A Comparison of BlitzWolf BW-F2 And BlitzWolf BW-F3

I think it is very nice when you go traveling with music. During your journey, a portable speaker will be your good fellow. In this article, I will show you two excellent outdoor use Bluetooth speakers: BlitzWolf BW-F2 and BlitzWolf BW-F3. And I will do a comparison between them. The article involves two main parts,…

I think it is very nice when you go traveling with music. During your journey, a portable speaker will be your good fellow. In this article, I will show you two excellent outdoor use Bluetooth speakers: BlitzWolf BW-F2 and BlitzWolf BW-F3. And I will do a comparison between them. The article involves two main parts, including the same designs and different aspects.

Same Designs

They both have the same designs of Bluetooth 4.0 connectivity, hands-free calling and 2,000mAh battery configuration.

Both of them support two connection ways. One is the Bluetooth wireless connection. This method needs to make a pairing of the speaker and your devices. And the pairing only needs three simple steps. Another is the wired connection via a 3.5mm audio cable. This method is suitable for the devices which do not support Bluetooth function.

Built-in a waterproof mic, the speaker is excellent in noise reduction. Beside, it will deliver crystal-clear communications. When the call comes, you just need to press the answer button and you can communicate with your friends. Very conveniently!

In terms of the battery configuration, the speaker is powered by a 2,000mAh battery which supports up to 8 hours playing time. By the way, it needs about 4 hours charging time.

Different Aspects

According to the different aspects, they show the differences in drive unit configuration, waterproof level and the body size.

BlitzWolf BW-F3 is configured with a 50mm diameter 5W output drive unit, while BlitzWolf BW-F3 has a design of two pieces of 40mm diameter 5W output ones. It is clear that F3 product brings you more shocking playback.

BlitzWolf BW-F2 has an IP65 water-resistant level, while F3 has an IPX5 waterproof standard. Compared with F2, F3 speaker has a higher grade waterproof capability.

In the aspect of body size, F2 has a size of 98 * 90 * 50 mm, while F3 has a dimension of 173 * 73 * 49 mm.

Summary

Generally speaking, these two outdoor use Bluetooth speakers have the same designs as well as different aspects. If you do not know which one to choose, then I can give you some advice. In terms of body size, BlitzWolf BW-F2 is smaller. While considering the drive unit configuration, BlitzWolf BW-F3 brings more shocking playback.

If you are those who like doing outdoor activities with music, you can take them into consideration. Choosing which one depends on your actual needs.

Are Rappers Better Off Dead?

” Biggie Smalls fell off! He was never that nice anyway! I mean Life After Death to me was better than Ready To Die and even that could've been one CD instead of two .” As I sit here and conjure up all sorts of imaginary vitriol one might have found on modern day social…

Biggie Smalls fell off! He was never that nice anyway! I mean Life After Death to me was better than Ready To Die and even that could've been one CD instead of two .” As I sit here and conjure up all sorts of imaginary vitriol one might have found on modern day social media had Biggie still been alive, I can not help but wonder if there is any rapper whose legacy has not been tained by simply remaining alive?

Every other genre, sport and special interest seems to have untouchable heroes and legends that represent their brand. So why not hip hop?

Hip hop is an unforgiving genre. It's rooted in urban culture and, if there's one thing that has always been lacking in urban culture, it is long term praise for our heroes. Whether a learned or innate attribute, a Mount Rushmore of hip hop could probably never be constructed by virtue of dissension in our ranks. No one would ever concede long enough to form any sort of general consensus (are not there three hip hop museums in NY alone ?!) The hood may sing your praises but you better believe someone has a problem with every single component of your ascension (“Why do you work so hard?!? Why your girlfriend so pretty? You is not special!”) Be that as it may, every other genre, sport and special interest seems to have untouchable heroes and legends that represent their brand. So why not hip hop?

At no point in time was hip hop ever expected nor intended to come as far as it has. Competition has also always been a purveying component of rap. But is it possible that every single emcee has fallen off or was never really that good? Every single one? Slick Rick fell off? Rakim fell off? Nas fell off? There is not one rapper who sustained any sort of complementary track record through their own career? DO we really believe there is not no Tony Bennet of this rap ish? Now that to me just looks ridiculous. Of course no one is above reproach and no one is infallible but come the hell now? Everyone sucks except for the dead guys?

For every “Top 5 debate” ever had, there's so much acrimony presented as to why everyone we love should not be that heralded that I'm not certain if these debts should be called a “Top 5” or “Top 5 things wrong with your fave emcee (“Jay-Z is a biter, Nas can not pick good beats, Andre 3000 do not record enough, etc.”). rest, BIG is not have a large enough body of work “) The” battle “has over taken the” rap “in every instance and contention is the ONLY order of the day these days.

Could it be that all our favorite emcees did not become terrible and our irrational formula of [nostalgia + consistent innovation / newness * personal expectation = all emcees will ever suck] is what may be the driver? I've said it before but you can only lose your virginity once and with each additional occurrence, no matter how pleasant, the newness will ever wear off and you start to look for other benefits to satiate your needs. In other words, a dope emcee is a dope emcee.

If the only artists you can truly appreciate are the dead ones then it may not be the artists who've changed for the worse (hint; it's you you cranky curmudgeon.)

Why Overcoming Your Music Career Competition Is Simple, Here’s How It’s Done

Complete this 5-second music career test: True or false: To attain all the music career opportunities you want, you must overcome tons of competition. True or false: To truly become successful in the music business, you must beat out thousands of competitors. Both of these statements are completely false! The music business really is not…

Complete this 5-second music career test:

True or false: To attain all the music career opportunities you want, you must overcome tons of competition.

True or false: To truly become successful in the music business, you must beat out thousands of competitors.

Both of these statements are completely false!

The music business really is not filled with tons of competition. Music companies are in dire need of new musicians to offer great contracts to, but have a hard time finding such musicians. You read that right.

Extremely successful pro musicians do not think about competing with others. They invest their time into becoming the kind of musician that other music industry types are looking for. This helps them get the music business opportunities that others do not get / do not know exist.

What makes someone the right kind of musician who gets the best opportunities? Specifically, what must you do to become this kind of musician?

Why Fearing Music Business Competition Hurts Your Music Career

Here's how it is: The majority of musicians put an end to their music careers way before they even see a small amount of success. They are under the impression that they are up against massive levels of competition. As a result, they quit too soon because they are intimidated by the overwhelming (and imaginary) competition they believe they are facing.

Competition? Where Is The Competition?

Beating competition in the music business is actually very easy to do. You simply have to remove all fear from your mindset. This becomes much easier once you know who your competitors really are.

Most musicians have bad attitudes, mindsets and habits that make success altogether impossible for them. These things include:

1. Being Afraid To Fail. A lot of musicians are afraid of what will happen if they try to get into the music business and it does not work out. They fear they will not earn enough money through music alone. They fear that they might look like a failure, be too old, not have enough talent, not get enough opportunities in their local area and other things.

They focus all their time and energy on not failing rather than succeeding. They become paralyzed in their music careers or form backup plans that take them further away from music.

2. Being Afraid Of Success (Yes, That's Right). The kinds of musicians who fear success, ruin things for themselves just as they reach the brink of a big. They worry about these things:

– Negative thoughts others will have of them when they become successful.

– If they are even worthy of big success.

– If they will be able to sustain success after they reach it.

This fear keeps many musicians with tons of potential from ever achieving their goals.

3. Small Amounts of Passion And Desire. Most musicians think they want to be successful, but really do not want it bad enough to take major action. Most are not working actively to build success. They sit back waiting for success to just happen for them. Others become reckless in their approach. They accept the life of a starving artists, expecting success to come from struggle.

People in the music industry can tell whether your desire for success is real. They are very good at observing both your intentions and the actions you take. Note: wanting success really bad does not necessarily mean struggling for years before you make it in this industry.

4. Procrastination. Many musicians talk a lot about how they do not know what they need to do to become successful. Truth is, it's not too hard to figure this out. Making yourself actually DO the right things is a lot harder.

Here is an example: almost any musician would agree that a music career mentor would help their doctors grow at a faster rate. However, only a small amount of musicians seek mentoring of any kind. Everyone else says: “I can not afford to pay for it” or “I do not have time for it” or “I'm just not prepared for mentoring right now” or “I'll try it later.”

These are all rationalizations to make it easier to procrastinate. When it comes down to it, we all make time / have money for important things. This in mind, it's a lot easier to make excuses than take action.

5. Lacking Commitment. If you want to achieve big goals, it'll take perseverance and dedication. A lot of musicians stop pursuing their goals when faced with struggle and difficulty, causing their dedication to fade over time.

99.9% of musicians have or do at least some of these things. These qualities immediately disqualify them from becoming successful in the music industry.

The Main Key To Tons Of Music Career Success

Want to become one of the top musicians in the world? Overcome the fundamental issues that destroy your music career success. This quickly puts you above your perceived competition. Yes, that's all you need to do!

How to end self-sabotage in your music career and prepare yourself for success in the music business:

1. Start choosing the things that matter most. You need to choose to take action on things that move your career ahead. Find out what you need to do to become successful. Then dedicate yourself to taking frequent action on what you learn.

Understand the difference between an expense and an investment. An expenditure removes money from your pocket and costs time / resources. This money never comes back. Paying rent, buying food or paying your phone bill are examples of expenses. Spending time on Facebook, playing games or watching TV are also examples of expenses.

An investment is something you invest your money (or time) into in order to get long-term value on the back end. Investing time to learn how the music business works, getting music career coaching, and joining a music industry mastermind group are all examples of making investments into your music career.

You must try to eliminate expenses and increase the amount of investments you make.

2. Replace any time you say “I should” with “I will”. For example: “I should invest more into my music career” becomes “I will invest more into my music career”. “I should stop procrastinating on reaching my goals” becomes “I will stop procrastinating on reaching my goals”. Saying “should” gives you way out of taking action. This mindset lacks the urgency needed to take action and succeed.

3. Pro musicians who become successful have more urgency than most people. They say “I WILL INVEST more time and energy into my music career”, “I WILL STOP PROCrastinating” and “I WILL Learn more about the music industry.” This kind of mindset refuses to accept failure. It gives you unstoppable motivation to do whatever it takes to achieve your musical goals.

These basic changes in attitude make it easy to beat your competitors and become a successful professional musician.

8 Necessary Steps to Developing a Successful Music Career

No matter how successful you were in your music career last year, this year could be better. Then again, if you are unwilling to change with the tide, it could end your career completely. Here are 8 steps to make sure your music career develops into the most successful business venture it can be. Write…

No matter how successful you were in your music career last year, this year could be better. Then again, if you are unwilling to change with the tide, it could end your career completely. Here are 8 steps to make sure your music career develops into the most successful business venture it can be.

Write Down Your Goals

At the beginning of each year, you should write down realistic, attainable goals for the next twelve months. Break your long term goals down into short-term goals so that you can monitor your progress, and reward yourself every now and then.

Keep that list of goals in front of you every single day. What you do then is work out a plan of how you will achieve each of goal. By having an actionable plan that you can look at every day, will reinforce the need to complete a certain number of things per day. You may also come up with additional ideas as you go along. By the end of the year, you will be amazed at just how much you did accomplish from your list.

Learn How to Make a Strong Marketing Plan for Your Music

Your music is a product, so you better have a strong marketing plan to get the word out about it. This is especially true if you're an unsigned artist, and still need to do a lot of your music promotion yourself. It's a lot more than recording a great sounding album, commissioning artwork for it and spending tons of time on the packaging. These days, only the most die-hard fans even buy CD's. You should be spending your marketing money on promoting the music itself. In the long run, your money does a lot more work for you that way.

Start Gigging

Playing shows is one of the best ways to promote your music. Not only is live music everywhere, but once you've established enough, you get paid to play, rather than the other way around. It also offers a great venue to sell CD's and other merchandise. You can not really beat live shows, no matter how big or small they are, because they offer some of the best word of mouth you can get. They are also a great way to get contacts within the industry, as people scouting for talent scour even the most out-of-the-way places to find the next big thing.

Make Your Own Music Website

Having your own website is extremely affordable. After purchasing a domain name, hosting can even be free outside, of paying for the domain every year. Make sure that you have strong knowledge of online marketing or hire someone who does. Your website becomes the hub of all your music marketing efforts and from there, visitors can branch out and see everything that you do. It can be one of your greatest assets and can make even unsigned musicians a lot of money through the exposure.

Get Your Music Promoted on Blogs

Bloggers are happy to promote good musicians and they are one of the easiest ways to get song promotion. They often only require a bit of your time for an interview, as people want to know the artist behind the music. By taking the time to interview, the blogger can gain a better respect for who you are and provide valuable information to people who are looking for new artists in your genre. Bloggers get paid by their own advertisers and by referring their visitors to your music. The social media coverage that bloggers offer is also fairly substantive and can get you a lot of new followers.

Understand That Your Music is a Business

Like any industry, music is a business. This means you have to make money to get anywhere. Whenever you make a profit from your music, it's smart to reinvest that money. You can put some into marketing and advertising, some into improved equipment, and some into getting to play better venues.

Streaming is Where the Money Is Now

With album sales going by the wayside, streaming music is the area to focus on. While it does not look as glamorous as record sales, the long-term profit margins are actually significantly higher. People who like your music and listen to it all the time will actually make you a lot more money than they would have by simply buying an album or their favorite tracks. It also means that the tracks that are not as widely marked are just as accessible as the hits, meaning that people will be a lot more likely to check out your whole catalog, meaning you can make a lot more money.

Learn How to Adapt and Grow with The Industry

Every industry is always growing and evolving, and keeping up with those changes is extremely necessary to stay successful. This does not mean buying into every new trend that comes along. But if you can find a way to take advantage of new technology or other new advances, while staying within your budget, and making a profit.

Find out more about breaking into the music industry by visiting www.superstartunes.com/blogs/

The Laws of Music Industry Success for Independent Hip Hop Artists

Success in the multi-billion-dollar hip hop music industry does not work like in the movies. Oftentimes, independent artists post their music online hoping for overnight success. While this can happen, it takes many years of hard work, plenty of organization, planning, and some luck. You do not even need a major label to achieve success…

Success in the multi-billion-dollar hip hop music industry does not work like in the movies. Oftentimes, independent artists post their music online hoping for overnight success. While this can happen, it takes many years of hard work, plenty of organization, planning, and some luck. You do not even need a major label to achieve success today. But for independent hip hop artists to achieve success in the industry, here are some laws to observe.

Research What It Takes to Win

While formulating your plan for success, make sure that you have all sorts of trackable things that you can market. Major record labels are not in the business of promoting musicians that do not have these copies of solid numbers. These include online download numbers, independent record or song sales, online presence on popular industry websites and blogs, YouTube views, tours, etc.

Any endorsement from established artists is especially important. All these things not only work for you if you want to get signed, but these numbers work well for you as an independent artist, too.

Using Your Resources Strategically

One of the most important things to keep in mind while you're seeking success in music is to make sure you have another source of income to stay fed, have a roof over your head, and keep your bills paid. Having no money at all leads to stress that can interfere with your creativity. Not every artist has a benefitor to cover most or all of their expenses.

You need to learn to manage your resources, no matter how limited they may seem to you right now. In fact, the less you have to work with, the better you will learn to manage and make the best of what you have. It will teach you how to strategize how to turn each small bit into something bigger, a skill that will only work for you more as you gather more resources later on.

Keep Your Creative Drive and Vision

Your individual creativity is the ability that can set you apart as an aspiring unsigned hip hop artist. Find what sets you apart from everyone else and focus on that. There will be many moments where things will look to stall, so you need to keep that drive to prevent doubt from letting you become lazy and / or ever give up.

Clearly defining your vision as an artist is how to keep that drive going. Overnight success is a myth. Be realistic and understand that trial and error is just a part of the game. By consistently finding what works best for you, you'll always find yourself develop into the artist you were always meant to become.

Make the Best Music You Can

Remember that industry success always begins with the music. You have to connect with your audience, or you are not going to find any success in the music industry. Obviously, song promotion becomes a lot easier when the music is actually good. It's actually most important to study how strangers react to your music. Your friends and family will often say whatever they think will help, not necessarily what actually will. It's not easy, or everyone would be doing it. Attaining success can be such a thankless job, but ever, you could be one of the lucky few that make it to the top of the hip hop music ladder.

Become a Master of Multitasking

Independent or not, at the end of the day, your success lies with you. Learning how to become a multitasking master or a great delegator of responsibilities is a major component of gaining success. Whether you look to sign or not, be persistent in your networking and find people that understand your brand as an artist. By having people on your team that are all on the same page, you can get a lot done, even with only having a useful of people. Promoting a music artist is hard work, but having your own team do it can make sure your vision and your product's message stays consistent.

Value Independence

While there are the rare few who find quick success by signing with a major label, remaining an unsigned artist and being independent is quite valuable. Nothing against labels, but when you sign with a label, you become immediately subject to their rules and whims. Staying independent as long as you can actually work in your favor. The more established you and your brand are, the more you will have control over long-term.

Develop Your Identity and Your Team

There is no one perfect recipe for success for independent recording artists. But one thing that always works is developing your identity as an artist and building your brand. Bringing together a professional team to build and develop your brand can ever create music that can sell itself.

Work Hard and Be Humble and Realistic

Every success comes with a little bit of luck, and it's no different for unsigned musicians. Have a strong head on your shoulders and be humble and realistic. Do not give into trends or just mimic everyone else. Most of all, do not get an inflated ego. Work harder with your actions, not just with your words. And, of course, do not be a spammer when pushing your brand and music.

Balance Online Presence with Physical Presence

Having an online presence, both on websites and social media, is important. But nothing beats good old-fashioned networking and performances. Balancing the two successfully is how you create a loyal fan base. You can not just spam the Internet with links and hope people come see and listen to you.

Know the Business

Just because you wrote, performed, and produced a song does not mean that anyone owes you anything at all. You need to know how to sell tickets or some other product. Otherwise what venue or sponsors will want to have you? Music promotion as an independent artist can actually be done on a limited budget. But you still need to learn how to invest that money properly to build your music business. If you're not investing in your business, then your music is just a hobby.

If you're looking for a major record deal, it will take an investment of tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of dollars into your business. You need that kind of investment to bring in the returns that labels are looking for when signing artists. Therefore, investing in your own indie music business is smarter since you can still make a significant income with less money invested. This way you get to collect everything you invested.

Be Visible and Consistent

The most important thing when selling any product, especially music, is to stay visible. Even if you have to play some free shows to get publicity, you should. Even if it's only in front of family and friends, consistently performing is the only way you'll master your craft. Once you have your songs down, get them recorded. Should you make them into videos and upload them to YouTube?

Yes, and not just because some sensations have come out of it. Yes, this means you're essentially giving your music away, but it's worth it. You have to have something to link to that's easily available, especially when it comes to sharing your product on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc. You have to keep up with the competition and get your word out there. Once people get into your music, they'll help spread the word for you.

While the daily grind of the music industry is quite challenging, learning how to deal with the ups and downs will shape your future success as an independent hip hop artist.

Find out more about breaking into the music industry by visiting www.superstartunes.com/blogs/

How to Climb the Ladder of Success in the Music Industry

The music industry is extremely complex. Just like in any industry, having innovative ideas and thinking outside of the box are important to having a successful career. On its own, talent is rarely enough to make an unsigned artist into a superstar. As an unsigned artist, having talent is good, but it takes a strong…

The music industry is extremely complex. Just like in any industry, having innovative ideas and thinking outside of the box are important to having a successful career. On its own, talent is rarely enough to make an unsigned artist into a superstar. As an unsigned artist, having talent is good, but it takes a strong work ethic and character to make it to the next level. Many popular artists today spend many years working very hard, taking the right opportunities, and meeting the right people to get to where they are today.

Just Be Yourself

It may sound corny, but staying true to yourself is the first thing unsigned musicians have to do before you do anything else. You can be proud of yourself, but be humble by what it took to get to where you are. The last thing you want to become is come off as arrogant. It's also very rewarding to work as an independent artist, since you do not have a bunch of other people telling you what to do. Being your own boss is not for everyone, though. If you do work in a company, do not let them try to change who you are. Being different may seem to make it harder, but in the long run, knowing you did things your way is its own reward.

Do not Forget Where You Came From

As you move up in the music industry, it can be easy to forget where you came from. It's important to keep your friends from outside music, too. Be respectful to those end end up looking up to you and seeking your advice and guidance. Helping with promoting musicians still at the bottom work their way up is the best thing you can do. Always make time for those important to you and those that deserve your attention. Not only will this make your own music promotion easier, but it will grow your network in ways that you can only now imagine.

Surround Yourself with Positive People

The best thing to have around you in any endeavor is to have people that support and encourage you on a regular basis. Surround yourself with positive individuals with similar interests to your own. There will always be those trying to tear you down, sometimes out of envy or jealousy. Be optimistic, as in the end, the good times will overcome the bad times. Nothing worth fighting for comes easily, and the struggles are worthwhile. Keeping the hope alive from one day to the next will make success that much sweeter. Having your own support network makes that success much easier to come by in the long run.

Never Burn Bridges On Purpose

Not everyone is going to be on your side. That's just a fact of life. But do your best to keep lines open with everyone you can. Sometimes you have to apologize for situations that were not even your fault. If your apology is not accepted, recognize that it's not your problem and just move on. Kindness and honesty are golden. If you have those two things, you'll find the right people to work with, people that are actually passionate and serious about promoting music artists.

Professionalism Is Everything

Like in any other industry, networking is a major key to success. That means professionalism is everything. Taking a mature, professional attitude is the way to gaining respect. While it's always fine to be casual, be sure to develop close relationships first. It does not matter how young or old you are. It's still the same when it comes to networking. It's more than just song promotion. Networking is about people.

Help Others. It's Not All About the Money

Money is not everything. Especially in music, the best way to make it is to help others succeed with their own craft. Almost no one makes a lot of money right away. Follow your passion and the money will come. If you put others before yourself and solve their problems, you'll be a happier and satisfied person. Just make sure you're happy and satisfied yourself, and you'll be able to help people more effectively.

Be open to everything music. You may be surprised how genres of music you never before considered can inspire you. Consider the ideas and constructive feedback that people give you carefully. Embrace the diversity of the music industry is critical. Do not do favors for people just to expect something back. Do it because you care and actually want to see that person succeed. Being selfless and not selfish will help you in the long run by making connections you otherwise would never have had.

Sacrifice, Ambition, and Dedication

While it is “all about the music,” having lots of talent and making awesome music is not going to promise you success. It takes a lot of ambition and dedication, and you will have to make many sacrifices along the way.

Having lofty, seemingly unrealistic goals is actually a good thing, as long as you do not get carried away. Setting goals is about always having something to reach for, not necessarily for something you have to achieve. It helps you keep your expectations high. It's actually a good thing for people to question and doubt your goals. This provides motivation. It's good to have lofty visions, because even if you fall short of those, you're still going to achieve something meaningful.

You also have to know your level of dedication to music. Is it a true passion for you or just a hobby? If you can live without it, you will not have the drive you need to truly succeed in a music career. While music starts out as a hobby for many people, you have to find a true passion for it before you can expect to take it anywhere.

The reason you need so much dedication is because there are many sacrifices that you'll have to make. Music has to be your number one priority in life, and nothing else can get in the way. It's like creating a start-up business. Not only is there a lot to do that needs your constant attention, but you need to network to find people that you can delegate some of those responsibilities to so that you can focus mostly on the creative, performance, and production aspects of music.

You have to sacrifice parts of your social and recreational life to make it all work. You're not entitled to breaks until you've made it work. In fact, your shows can eventually become your breaks, as packed homes who can not wait for you to play the best motivation there is.

If you follow these points, chasing success in the music industry will become much more than a dream. Somewhere along the way, you'll find some sort of success you can be happy with.

Find out more about breaking into the music industry by visiting www.superstartunes.com/blogs/

The Music Industry’s Formula for Success – Does It Exist?

Artists often want to know if there is an exact formula that they can follow to guarantee success in the music industry. Does a formula like this exist? What can artists do to help ensure a successful outlet? Is it possible to follow an exact business plan or to become a successful artist or is…

Artists often want to know if there is an exact formula that they can follow to guarantee success in the music industry. Does a formula like this exist? What can artists do to help ensure a successful outlet? Is it possible to follow an exact business plan or to become a successful artist or is the income in the industry determined by pure luck?

Timing is Important

When it comes to getting it right in the music industry, timing is everything. It does not matter what other talents an artist has on their side, or what strategies they have put in place, timing is the main factor. Watch the market to see when an exact type of talent or unsigned artist is needed. This way, you'll know when your perfect time might be.

Supply and Demand

Just like with any other product, the music industry has supply and demand chain. Some genres have more demand than others. Also, local demand and national demand for unsigned musicians are very different. Just because you have a breakthrough in your local area, does not mean you are going to have a national breakthrough. There are artists that thrive locally, but do not generate enough publicity to get international or even national attention.

Talent Is not Black & White

Talent is a lot more than an artist's voice or instrumental skills. It includes skills such as dancing, presence, songwriting, and musical composition. It also has a lot to do with how you present yourself to the public. Above all of this, the most important talent to have as an artist is the ability to connect with your public.

You must be able to connect with an audience and make them feel the message you are trying to convey. After all, music is about sharing a story and generating emotions. When record labels are evaluating talent and promoting musicians, they look at an artist as a package. If an artist has strong skills in one area, it can make up for missing others.

Using Your Image to Maximize Success

Your image should be yours alone. While familiarity can help your cause, there should also be something completely unique about your personal style and image. Fans do not want to see the exact same thing over and over and they definitely do not want to see an artist who is exactly like another.

Show Your Stuff

Experience as an artist can mean a lot of things when it comes to song promotion. It includes how many shows you've done and how well you prepare at rehearsals. But most importantly, it's about how you deal with failure and over it. It's how you access rejection or make positive things out of negative feedback. Experience is a good thing, and so is professionalism. When you're an unsigned artist, the more experience and professionalism you have, the better chance you'll have of being signaled by a major label. Use what you know to let people you're serious about your music.

Everything Comes at A Price

Real life is not like the movies. Most likely, you are not going to be magically successful overnight just because you have amazing talent. Plenty of people with amazing talent never see the light of day when it comes to the music industry. It takes effort, time, and many times, even money to get where you want. The music industry does not offer a free rise to success. Work with other artists, stay in the studio, network within the industry, play gigs, and more.

These things often take more money and time than some realize. Even the best of artists can fall flat on their face quickly without careful planning.

Learn from the Best

Learning from the best is both a blessing and a curse. Those who have had success can see things that you never would on your own. But it's also possible for a mentor to focus too much on things that do not work for you, too. Mentors and advisors are important. Just be sure that you choose the right ones and make sure to evaluate each piece of advice you are given to see if it will work for you.

Know What They Want and Use Your Bests & Worsts to Provide It

Connecting with your fan base is perhaps the best way to grow as an artist. Not only is it an important part of song promotion, but you get to know what your fans really want. Artists and fans can now communicate freely in ways that artists from past generations could only dream about. You can not just give in to every demand that comes along, but take the good ideas as they come. While there are always going to be fan events set up by agents and promoters, social media is an artist's direct lifeline to fans and can not be underestimated. Know your personal bests and worsts and use those to decide what you can and can not give to your fan base. Anything else that's workable can be delegated to a team.

Getting Play

Music promotion can be a tricky thing. Sometimes the road to record sales and radio play can be longer and rockier than an artist originally thought it would be. It can also be a vicious circle, as it can take radio play to get record sales and vice versa. It also may take a lot of shows being booked and played to get either. Getting all three helps ensure success. However, it can be difficult to get play in any of those arenas without showing experience and a fan base from at least one. Yet and still, even artists that do get to that point still may not sell enough records to keep it going. This is why it's important to constantly be doing things to ensure success in all areas.

Adapting to Change

Be patient. Even if you do everything right, success is not always an instant guarantee. You have to learn to be flexible. Sometimes that means just relaxing and not overdoing it. But more than anything, it means you need to get used to things not going as planned. Changes that occur in the industry, accepting gigs you might not usually do, breaking your fixed routines, and things that throw you off schedule are the only thing in the music industry. The artists that go above, and beyond and have the ability to go with the flow, will usually rise up quicker than those who can not.

Learn the Industry Inside and Out

This is the only way you'll ever succeed in the music industry. You must know every nook and cranny of the music scene, and exactly how each moving part works to make a whole when promoting musicians. This means you need to study exactly what to do in the studio, learn about royalties and other revenue, publishing deals, bookings, and so much more. Music may be the main focus, but it's far from the only thing you need to know. You must also be a master at research and business. This knowledge will not only help you advance quickly, but it can help prevent people from taking advantage of you and causing you to start over from scratch.

Find out more about breaking into the music industry by visiting www.superstartunes.com/blogs/

Hip Hop Beats For Sale – Why It Is Important To Buy Hip Hop Beats

Everybody knows all the big names in music, from Drake to Snoop Dogg, and everyone else in between. We also know that they are making millions of dollars (or at least assume that they are making millions of dollars) off of their music. But does anyone really stop to learn the names of their producers,…

Everybody knows all the big names in music, from Drake to Snoop Dogg, and everyone else in between. We also know that they are making millions of dollars (or at least assume that they are making millions of dollars) off of their music. But does anyone really stop to learn the names of their producers, the people in the back room coming up with all of our favorite beats to our favorite songs?

For a second, let's just think about what exactly makes us want to even listen to a song. Just imagine you put on a CD and you hear some really annoying high pitch bells and a lame bass line. Your finger can not help itself, it hits skip on the stereo before you can even process what has happened. Next song comes on, now you hear a really nice piano melody, next some chimes, and finally the beat starts to come together as the bass kicks in and now you're listening to the hook of the song. Why did not you skip it? I'll tell you. Because the beat kept you listening. You see, the first thing we hear (usually) is the beat and right away we decide if we want to give the song a chance or not. This is one of the MANY reasons why it is so important for a music artist to invest in some quality hip hop beats. I'm not saying the lyrics are not important, what I am saying is that the beat or the producer for that matter should not be taken for granted.

Ok we get it, hip hop beats are important, but why should artists pay for them when they could find free beats almost everywhere online? Well to start it off, hip hop beats are not very expensive. You could find hip hop beats for sale at very reasonable prices. Actually most producers online set their prices so that your average underground artist could afford them. On average you'll only be paying around $ 20 – $ 30 for a basic lease and maybe anywhere from $ 100 – $ 500 for exclusive rights. If you look at these big artists, they are making thousands if not millions of dollars off their music, when the producer is making pennies. So if you're going to be making more than $ 20 it's only right that you at least pay the producer for his hard work right? Well most people do not think that way, they still continue to blow up producers inboxes with messages like “hook it up with some free beats”, or “let's collab” which is just a nicer way to say I do not want to pay you for your hip hop beats. Another thing a lot of unsigned artists like to do is take beats from YouTube or other social media platforms without the producers consent. This is not only hard on the producer but it could also be hard on you if you make a lot of money with the song. Let's just say you took a beat from YouTube and decided to record on it. Now your song is getting a lot more plays than you thought it would, and record labels are hitting you up left and right. You got signed and your label wanted to promote your song. Now you're in the money right? Well you would have been if you owned the rights to the beat that you recorded on, but you did not pay for it, meaning that your song and all the money you have made off of it actually belong to the producer who's beat you took in the first place. Now all he has to do is prove that he made the beat, and show that you do not have any type of legal rights to use it.

Have you ever heard Lil John's hit song “Turn Down For What”? I'm sure you have being that the song became the seventh best-selling song of 2014 in the US with 3,449,000 copies sold for the year. Well if you have heard the song then you should know that there is not a whole lot of lyrics on it. It's basically a really catchy beat with the phrase “turn down for what” sprinkled through it. This is the perfect example of how powerful a beat could be. “I only listen to the song because of the beat” how many times have you heard your friends say this? How many times have you said it? Beats are extremely important to hip hop music, well to music in general!

Well hopefully I've helped shed some light on buying beats or at least given you a different perspective on why the music producer and beats are important. Much love, and keep making music!

Lukas Graham

One of the hottest bands to emerge in a while is the Danish pop-soul band named Lukas Graham. The band is named after the lead singer, Lukas Graham Forchhammer. Along with the lead singer, other members of the band are the drummer Mark Falgren, bassist Magnus Larsson, and keyboardist Kasper Daugaard. Their first record, Lukas…

One of the hottest bands to emerge in a while is the Danish pop-soul band named Lukas Graham. The band is named after the lead singer, Lukas Graham Forchhammer. Along with the lead singer, other members of the band are the drummer Mark Falgren, bassist Magnus Larsson, and keyboardist Kasper Daugaard. Their first record, Lukas Graham and Then We Take the World, were released in 2012. In April 2016, the self-titled global debut album was officially released in the United States by Warner Bros. Records. Their album was first released by Copenhagen Records.

Lukas Graham grow up in a neighborhood in Denmark called Christiania, a town of about 800 people. It is known as a 'freetown' because it has separate laws and a justice system independent of the rest of the country. He did not grow up poor, but did not really have enough. Luxuries in the vicinity in the early nineties included running water and flushing toilets. He joined the Copenhagen Boys' Choir at eight years old. He toured through the states and Europe with them. Later, after spending six months in Buenos Aires and time in New York, he bought his style of music home to Christiania in 2010. His music can be described as folk music and classical mixed with soul, rock 'n' roll, and rap.

The band was first discovered when they uploaded some videos on Facebook in 2011. They uploaded videos of the songs “Drunk in the Morning” and “Criminal Mind.” These videos were watched over hundreds of thousands of times. In late 2011, Copenhagen Records picked them up. Their first release became certified platinum Five times in Denmark. They were first only released in Europe and select countries. The band put on 107 concerts in Europe in 2012 and sold 40,000 tickets in Denmark alone. During their first year, they sold 80,000 albums and 150,000 singles and also earned 5 million YouTube views and 27 million streams.

The band was signed to Warner Bros. Records in 2013 because they wanted to bring their music to the United States. In 2015, they released their “Blue Album.” It became number one on the Danish charts and also made it onto several other European country charts. On December 10, 2015, they made their United States television debut playing their song “7 Years” on Conan. Since then, they have also performed on Jimmy Kimmel Live !, Late Night with Seth Meyers and The Ellen DeGeneres Show.

Royalty Benefits

Royalties, what does that actually mean in the music industry? Artists write and perform songs all the time, but have you ever wonder how they actually get paid for the music they make? Think back to the time you heard a MC Hammer song on a commercial or a song on Pandora by the artist…

Royalties, what does that actually mean in the music industry? Artists write and perform songs all the time, but have you ever wonder how they actually get paid for the music they make? Think back to the time you heard a MC Hammer song on a commercial or a song on Pandora by the artist known as Future. Singers and song writers have rights to their own music-after all, they did create it. The creation and streaming of their music is how they acquire a pay check. In other words, this payment of funds is called Royalties.

Royalties are a percentage of gross or net profit or a fixed amount per sale to which a creator of a work is entitled, which is agreed upon in a contract between the creator and the publisher, agent, and / or distributor. These terms and agreements must be signed off on a legal document such as a contract. The contract that states the payment of asserted royalties shall be generated semi-annually on the first day of two selected months that all parties have agreed upon. For example, the first annual payment maybe on December 1st and the second on June 1st. According to the Copyright Royalty Board, the 2016 rates for commercial subscription services is $ 0.0022 per-performance, and for commercial non subscription services is $ 0.0017 per-performance. There are several types of royalties such as, performance royalties are for performances in front of an audience, and mechanical royalties are paid by the record label to the publisher for the phono records, digital audio tapes, and other manufactured formats. These are copyright registrations that entitle a musical composer to performance royalties whenever the musician's composition is performed publicly, over radio, or in restaurants, bars, or other public places.

Now that you know how artists receive royalties, the question is where exactly does the money actually come from? How is the money generated? A distributor collects royalties directly from stores / streaming on behalf of the label. These distributors are part of a performing rights organizations by the names of Broadcast Music Inc. (BMI), American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP), and Society of European Stage Authors and Composers (SESAC). These organizations are responsible for collecting income on the behalf of song writers, performers, and musicians. In an industry like this, members desire accountability for their artistry, and these royalties aid artist receive their cut for the hard work they have put in. This information is provided to encourage you to research payment methods for recorded songs and performances.

How To Yield Good Results From Your Home Recording

Professional studios are trusted for quality productions. However, with the necessary equipment and the right home studio setup, you can easily record from the comfort of your home and still enjoy amazing results. A few tips will help you improve acoustics and recording setup in your home. To get the best results you really need…

Professional studios are trusted for quality productions. However, with the necessary equipment and the right home studio setup, you can easily record from the comfort of your home and still enjoy amazing results. A few tips will help you improve acoustics and recording setup in your home. To get the best results you really need to know what to avoid as far as setting the gear, microphone technique and acoustic environment.

Tip 1 – remember that recording environment will impact the quality of your recording. Start by ensuring that you avoid hard surfaces because they bounce sound round your room. Consider curtains, fabric, furniture, rounded furniture and carpets to eliminate reflective nature of hardwood floors, tiled walls and concrete walls or even countertops.

Tip 2 – Use reflection shields to minimize the sounds picked by microphone sides and back. It is a good idea to use a cardioid microphone that rejects noise from the back and sides.

Tip 3 – Avoid recording right in the middle of the room because this is where frequencies build up and where standing waves are. Instead, get closer to a wall that has hanging blanket and further from opposite wall. Recording inside your clothes closet can be good considering clothes absorb the sounds naturally and there is less echo room inside the closet.

Tip 4 – Go for closed back headphones when home recording. This ensures that the sound does not end up bleeding into the microphone. It is even wiser to get a headphone splitter box if you have more than one person recording.

Tip 5 – Setup the monitors in such a way that you make a point in anilateral triangle. It is best that you stand 45 inches from each of the monitors that you are using so you can have an easy time listening.

Tip 6 – The closer you are to your microphone the louder the audio and the more installed it becomes. For best results, position vocalist six inches from microphone.

Tip 7 – Be selective with microphone pattern. For instance, it would be a good idea to choose a cardioid pattern for single person recording, whereas omnidirectional works great for group recording or chorus recording.

Tip 8 – When using side address microphones, remember that capsules face outward and not upward. This makes it important for you to talk into the microphone side to get the best results.

When thinking about home recording, some of the things you will need include digital audio workstation, computer, mixing speakers or monitors, audio interface, headphones, microphone and a midi keyboard. The first step towards great results is of course, choosing high quality items and then getting it right with the home studio setup. If you are not very sure of how to go about the setup, you can find simple guidelines that you can follow. Using the guidelines you will achieve the best acoustic environment at home and get it right with the recording.

An Obituary – The Death of Modern Western Pop Music

It is with deep regret that I wish to inform you all of the untimely (but blatantly obvious) death of modern Western pop music. Sadly, 'Pop' as it was fondly called was ailing for sometime, and no one seemed to notice when it finally bellied up. 'Pop music' was renamed for bringing us many great…

It is with deep regret that I wish to inform you all of the untimely (but blatantly obvious) death of modern Western pop music.

Sadly, 'Pop' as it was fondly called was ailing for sometime, and no one seemed to notice when it finally bellied up.

'Pop music' was renamed for bringing us many great hits over the decades. Some of these 'hits' date as far back at the 1940s, and over the decades there were many memorable songs from the 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s.

One can even dare say that popular music from each age and from other parts of the globe (Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic) also has the absolute test of time, with the works of numerous composers being studied and performed to this very day .

But something strange happened from the dawn of the new millennium. At first none took any notice, but by the end of the next decade it was painfully clear.

There was no innovation and originality anymore. In fact most artists, regardless of musical category all started to sound the same, as if all these musical groups were being manufactured out of the same warehouse. It did not matter if you were pop, dance, electronica, hip-hop or rock 'n roll (although I doubted the latter two will really make it onto a mainstream radio playlist), all music had the same flow, the same chord progression (I, V, vi, IV), the same breaks, dynamics, and almost all the singers sounded exactly like one another.

It was terribly formulaic. It was too obvious not to notice, yet there were no cries for change.

Everyone seemed to be deaf to what was playing.

This writer believes the death was caused by three culprits, almost like the three legs of a good chair. But like anything else after a while with wear and tear, the legs of this musical chair started to rot, and there was no carpenter to fix the problem, so the legs became wobbly and the chair suddenly collapsed.

The three legs were: Record Labels, Radio and the Artists themselves.

Record labels sprang up around the mid 1920s as a way to record, produce, market and distribute the music that was happening at the time. There were A & amp; R departments (Artist & amp; Repertoire) that looked out new talent and developed a roster of artists / groups that would 'sign' to that label and sell records to the buying public. But alas, the record execs became greedy and lazy over the years and have all but stopped their A & R departments. The bottom line is, you as an artist, you gotta have it all, ready to go for a label to jump in on your bandwagon. And you gotta be sell-able. If you're not cute, sexy, young or be hip with whatever gimmick is the latest trend, then you will not sell. It's that simple and crude. A label is nothing more than a bank now, and they want a great return on their investment. And the artist is the investment. The three main labels that are left now (because the others got swallowed up over the years) could not care any less about real music than a bank cares about helping low-income earners get a loan.

Next up: Radio.

In its' infancy, radio helped build an awareness of a new, hip trendy music that was taking the world by storm. The first radio news broadcast occurred August 31, 1920 and shortly after music performances began to be aired. The new trendy music did not have a name as yet, but all that was about to change.

America was sitting on a goldmine, and along with British kids, musicians took to the blues and jazz, mixed it all up andave it their own twist. Next thing you knew, Rock n Roll was born and the music of the late 1940s and 50s had spunk and VOLUME.

Rock n Roll brought music of the working man right to very doorstep, it wave birth to many sub-genres – Heavy Metal, Indie, Alternative, Grunge, Shoe-Gaze ​​and Pop music all owe their life to Rock n Roll. It's worthy to note that each sub-genre bore their own children, so we can say that Rock n Roll had many children and grandchildren.

To have a look at the children that Rock n Roll will leave behind (courtesy of Wikipedia, just head to Google).

But Jazz and Blues also had another offspring around the same time – R & B, a term sadly coined to differentiate music of African-American origin from Rock n Roll. Absurd and truly racist, but it is a term that 'stuck'.

Thus, Jazz and Blues leave behind two kids – R & B and Rock 'N Roll. Both had their fair share of radio airplay in the early days. Both kids helped to make Pop what it was.

But as the story goes, there came along a thief – Payola.

Thanks to the labels, they made sure that the ONLY content on radio, was their. Soon mainstream radio was nothing more than paid advertising for a label. If you do not believe me, turn on any mainstream Top 40 station and leave it on for a day or two. The station will play a handy of songs at least about five times a day. So there's only a couple songs on radio for airplay? Never mind there are hundreds of thousands of musicians / artists / bands worldwide, only a handful of songs get played on mainstream radio.

Which brings us to Artists: it seems that most artists these days all want to be famous and rich (if that's even possible with the label and entertainment lawyers owning everything. out to make an instant hit. “The term one-hit wonder can not apply to them because the terrible hits keep coming in. They should re-name 'Artists' to 'Factory Clones' because in almost every music genre there's a few that mostly sound / look exactly alike.

And then came along the worst part – the disease to end it all – Autotune (the device that made a terrible single a star)

Together, these three along with their man-made disease helped kill the pop music industry.

Sad that no one saw it coming, maybe something could've been done.

But it is too late, and we have now just the memories of when music used to mean something.

When we could remember a song from the 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s, 90s.

But can you remember any pop song from the new millennium?

I sure can not. And for the most part, I do not want to, it's that terrible.

Rest in peace Pop, we had fun for a little while.

The Music Gallery: Can Music Ever Be Valued As Fine Art?

Introduction: The Highest Art Auction in History Recently a Christie's art sale became the highest auction in history. The sale included works by Jackson Pollock, Roy Lichtenstein and Jean-Michel Basquiat, among others and in total generated $ 495 million. The sale established 16 new world auction records, with nine works selling for more than $…

Introduction: The Highest Art Auction in History

Recently a Christie's art sale became the highest auction in history. The sale included works by Jackson Pollock, Roy Lichtenstein and Jean-Michel Basquiat, among others and in total generated $ 495 million. The sale established 16 new world auction records, with nine works selling for more than $ 10m (£ 6.6m) and 23 for more than $ 5m (£ 3.2m). Christie's said the record breaking sales reflected “a new era in the art market”.

The top lot of Wednesday's sale was Pollock's drip painting Number 19, 1948, which fetched $ 58.4m (£ 38.3m) – nearly twice its pre-sale estimate.

Lichtenstein's Woman with Flowered Hat sold for $ 56.1 million, while another Basquiat work, Dustheads (top of article), went for $ 48.8 million.

All three works set the highest prices ever fetched for the artists at auction. Christie's described the $ 495,021,500 total – which included responsibilities – as “staggering”. Only four of the 70 lots on offer went unsold.

In addition, a 1968 oil painting by Gerhard Richter has set a new record for the highest auction price achieved by a living artist. Richter's photo-painting Domplatz, Mailand (Cathedral Square, Milan) sold for $ 37.1 million (£ 24.4 million). Sotheby's described Domplatz, Mailand, which depicts a cityscape painted in a style that suggests a blurred photograph, as a “masterpiece of 20th Century art” and the “epitome” of the artist's 1960s photo-painting canon. Don Bryant, founder of Napa Valley's Bryant Family Vineyard and the painting's new owner, said the work “just knocks me over”.

Brett Gorvy, head of post-war and contemporary art, said “The remarkable bidding and record prices set reflect a new era in the art market,” he said. Steven Murphy, CEO of Christie's International, said new collectors were helping drive the boom.

Myths of the Music-Fine Art Price Differential

When I came across this article I was stunned at the prices these artwork were able to obtain. Several of them would severely evoke a positive emotional response in me, while others might only slightly, but for almost all of them I really do not understand how their prices are reflected in the work, and vice versa. Obviously, these pieces were not intended for people like me, an artist, while wealthy patrons certainly see their intrinsic artistic value clearly.

So why does not music attract these kinds of prices? Is it even possible for a piece of recorded music, not music memorabilia or a music artifact (such as a rare record, LP, bootleg, T-shirt, album artwork, etc.), to be worth $ 1 million or more? Are all musicians and music composers doomed to struggle in the music industry and claw their way up into a career in music? If one painting can be valued at $ 1 million, why can not a song or piece of music also be valued similarly? Appropriately, the $ .99 per download price is the highest price a song is able to command at market value, no matter what its quality or content, and the musician or composer must accept this value as such.

The financial equation looks something like this:

1 painting = $ 37 million

1 song = $ .99

Sometimes people say that a song can change the world, but no one ever says that about paintings. So theoretically, if people want change $ .99 is the price we must pay for it.

Now here are a few statements that should help us clarify what the monetary or value discrepancy between painting and music is based upon.

(1) There are fewer painters than there are musicians.

(2) Musicians are less talented than painters?

(3) It is easier to create music than it is to paint.

(4) The public values ​​paintings more than music.

(5) Paintings are more beautiful than music.

(6) Paintings are impossible to copy like music.

(7) Painters work harder than musicians and composers.

8 Blah, blah, blah.

Hardly anyone agrees with all of these statements and yet all, or at least some of them, would have to be true in order for the price of paintings to so greatly exceed the cost of music. Moreover, I doubt that art collectors and great painters have to deal with as much legal red tape as do musicians when releasing their work into the public domain, so why are not the rewards equal, if not greater for musicians who have to work almost as much protecting their work as in producing it. Musicians and composers, however, actually must do more than authenticate their work and obtain accurate appraisals concerning what their work is worth, but they get paid less. The equipment costs alone for musicians is much higher than it is for painters.

Maybe it's fame, and not money, musicians are after? That would explain why most musicians settle for the low pay they receive from record deals and digital downloads. Perhaps, that's also why many of them are touring more often to increase their fame and not their fortunes. But wait a minute, that's where musicians actually make most of their money from live performances and the selling of merchandise, but not the music. I guess this is why many musicians see themselves not as composers, but rather as performers and entertainers.

So what can musicians do, who do not see themselves as entertainers, but instead as composers who create music as a fine art? Because they too have a strong desire to earn a living to support themselves in their profession, so there must be a specialized approach wheree they present their work to music lovers or art collectors in search of assets and curators for unique pieces to place in their private galleries. Imagine that, a recorded piece of music that few have ever heard which is displayed and played only on a specified music player in a private art gallery or collection.

In thinking about how a musician can follow the example set by painters in the fine arts, I've isolated 4 principles that should help to make the spectacular financial rewards that they've reached possible for the musician. So let's analyze some of the characteristics that govern the market for fine art and see how musicians can apply these concepts to their creative, production, and marketing processes.

The Ideal Vehicle for Music as Fine Art

Here are 4 principles and practical suggestions for musicians who want to elevate their music into the realm of fine art by following the example of the painters of the past and present.

1) Strive to make unique music or music collections.

The composer must design experiments with sound or compositional techniques. Some music belong in the realm of the public, while other music solely belongs to the realm of fine art. It's really not that difficult to tell the difference. The difference is clear when one compares the environment of the nightclub and the music one finds there with the elevated environment of the ballet or opera and its music. The difference is not necessarily one in terms of types of music, but rather in the composer's sonic fingerprint. In other words, not everyone thinks Jackson Pollock was a great painter, but everyone acknowledges that it took him years of development to reach a point where his style could be born. It's the style of the artist or composer that will call out to the attention of wealthy patrons, the respect of peers, and the exclusive admiration of the music appreciator. In music, the style of the composer, regardless of genre, I call 'a signature sound.' It's the signature sound that music and art collectors will want to own and for that they might be willing to pay or bid up the cost of ownership to a higher price.

2) Create a music gallery.

This could have been modeled after the art gallery where one or several artist put their work on display. The difference with the music gallery is that you would have a hall filled with listening rooms or stations. These showings would not be live performances, but instead will be in effect sound installations. You could also separate one hall into several compartments for different composers. The music showing would be an exclusive event provided to serious music and art collectors who actively seek out sonic experiences and buy what they like. The purpose of the music gallery would be the same as the art gallery – to give the public a sample of the artist's talent, to give critics something to write about, to have other composers comment on the work of a peer, and to create buzz in the art world. Always remember that it should not be the event that drives the buzz, but the music that makes the event.

3) Turn your music into a tangible asset.

The obvious difference between a painting and music is that one is a tangible artwork and the other is not. In other words, one of the defining characteristics of a painting is that the medium and the art are one. Unlike music, where the music must be transferred onto another object such as a cassette tape, vinyl, CD, or mP3 player before it can be perceived, whereas with a painting (or sculpture) an object has been transformed into art. So how can it be or is it even possible for a cassette, CD, or download to be transformed into art? The cassette and CD are more akin to a photograph of a painting, rather than a true expressions where the medium and the art are one.

So one step a musician can take to elevate their music into fine art is by making your music and its medium one. The best way that I can think of to do this is by looking to the past. Ironically, the vinyl LP very closely achieved this quality with album art, its sizing, and packaging. Let's quickly discuss some of the qualities of the vinyl LP and valuable marketing angles that I think opens up interesting approaches for musicians to turn their music into fine art at price appropriate levels commiserate with learning a livelihood.

Today there are several companies around that let you customize your LP vinyl album and artwork. This is wonderful because it gives you total control over the art direction your packaging takes. This is an expressive way to bring the personality of the artist, band, or project out into physical form. Many colors are available and unique mixtures are also possible to add a dimension to your music that is not normally possible with cassette tapes, CD's, or digital downloads. Even split colored and glow-in-the-dark vinyl are available for bold composers looking for something with a bit more flair.

Etched Art and Your Album

Another fantastic way to elevate the music via packaging and presentation is to consider etched art in vinyl. Etched vinyl is an image compressed into the unplayable side of your record which has a broken appearance. The etched side does not contain any grooves or music but adds a real touch of style to your music package. I do not know if etched art can also be a hologramic look, but that would be another dimension that would enhance the visual component of your music package.

Art and LP Sizes

The last aspect I'd like to touch on is the size of the LP. Unlike the cassettes and CD's, which both come in a single universal size determined by the media player, LP's are played on phonographs or turntables which arms can adjust to the different sizes of LP's. In general, LP's come in 3 sizes: 7 “, 10”, and 12. “And because the album covers have to provide a sleeve for a large surface, they correspondingly must also be large. an album cover that's 1 square foot. That's about 4 times the size of a standard CD and anywhere from 8 – 12 times the size of cassette tape.

Understanding this gives you an additional angle to design artwork for the music package. There might even be a way to design a painter's canvas that can house an LP within its frame to turn it into a cover. For those musicians and composers who possess multiple artistic talents, an original painting to accompany a music release could be another profitable approach to look into. If you think about it even further the size of the 12 “LP is actually the size of a small painting. The dual LP album cover would give you exactly a 24 “x 12” surface to work with.

The Non-Vinyl LP and other Miscellaneous Considerations

Other more sophisticated forms of the approach I'm describing here for the LP would keep the concept of the LP at the center of the music package, while removing the vinyl as material. Ideally, the perfect substance for a fine art music LP would consist of a material that did not warp, could not be shattered, that would prevent grooves from wearing out, and that would be scratch-proof. So that would mean you'd need to do your homework and find out what's possible with all known exotic substances, metal alloys, industrial metals, specialized plastics, and non-scratch surfaces to achieve the perfect substance for a fine art music LP. Moreover, this substance would play CD quality sound on any or a special turntable with a specifically designed needle made specifically for this material and album type.

If a fine art music LP were to ever come into existence it would have to stand the test of time and survive usage, storage, and travel as it transfers custody from one owner to another over decades and even centuries. These are the main reasons why owners of fine art music LP's will need to get insurance for the asset. A non-vinyl LP could also be manufactured to blow away the art collector, music enthusiast, and investor with something like an LP made of 24-karat gold or some other precious metal like silver or platinum. This one alteration could make such an LP worth a $ 1 million or more depending on the aggressiveness of the bidders. Overall you'll have to do some research of your own to discover what your options are and can be in order to raise your LP into the class of an investment, a tangible asset (collectible), and fine art. In the absence of the existence of this ideal substance, we must aim for novelty to achieve appeal.

Exclusive Music

Another aspect to explore briefly is the exclusivity factor in regards to the ownership of fine art. Not everyone can afford a Picasso, but those who can, generally, are not willing to share it with everyone because they want exclusive ownership over the Picasso, that's part of the package of owning fine art.

The way to provide exclusive ownership to interested parties is through contracts, so you'll have to hire legal advice to shape the legal framework governing ownership of a music album or music as fine art. The contract can be shaped in any number of ways according to your desires, but basically it should state what the owner has permission to do or is prohibited from doing with the work you are selling them. You want your buyers to know that they can transfer ownership of the album to heirs or sell it to other private collectors as you can with any other tangible asset. This is part of the process of owning fine art, which they've come to expect in their dealings with galleries and other collectors, so deal with them as a professional.

In addition, you'll want to legally prohibit the buyers from broadcasting or dissolving the music from your fine art LP or other media. To reserve its value the music must be kept out of the public domain and remain in the hands of those who have the right to hear it. If the owners want to talk about it and even play it for a small gathering of people as a fine art music exhibit then great, but they should not be allowed to make copies or profit from your records.

The beauty of a limit supply and contracts is that together they will help you to track all of the owners over your lifetime and preserve the value of your work. If one of them can be found to be responsible for leaking the material out into public, you'll have a lawsuit on your hands which you should easily win. But if a leak was to happen, the value (price) of the LP might drop precipitously and demand could even dry up completely. But really what's the worst that could happen, that the price of your music ends up at the low end of the price scale – $ .99 per track?

A Word on Supply and Demand

Similarly, the law of supply and demand must also be part of the equation for pricing your music as fine art. Basically, the law of supply and demand works like this: the greater the supply, the lower the demand and the lower the supply, the greater the demand. In other words, the more of something there is, the less it's worth and the less of something there is, the more it's worth. The law does not always work out this perfectly, but as a general rule it works.

The problem with this law is that it only takes slowly into account mass psychology and the way demand is created, which is by advertising, marketing, and PR (public relations). Without these 3 factors working in your favor, there will be little or no demand for your fine art music LP, no matter how small your supply is. It's only when these 3 factors are working in your favor and demand is fairly high that the price of your single or limited edition fine art music LP, CD, or digital audio files can rise and skyrocket. So become fluent with hope to employ advertising, marketing, and PR and make sure the demand is there among your target audience prior to releasing your work so that you can be certain your album receives a high bidding.

A Digital Point of View

Some of the ideas I've presented here so far can be applied to music in digital formats as well. For example, a limited edition, gorgeously designed iPod or alternative mP3 player with your fine art music programmed into a locked memory is one approach. For example, high-end buyers there's an iPod available that's made from 22k gold and it features an Apple logo made of diamonds, it estimate price is roughly $ 120,000.

Something like this could work or even just a really cool looking, READ-only thumb drive could work. You just plug it in and enjoy exclusive access to an album that only one collector or a select few have in their possession.

The number one problem with a digital format is that it's too easy to copy files from one device to another, which is why a locked or unhackable memory is critical. Without the locked memory, the exclusivity factor can not exist and undermines the creation of a fine art music digital device.

4) Put your music to auction.

Part of the reason why the paintings in the beginning of this article sold for so much money is because competitive bids pushed the price upward. After you've designed an amazing fine art music collection and package, you'll need to decide how to sell or auction your product.

But eBay is probably the best place to sell fine art music this way. To start it might be a good place to test the concept, but you might not reach your target clientele. Another option could be Bandcamp or Amazon, but there's no auctioning available with these companies. However, you could set a high price for downloads, CD's or vinyl LP's and sell few of them.

For example, downloads might go for anywhere from $ 15 to $ 200 per track and for the album maybe the price of a mid-range painting, sometimes $ 800 to $ 2,000 +.

You could also set up a simple website where you present and sell your fine art music like painters, sculptors, sketch artists, wood workers, and artisans sell their work. On your site you can talk about your album on video, with a music blog, on internet radio, through interviews, on music or artists-oriented podcasts, and through articles, so that you can send all the traffic to your eBay page or personal website where all you're selling are copies of your limited edition collection of fine art music.

The simplicity of this plan is that you, along with eBay as your broker, control the entire process. The idea here is as with most auctions which is to watch the bidders compete with one another as everyone watches the price go higher and higher.

Name Your Price: The Radiohead Experiment

The band Radiohead did something like this but differently. Instead of auctioning a one of a kind or limited edition exclusive digital album, they allowed their fans to pay what they wanted for their new release at the time. The experiment bought in mixed results but overall was a success for the band members who made more money personally than on any previous album. However, it's been reported that 38% of buyers spent an average of $ 6, while the other 62% downloaded the album without paying anything at all – $ 0. Globally, the average price paid was around $ 2.26 and $ 3.23 in the US Of those who did pay something, 17% paid below $ 4, but 12% paid between $ 8 and $ 12.

This approach is unquestionably to work for lesser known artists who want to present their music as fine art. The main reason why it would not is because it fails to fulfill the factor of exclusive ownership. Everyone and anyone could get a copy of the Radiohead album, therefore it's value is reduced because the quantity available was infinite instead of limited or rare, since the demand was high.

NIN and a Tiered Approach

Likewise, tiered fine art music packages which prices range from a few dollars up to hundreds or even thousands of dollars is a much better way to entice collectors to buy music as fine art or music as an investment.

Here's how Nine Inch Nail's Trent Reznor made a small fortune with his “Ghosts I – IV” album release. In total 5 tiers are available.

The first tier offers a free download of the first 9 tracks from the album.

The 2nd tier offers a $ 5 digital download with a 40 page PDF.

The 3rd tier offers a 2 CD's with a 16 page booklet for $ 10.

The 4th tier is a $ 75 deluxe edition which includes 2 audio CD's, a data DVD with all 36 tracks in multi-track format, a 48 page book of photographs by Phillip Graybill and Rob Sheridan, a 40 page PDF book, and an accompanying slideshow on a Blu-Ray disc.

And on the 5th tier you get pretty much everything else on the lower tiers except you also get a 3rd book with art prints of imagery from Ghosts I – IV and each limited edition copy is numbered and personally signed by Trent Reznor. This limited edition was restricted to 2500 copies with a limit of one per customer for a grand total of $ 300. The $ 300 tier was known as the Ultra-Deluxe Limited Edition Package and is currently sold out.

The financials on the 5th tier look pretty good. With the Ultra-Deluxe Limited Edition Package, we know there were only 2500 copies and that each sold for $ 300. So, 2500 x 300 = $ 750,000. Imagine what prices could have been reached if Reznor had allowed the buyers to bid on the Ultra-Deluxe Limited Edition Package. He could have started the bidding at or just below $ 300 and watched the prices go up from there. Interestingly, as fewer of them were available the prices might have started to get astronomical. He probably still would have sold every copy and his income might well have been closer to $ 1 million, but either he did a great job structuring his price scale as demonstrated by his results. And let's not forget that our equation excluded the income he generated from tiers 2 – 4, which most certainly bought his total revenues far passed $ 1 million.

Review

As we end off let's briefly review the factors that will lead to fine art music success.

1) Strive to make unique music or music collections. To do this you'll need to experiment with unique methods, techniques, or styles that offer a signature sound. In the art world, this will be known as your sonic fingerprint. This is what art collectors will want to purchase and appreciate.

2) Create a music gallery. Come up with ideas for how to present your new compositions at a music exhibit. It should look and feel much like an art exhibit, but be adapted for music. This may include setting up private listening stations for individual art collectors or small rooms for a limited listening audience and where auctions can occur.

3) Turn your music into a tangible asset. Painting elevates the canvas and paint into art, whereas music can never elevate a cassette tape or CD into art. For music, the medium must be turned into art as part of the package for presenting music as fine art. Painting also elevates and transforms its medium, while music is usually transported by its medium, except its digital, then it's all about the music. Remember what we discussed about digital formats and the vinyl LP as ideal vehicles for selling music as fine art.

4) Above all, offer exclusivity as an essential part of the package of fine art music ownership, so find ways to guarantee this for your buyers. Art ownership is firmly based on its exclusivity, which for the collector means that they are part of a very select group of individuals who have the right or privilege to receive exposure to your fine art music. If you can exclude the masses and create demand among a select few, then the prices you can attract will rise as few buyers try to outbid one another for exclusive ownership of your music.

5) Lastly, use an auction system to create massive profits. Keep the law of supply and demand in mind when building your music into a tangible asset and do not forget the vital role advertising, marketing, and PR play in creating demand. There's no purpose in creating a limited supply of anything for which there is no demand.

Conclusion

These are by no means all of the ways in which these ideas can be applied to your situation or in these formats, but whatever you choose to do you'll need to form the right balance of factors that make the price of your fine art music rise. Many of you may be amazed by the amount of initial investment capital you¡¯ll require to elevate your music into a fine art collectible, which is why you'll have to amplify your people skills and take courses in sales training, marketing, investing and business. Several of the approaches I mentioned will require you to raise capital from a bank, institution such as a private equity firm, or venture capitalists to get you started, otherwise you'll need to get access to personal or small business credit at low interest rates . This will give you more time to implement your program and generate your first wave of sales.

If your business plan for turning your music into fine art is solid and your sales presentation is thorough, then the money will find you as more investors see profit in the opportunity. Additionally, wealthy patrons may see your work as an important contribution to art history or your presentation may just resonate with an investor or group of investors that they may just give you money to finish your project. In either case, be business-like, get all of your agreements in writing and have them reviewed by a competent legal representative expert at intellectual property issues and financial transactions in particular.

Sheet Music (1974)

1974 proved one of the more eclectic years in pop music. Sparks were fronted by an effeminate bohemian and a keyboard player with a Hitler moustache. Roxy Music had an album graced by two naked German beauties. Queen released their finest work, an amalgamation of white and black theatrics. 'The Beach' showed Neil Young baring…

1974 proved one of the more eclectic years in pop music. Sparks were fronted by an effeminate bohemian and a keyboard player with a Hitler moustache. Roxy Music had an album graced by two naked German beauties. Queen released their finest work, an amalgamation of white and black theatrics. 'The Beach' showed Neil Young baring his soul, following Bob Dylan's footsteps a year prior. Among all that, Northern English rockers 10cc thread in their sophomore record, an astute combination of pop invention and recommendation.

Hailed as the Beatles of the seventies, 10cc had something not even The Beatles had (my apologies to Mr. Starr): four accomplished writers and singers, each brimming with ideas, each capable of turning an odd idea into a great hit. No George Martin was needed, each a competent producer, Stewart's technical know-how served him well as resident engineer at Strawberry Recording Studios.

Furthering The Beatles analogy, 10cc had one McCartney songwriting partnership brimming with pop melodies and wonderful tunes, guitarist Eric Stewart and bassist Graham Gouldman, giving the album it's most evident hit, 'The Wall Street Shuffle' (prior to joining 10cc, Gouldman had written beloved sixties hits for The Yardbirds and The Hollies as a songwriter for hire). Their John Lennon counterparts, second guitarist Lol Creme and drummer Kevin Godley, thread esoteric lyrics and avant garde sensibilities into their songs, though despite going further left that direction than Lennon ever did – 'Clockwork Creep'ave a perspective of a bomb, from the mindset of the bomb itself – even Gainsbourg didn't do that! Nor where they afraid to swap writing partners,'SiIlly Love'a fine piece combining Stewart's ear for guitar melodies and Creme's accomplished use of wordplay – “you take the beauty out of beautiful / You play the strings of my heart / Oh babe, you take the wonder out of wonderful / Oh my, oh my, and my, if you were mine “, making for one of the more idiosyncratic pieces of the seventies.

Understandably, such different factions led to a break-up two years later, Godley and Creme turning their cinematic artistic sensibilities into filming music videos for Sting, Frankie Goes to Hollywood and Duran Duran, while the other two bravely ventured on as '10cc, learning a worthwhile no.1 in 1978 with inspired reggae track'Dreadlock Holiday'.

But never where they better than as a four piece, 'The Sacro Lilliac' one of the finer examples of a ska- beat by English musicians, Gouldman and Godley bouncing and harmonizing well off each other,'Oh Effendi' as perfect to Caribbean brilliance as any are likely to hear; sung by Godley, he had the strongest voice of the four, something which Creme and Gouldman have re-iterated through the years. 'The Worst Band in The World' is one of the finest pieces of tongue in cheek art, ersatz to the extreme, incorporating a melange of styles, pop, rock, even baroque – a song of the worst band in the world played by one of the best bands in the world.

'Sheet Music' proved a worthwhile addition to the ever growing palette of musical styles thrown at the time. The album's greatest service was in its songwriting prowess. A band with no distinct frontman (Creme had the closest personality to the wild men of the seventies with his long, lucid hair and Stewart was certainly the best looking, though none was nominated themselves as anything more than artists and musicians), the band's legacy depended on its songwriting ability. And'Sheet Music' managed the fine line between ingenuity and modesty that their succeeding records failed to manage. “Our best album” written Gouldman (the only original member who still plays live with 10cc to this day), “epitomising what 10cc was all about. Unique songwriting and production.”

7 Types and Roles of Music Producers in the Industry

A music producer is someone who is responsible for the development, recording, engineering and overall management of music. Being similar to a film director in nature, a producer is responsible for big things like studio production to small things like proper functionality of the sound board and other musical instruments. In short, a producer has…

A music producer is someone who is responsible for the development, recording, engineering and overall management of music. Being similar to a film director in nature, a producer is responsible for big things like studio production to small things like proper functionality of the sound board and other musical instruments. In short, a producer has to make sure that every detail is aligned with the desired output of the music produced. Let's explore different types of producers we have in business and their relevant roles.

  1. The Engineer

An engineer is responsible for technical aspects of music production like compression settings, drum sounds, etc. The studio itself is an instrument to an engineer and he is hands on with all minor and major technical details. Engineers are known to spend late hours in night in order to create the perfect musical masterpiece.

  1. The Mentor

A mentor does not need to have the technical expertise an engineer may possess. The difference between a mentor and an engineer is the same as a soccer player and his coach. The player is instilled with the required technique to score and win. But the coach has the correct strategies designed for that player on how to get the job done. A mentor has extensive knowledge is many genres of music, the target market, overall impact, lesson given by the music produced, etc. One of the gifts a mentor possesses he inspires and invigorates artists on focusing their strengths on producing the best track.

  1. The Remixer

Most people think that remix is ​​newly found change in music. But in reality the concept of remix dates back to mid-70s. A remixer is concerned with choosing a track and cutting or applying some other effects to produce a new version of the existing music. Nowadays remixes have grown so popular that sometimes it outshines the original music itself.

  1. The Musician

A musician possesses the basic most skills of music like recording instrumental and vocal parts of a track. Additional responsibilities include contributing and advising on songwriting, arrangement and performance of an artist.

  1. The Artist

Some producers may produce, compose, arrange and perform on their own music. These types are generally termed as artists. As for the technical expertise, recording artists work on their own produced music. They write and compose their own music, add instruments and vocal effects.

  1. The Technical

Technical producers work as a combination of an artist and an engineer. They use musical instruments to enhance the quality of individual tracks and mix other tracks to create a wholly new one, for eg, a mashup . These producers are known to play with the sound effects by polishing certain sounds. Their extensive knowledge in which sounds disrupt or enhance the flow and rhythm of song enables them to apply numerous variations that make the song better than before.

  1. The Executive

Ideally an executive producer possesses all the quality of a music producers , have some technical skills as well. Apart from these responsibilities an executive is also concerned with the overall studio management, can provide an opinion as to who will be the part of studio personnel, guests artists, etc. He is well aware as how to produce a masterpiece within the budget allotted by the studio in the best manner possible.