should not try but there may be other options to help you earn income off of your music.

If you are selling your beats on the internet you should think about doing another thing. Giving them away for free. You can sell all the non-exclusive license's that you want for 19.95 and that could be a great way for you to make some money. Sell ​​all the exclusive license's you want for 295 and that also could be a great way for you to make a lot of money. A great way for you to make a ton of money in the long term by using your free beats is to do the following. Develop a email list with a company like Aweber and entice people to sign up for the mailing list by giving them 5 free beats, or 20 free beats, or any number of free beats. Personally I am using 20 free beats to try to get the highest conversion rate of people on my website signing up. Now once you get these peoples email address not only is this going to help you convert sales of your exclusive and non-exclusive license's, but it is also going to give you a huge opportunity to reach out to your subscribers with other offers that could make you money.

Now if you have thousands of people signed up for your mailing think of the affiliate sales possibilities. You could blast your mailing list with offers from companies like Guitar Center, Dr. Jays, Lids and any other company that you think people who want rap beats would be interested in. If you get 1 percent of 1,000 people to actually go and buy something with the coupons you send out you could be looking at a big payout. Especially if they buy a 3,000 dollar keyboard.

Another way to make some money off your mailing list is to start reaching out to other producers to see if they would pay you to advertise their beats to your mailing list. If you have 2,000 people on your mailing list you could probably get at least 50 dollars in exchange for an email blast of their beat to your subscribers.

There are plenty of ways to earn money from giving away something for free. Just remember the power you have when you control peoples eyes. Happy beat making and good luck making that money!

School for Beats

Before I start this article I would like to clarify to people that I spent 5 years of my life studying Music Industry and Technology at Northeastern University in Boston. I did this because when I was done with high school the only thing I could think of wanting to do with my life is…

Before I start this article I would like to clarify to people that I spent 5 years of my life studying Music Industry and Technology at Northeastern University in Boston. I did this because when I was done with high school the only thing I could think of wanting to do with my life is make beats. When I look back on my experience and think about what I learned there are many ups and downs. To be completely honest I am still not sure if it was all worthwhile. Regardless I think that sharing my own experiences could help many other people with there decision making process.

First lets talk about the pros of going to school for beats. You are obviously going to get a large amount of technical knowledge that may be hard to teach yourself. Lets be honest who is really going to teach themselves music theory. That is one of those things that you really need to take in a class. So having the opportunity to go to a place that can give you classes like music theory, recording, digital audio, music history, music composition etc is really unique and important. Being able to utilize the ears of your professors and peers is something that is really going to make you grow more than anything else. Having a large group of people will hear you grow as a composer and producer is going to be crucial to your expanding and improving your sound.

The most important thing that going to school for you beats is going to be able to help you with is the relationships that you will develop both in school and outside of school. In school you will make a large group of friends that all have the same interests as you. These are people that will be getting jobs in the industry and will most likely be able to help further your career down the line. Outside of school you can utilize the schools relationships with their professional networks that may help you get an internship while in your school or a job while you are out of school. This is by far the most important thing that school will be able to do for you.

Now lets talk about some of the downsides of going to school for music. If you are going to a major university like a Northeastern University you are going to be looking at a very large amount of money to give you these opportunities. You may find yourself 10's of thousands of dollars in debt. This can be OK when you have a job out of school that pays you 60,000 a year but lets be honest. There are no jobs in the music industry that will pay you 60,000 a year right out of school. The only jobs like this do not actually require you to go to school in the first place.

To sum this all up I think that going to school for your beats can be a great idea. You get all sort of opportunities that you will only be able to get from a scholastic environment. I would warn you that you should make sure that you are 100% that you want to have a career in the music industry before you do this. If you are not 100% sure then go to school and study business or marketing and take some music classes on the side to fulfill your musical interests. Do not go and get a degree in music if you are going to have thousands of debt because you are going to find it extremely challenging to get out of the debt and you can create the same opportunities for yourself via other avenues.

Factors for Choosing a PSA Production Studio

People need to create PSAs for various reasons: for non-profit organizations, for radio shows or for different projects. Regardless of the reason, if you are looking to get a PSA produced, here are five qualities you should definitely look at when making your decision: 1. Will your needs be better suited with a large studio…

People need to create PSAs for various reasons: for non-profit organizations, for radio shows or for different projects. Regardless of the reason, if you are looking to get a PSA produced, here are five qualities you should definitely look at when making your decision:

1. Will your needs be better suited with a large studio or small, personalized one?

Many organizations looking to get PSAs produced have smaller budgets and are not able to afford the larger production studios. Because of this, it is a good idea to go with a smaller studio that will have the time to work with you and create the PSA you envision.

2. Do you get a good feeling about the people you will be working with at the PSA production studio?

Pay attention when you meet with the account person or studio employee you will be interacting with. Did they take the time to listen to what you hope to accomplish with your public service announcement, or did you feel rashed in explaining your concept? Did you get a good sense of their creativity and does it mesh with what you are looking for?

3. How much do their PSA production services cost?

While PSA production services do vary broadly, you should keep in mind that smaller studios are often able to charge less than their larger counterparts. For one, they are able to keep the overhead costs down and focus on the projects at hand. Larger studios have their perks too, of course. With larger clients, they often have a wide variety of tools at their disposal such as creatives and all the latest technology.

4. Did you look at previous public service announcements produced by the studio?

Always look at the previous work created by the production studio. Do you align with the creative vision and concepts aligning out of the studio? Do the PSAs really target their audiences? Do you resonate with the PSAs?

Chances are, your PSA will look something similar, so make sure you like what you see.

5. Is the PSA production studio able to get your public service announcement finished within your time frame?

Some studios have an extremely fast turnaround time, while others may take months before the PSA reaches the public. Check to ensure that the studio's timeline matches yours.

Follow these general guidelines, and your search for the right PSA production studio for your piece should be much easier.

7 Tips To Get More From Soul Bands For Your Event

William Shakespeare put it best, “If music be the food of love, play on.” There's no substitute for setting the mood for your reception or getting the guests up onto the dance floor than a live music from a great soul band. You can book them for special occasions such as weddings, private parties, and…

William Shakespeare put it best, “If music be the food of love, play on.” There's no substitute for setting the mood for your reception or getting the guests up onto the dance floor than a live music from a great soul band. You can book them for special occasions such as weddings, private parties, and corporate events.

Yet hiring the right Funk bands involves a serious investment, and can also be a challenge if you do not know how and where to look. To help you get the best value for your money, here are seven smart tips to get more from hiring soul bands:

1. Cherry-pick your soul band

Keep in mind that there are different styles of soul music, and their price usually varies based on their popularity and the number of musicians in the group. Know which soul band best suits your style and budget.

2. Listen to audio and watch video

Learn about your best options out there. Listen to each band's audio samples and song lists online. Some Salsa bands offer video clips of their past performances. Pay attention to how they interact with the audience. If possible, try to watch them perform live. It is also best to consider your venue and acoustics when checking out the band.

3. Read client feedback

Check the soul band's website. A good band usually has an official website where you can find more information about them as well as feedback from clients from their past gigs. It would be wise to get in touch with one of their clients and ask if they were happy with the band's performance.

4. Book early

Great Salsa bands are more in demand and most difficult to book. So if you find the right one, book them as soon as possible, which is ideally 3 to 6 months in advance.

5. Get a contract

Put your agreement on paper prior to the big day. You may also be required especially by the most professional soul bands to pay a deposit to secure their services.

6. Ask about the Funk band's song list

This is a crucial step to ensure that the band has included in their song list particular songs or a special tune you want played. If they're not included, ask them at the first meeting if they would be willing to learn one or two of the songs or maybe even more.

Allow them some weeks or months to prepare. Sometimes, the Funk bands will charge the client for an additional fee for the new arrangement. Do not also forget to find out in advance when the band will accommodate song requests from the audience.

7. Follow up

Always keep in touch with the band as often as it is needed. Professional soul bands appreciate it when their clients are vocal about the exact type of entertainment they want. Also, inform them clearly about the demographics of your visitors and the flow of the program.