Top 3 Reasons for Songwriters to Invest in Intellectual Property

If you are a musician or songwriter, and you think you've got what it takes to write great songs for the international market, then it's about time you consider investing in intellectual property. This article will not only aim to expound on the term intellectual property, it will also elaborate on the three reasons why…

If you are a musician or songwriter, and you think you've got what it takes to write great songs for the international market, then it's about time you consider investing in intellectual property. This article will not only aim to expound on the term intellectual property, it will also elaborate on the three reasons why creating music is a perfectly viable business proposal in itself. And then I will tie all of that in with the advantages of learning the basics of singing to expand your musical horizons. So let's begin.

You will probably be wondering why I specifically mentioned 'international market'. The reason is pretty simple. It is for the copyright laws in place that protect your work, and performing rights societies that pay you royalties on your works. That is reason number one for you to, especially, target creating music for markets that protect your musical work and by so doing, your bread and butter. The second reason why intellectual property is key to your success in the music business – even when you do not perform your own songs – is because you get to earn residual income. One of the big sources of publishing revenue you'll earn as a songwriter is performance royalties. But an even larger income stream comes from music publishing in mechanical royalties. In other words, every time a song you've written is manufactured to be sold on CD, downloaded from a digital music retail site, given radio airplay, streamed through services like Spotify, television, film and even played in bars and clubs, you are owed a mechanical royalty.

So how does all of this tie-in with the advantages of voice training for songwriters? Being a trained singer myself, I can tell you this for nothing: with a trained voice your ability to craft the songs you envision makes a whole lot easier and helps bring your imagination to life in dimensions way beyond your wildest dreams. I suppose the simplest way to put this is to say, if the magic is in you and your vocal instrument is able to deliver your vision, the sky truly is the limit. An even more brilliant way to explain this is to compare an artist who can only imagine beautiful images but is able to draw that on canvas, with one who can.

And now here's the third reason for songwriters to invest in intellectual property. Not everyone is of the ideal age or visual appearance to make it as an artist, but that does not mean you should give up on your dreams. Writing great songs for other artists is another, perhaps more subtle way, to a splendid income doing what you love best, creating music. I hope this article has helped shed light on what else you can do to achieve your dreams in the music business.

Conrad Narvesen: An Early New York Piano Maker From Norway

Conrad Narvesen established his piano business in 1847 in New York, and operated his company as a sole proprietor until he became a naturalized citizen in 1860. In 1861 he becomes partner with Ihlseng and Lindsted and the company reorganizes as Ihlseng, Narvesen & Lindsted. Lars G. Ihlseng was from Norway, who was a piano…

Conrad Narvesen established his piano business in 1847 in New York, and operated his company as a sole proprietor until he became a naturalized citizen in 1860.

In 1861 he becomes partner with Ihlseng and Lindsted and the company reorganizes as Ihlseng, Narvesen & Lindsted.

Lars G. Ihlseng was from Norway, who was a piano dealer before going into a short partnership with Narvesen.

Lindsted withdrew just just two years later in 1863. The firm reorganized as Ihlseng & Narvesen and they only survived a year together which ended by the end of 1864.

Now working alone, Narvesen was later joined by his son in 1869, and they worked together until 1877.

Narvesen, once again working alone, was joined by new partners in 1880 to form Narvesen, Bergmann & Haugaard.

In 1881, Richard M. Walters purchases Narvesen's piano business. Walters was an investor who also owned a retail business and an auction business. Narvesen, Bergmann & Haugaard all continue to work as superintendents for Walters in their relevant departments.

1885 – RM Walters moves the company to a better location in upstate New York. His company was well known for allowing customers to purchase musical instruments in installments.

In 1889, RM Walters who was a popular personality, was often featured in musical magazines. His photos depict a handsome and confident business man with a prominant mustache that becomes one with his sideburns. He wore well made suits often with a flower in his lapel.

He surrounded himself with other well known people. His business manager was William Barton Stone, a well known Indianapolis composer of “The Lambs Polka”, “The Souvenirs Song”, “The Drover Waltz”, and “The Parnell Funeral March”. Walters and Stone attended many charitable events, with Stone acting as the parade Sheriff on one occasion, and was noted as being a very good horseback rider.

Walters passes away in 1902 from Typhoid fever. He passed away at his brother's house and kept his illness secret until his death. His death came as a great shock to his friends.

I find no mention of the company after 1902, and it was most likely liquidated at this time.

I found an early ad of Narvesen and it is duplicated below:

Pianos! Pianos!

CONRAD NARVESEN

Manufacturer of

FIRST-CLASS

PIANO FORTES

71,73 & 75 East 22nd st.,

(Bet. 4th & Lexington Ave) New York.

The undersigned invites the attention of the public

And the trade generally to these celebrated instruments of his own manufacture, built of the best seasoned materials, having all the latest improvements.

FULL IRON FRAME, OVERSTRUNG BASS,

French Grand Action, Large Scale.

These piano foretes are not surpassed

For strength and beauty of finish, durability, purity, power and singing quality tone.

BY THOSE OF ANY MAKER IN THE COUNTRY.

They are warranted for the full term of 7 years.

The inspection of the musical public is respectfully solicited, Liberal Terms to Dealers, Teachers and Clergymen.

Circular price Lists sent up application.

CONRAD NARVESEN

71, 73, & 75 EAST 22nd St., New York

How To Use YouTube To Take Your Music Career To The Next Level

YouTube has been a HUGE promotion tool for millions of artists and if you're not taking advantage of it, you're definitely missing out. YouTube is the 3rd largest website it in the world (behind Google and Facebook) and it has become arguably the # 1 way to listen to, discover and share music. The idea…

YouTube has been a HUGE promotion tool for millions of artists and if you're not taking advantage of it, you're definitely missing out.

YouTube is the 3rd largest website it in the world (behind Google and Facebook) and it has become arguably the # 1 way to listen to, discover and share music.

The idea of ​​consumers “owning” music is fading and being replaced by streaming services like Spotify, Pandora and especially YouTube.

Convenience and cost are huge part of that shift, but “shareability” is also a huge factor. When we used to consume music solely through terrestrial radio, TV and physical media like CDs, it was really hard to share that music. Now with the click of a button, you can share it with literally millions of people. What does this mean for you as an artist? Get on YouTube!

Some tips:

1. Do not wait till you have a high budget music video to post something up. Of course you want everything you put out to be the highest quality you can, but not at the expense of not posting. You can use tools like TunesToTube to add a picture to an MP3 and post it up without knowing anything about editing video. You can record clips on your phone of you working in the studio, performing or just hanging out. Sometimes having something unpolished is better anyways because it's more authentic.

2. Post your YouTube videos on social networking sites like Twitter and Facebook and on forums. Part of what makes YouTube so convenient is people can stream those videos directly from the sites their already on instead of having to go to YouTube.com

3. Be persistent. With so much content to compete with, it may take some time before your videos catch on. Keep at it.

4. Consistently put out new material. Your audience will be hooked once they get to know you and your music. Do not leave them hanging, or else they'll go somewhere else for entertainment. Sticking to a weekly schedule is a great idea

5. Respond to comments. At a certain point it will not be realistic to respond to everything, but people want to feel like your relationship with them goes both ways and there's some interaction back and forth

But … do not worry about the haters. YouTube comments are notoriously filled with hilariously horrible and hateful comments. Try to have a sense of humor about it.

6. Use annotations and cards. Those are those boxes with text you see pop up on videos. You can use them to encourage people to subscribe to your channel, go to your website and check out other videos.

Avoiding The ‘360 Deal’ Snare

In an epic battle, suitable for a (relatively) big-budget YouTube video, an army of powerful but faltering giants faces off against a small but nimble band of rebels trying to secure their independence. Instead of a trailer for a new fantasy series, this is a decent description of the state of the music industry. Big…

In an epic battle, suitable for a (relatively) big-budget YouTube video, an army of powerful but faltering giants faces off against a small but nimble band of rebels trying to secure their independence.

Instead of a trailer for a new fantasy series, this is a decent description of the state of the music industry. Big record companies swing snares in the form of increasingly standard “360 deals,” while unsigned artists who value their artistic and financial independence try to go their own way by building a direct connection to their fans and supporters. One such connection gaining in popularity is Patreon.

Patreon, which was founded in 2013, is a crowdfunding platform. Unlike Kickstarter or GoFundMe, however, Patreon is not set up to fundraise for a one-time lump sum. Instead, the idea is that fans (or “patrons”) subscribe to support a particular artist's work over time. While Patreon is so far most popular with artists who run YouTube channels, it is also used by other musicians, podcast creators and webcomic artists.

Musician Nataly Dawn, who is half of the band Pomplamoose in addition to working as a solo performer, was an early and vocal supporter. (Her collaborator Jack Conte is Patreon's co-founder and CEO, although Dawn observed in a recent interview he has not been taking a salary in that position, instead earning his living from his music through Patreon and elsewhere. (1)) She has also lamented the fate of artists with labels who are not able to make a living after the label takes their cut of their earnings. And while many of the artists on Patreon have niche followings, a few larger artists have moved to the site, including a cappella group Pentatonix and singer-songwriter Amanda Palmer.

For a young artist, a 360 deal like the one Dawn criticized represents the opposite end of the spectrum from Patreon. Such deals have been around for years now, but are becoming increasingly dominant. An established record label has capital, connections, a brand name and access to other big companies, such as those specializing in tour management, ticketing or music video production. The label offers to use these resources to make an artist famous; in exchange, the label will take a cut of everything from tour revenue to merchandise to endorsement deals. Instead of simply selling the artist's records, the label inserts itself into every part of an artist's revenue stream.

On the other end of the scale, creators working collectively on their own take responsibility for developing their personal brand, delivering their product to fans (whether videos, songs or other pieces of art), and building a direct relationship with an audience. This direct artist-audience connection exists today in a form that has only been possible for the last decade or so, and it is what fuels a model like Patreon. While Patreon does take a 5 percent cut of commitments, it does not touch revenue from any other sources.

The implications of Patreon's model extend beyond music, and indeed musicians are not the only, or even the dominant, group to flock to the site. Filmmakers, especially those interested in the short film, were previously limited to audiences primarily at universities and film festivals, but now have the means to reach any interested viewer with a sufficient fast Internet connection. Podcasters, which platform exploded in popularity with last year's “Serial,” have long relied on voluntary listener agreements; they now have a new option for structuring that income. Investigative journalists who make a name for themselves have an option to garner support for a project free of some of the pressures that come from working with a traditional publication. Opinion writers may be able to draw on their audiences too. Fiction authors might even avail themselves, suggesting the potential return of the serialized narrative in a much larger way. Some of the artists on Patreon already offer creations in more than one of these forms.

The idea of ​​artists supporting themselves without middlemen such as publishers or record labels is not new, and it did not originate with Patreon. But Patreon offers a relatively centralized way for a consumer to support a menu of creators, and in that, it is an interesting development. It's a reliably new company, but as of March, its Google search traffic had roughly doubled over the past year, suggesting there is a market for what Billboard called “an online tip jar.” (2)

Not long ago, I talked to an experienced music business executive. I asked her why any artist these days would sign a 360 deal. She told me that the artists who do often feel that they lack options, and see such deals as the only way to get distribution on the radio and cable TV channels that promote music. This may still be true; these distribution channels are still a big lever for traditional labels.

But the trends are pretty clear. Once upon a time, radio play sold records. These days, music sales are not the main revenue source for most artists. Artists make some money from streaming services such as Spotify, but generally not much. Instead, most of their revenue comes from ticket sales, merchandising and advertising – notably ads on YouTube videos. All of these avenues rely on the artist's personal popularity with fans. While labels do have the resources to help increase this popularity through exposure, exposure alone is not enough.

Popularity these days is often built on direct personal engagement. Taylor Swift had a record deal early in her career, but she would never have become the phenomenon she is without her personal stream of tweets, posts and likes. This summer, Swift made waves by sending heartfelt responses to fans tagging her on Instagram. Through this engagement, her fans have come to love her as a person as much as an artist. No label could have done that for her. An artist coming up today, hoping to be the next Taylor Swift, would have less incentive to spend time and energy on this sort of goodwill-building with a 360 deal in place.

But much more than for the Taylor Swifts of the world, Patreon and similar funding mechanisms are for talents who have not already broken into the wider cultural conversation. Patreon may allow less-known talents, who may have only cultured a niche audience, to assemble that audience on a large enough scale to support themselves and their work.

Of course the fact that they can be self-sustaining in theory does not mean that every artist will be in reality. Convincing enough of their fans to become paying patrons will probably be a struggle for newer and smaller artists. A quick browse through Patreon users shows that for every project generating thousands of dollars per video, many others are making more like $ 40 or $ 50. While this is still more than many artists make on YouTube ad revenue alone, it's not enough for most artists to quit their day jobs. Patreon's repeating subscriptions can also be set up on a per month or a per creation basis. If a YouTuber is set up on the latter model and the rent is coming due, there's a temptation to push out subpar content in a hurry. The penalty is built in, however: Do this regularly, and you'll lose your subscribers.

At the end of the day, what separates the Davids of Patreon from the Goliaths of the record labels is what their business models produce. The Goliaths, who can always find another star-in-the-making to promote, make their money from content that, in many cases, would have been created anyway. The Davids, with the help of their patrons, are adding appreciatively to our pool of cultural wealth.

Sources:

1) Calling All Creators , “21 – Nataly Dawn”

2) Billboard , “Two Years In, Patreon's Update of the Crowdfunding Model Seems to Be Working”

Adler: The Piano and Organ Manufacturer of Louisville, Kentucky

The company started in 1903 by Cyrus Adler and RS Hill in Louisville, Kentucky strictly as an Organ Manufacturer. As was common with many large manufacturers, the partnerships often consist of an investor and an expert craftsman. Adler was a successful owner of a large lumber company. RS Hill was from the Mason & Hamlin…

The company started in 1903 by Cyrus Adler and RS Hill in Louisville, Kentucky strictly as an Organ Manufacturer. As was common with many large manufacturers, the partnerships often consist of an investor and an expert craftsman. Adler was a successful owner of a large lumber company. RS Hill was from the Mason & Hamlin factory. Hill would be the Superintendent who designed the instruments and managed their construction and quality.

Louisville, Kentucky was an odd location, considering that most manufacturers chose New York, Chicago, and Boston as more ideal locations. Adler chose Louisville due to its good railroad access, and felt confident that the location would be profitable. Adler moved into an existing building that had previously been occupied by a furniture company.

In 1904, plans for a large plant were drawn up to be built across the street. But a dispute arose with the city council members. Adler wanted a simple switch installed and rail to connect the two plants. Some council members subjected to the plans for no apparent reason, and petty arguments ensued. Occasionally, the new building project was scrapped, resulting in hundreds of lost construction jobs.

A fire started in the packaging room which destroyed a part of the building. The damage was around $ 15,000 (approx. $ 380,000 today). Full credit was given to the firemen, otherwise all would have been lost. Water, to put out the fire with, caused extensive damage to the instruments however.

Adler produced a grand and glorious exhibit at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St Louis. This was the expo that introduced the ice cream cone. Apparent the Exhibit was a success as they had obtained a five year contract with Sears & Roebuck to construct the Beckwith Organ.

Within the next year they had 100 employees earning $ 50- $ 150 per month.

The factory was eventually extended to 100,000 square feet and occupied an entire city block. The company had its own power plant of 350 horsepower and 500 electric lights with over ten miles of electric wire.

The company was shipping out 40 organs per day and became the largest manufacturer in Louisville at the time. Between 1910 and 1928 they were also building Adler pianos, known to the public as the Beckwith piano as sold by Sears through their Catalogs.

Adler Manufacturing, as well as the Geo. P. Bent Piano company would eventually be purchased by the Sears & Roebuck Company, which would continue to sell pianos and organs all the way up until 1949.

Blasius and Sons: The High Quality Piano Favored by Thomas Edison

Charles Blasius was a native of Cologne Germany, and he came to America when he was 25 years old. After working for a number of other piano makers, he established his company in 1855 under the name of Blasius Brothers in Philadelphia on 1006 Chestnut Street. This was a Piano Alley, if you will, with…

Charles Blasius was a native of Cologne Germany, and he came to America when he was 25 years old.

After working for a number of other piano makers, he established his company in 1855 under the name of Blasius Brothers in Philadelphia on 1006 Chestnut Street. This was a Piano Alley, if you will, with Chickering and Sons, Decker Brothers, and Steinway warerooms on the same street.

In 1857, he parts ways with his brothers as business partners, and Charles changes the name of the firm to Blasius and Sons, with the admission of his two sons Levi and Oscar as partners.

In 1887, Blasius took control of the Charles Albrecht Piano Company, which was one of the oldest piano manufacturers in America. Along with the Albrecht name, Blasius & Sons also built pianos under the “Regent” brand name as an affordable alternative to his costlier Blasius brand.

It is always a good business practice to offer a customer several choices.

Because of their high cost when new, Blasius pianos were never built on a huge scale like many other American piano manufacturers.

Thomas Edison was very fond of and endorsed the Blasius piano, and used them in his experiments. He was conducting an experiment with the piano and phonograph. Here is a letter Edison wrote to Blasius in December of 1894.

“Dear Sirs,

We are still experimenting with your piano in connection with the phonograph. We are not yet satisfied with the phonographic reproduction, but the piano itself is very fine. We will continue until we have reproduced the original with all it's richness of tone.

Yours Truly,

Thomas Edison ”

I can tell you as a piano technician, that Edison probably did not succeed in reproducing the “richness of tone” of the piano with the phonograph.

Charles Blasius dies in 1894, and the company was sold to Preston Rice, and Philip Wuest, owners of the Rice-Wuest piano company,

Around 1916 having trouble keeping up with orders and outgrowing their Philadelphia building, they take on the task of moving to a larger building in Woodbury, New Jersey, relocating over 400 employees and their families.

Woodbury, NJ was offering “no taxes for five years” to encourage businesses to move there. In the meanime, they began leasing the Philadelphia building to various companies.

By 1919 (the ending of World War 1) the company was financially in trouble filming dissolution in New Jersey. They move back to the smaller Philadelphia building, and tried to keep the company going, but they went out of business in 1925.

Note:

The historic building in Philadelphia was destroyed in 1970. The Woodbury, New Jersey building burned down due to a disgruntled employee, who even shut off the sprinkler system before starting one of the worst fires in New Jersey history.

If It Doesn’t Have 12,116 Genuine Steinway Parts, It Isn’t a Steinway, Really?

Steinway as a business realized that the restoration part of the piano business is big business, and they wanted a part of it. It turns out that the largest competitor of Steinway is the restoration of used Steinways. So let's put this 'genuine parts' thing under the microscope so that you, the Steinway piano owner,…

Steinway as a business realized that the restoration part of the piano business is big business, and they wanted a part of it. It turns out that the largest competitor of Steinway is the restoration of used Steinways.

So let's put this 'genuine parts' thing under the microscope so that you, the Steinway piano owner, can make a better decision when it comes to the restoration of your heirloom piano.

NO LONGER THE OWNERS

If missing a single part means it's no longer a Steinway, then neither is a Steinway. The Steinway family sold the business in 1963 to CBS. After that, the lines of distinction are blurred as to family participation.

The last recorded family member to work at Steinway was Henry Z. Steinway. He is recorded as the last President up to 1977 (remember it's owned by CBS).

It is also said that he worked at the factory (signing custom limited editions) until his death in 2008 at the age of 93. This stuck me as odd. How many 93 year old multi-millionaires do you know that work at a factory?

Regardless, even 2008 represents 7 years without a Steinway family member. That's a big part missing. The company is currently owned by Paulsen and Co., an Investment Management Company.

NOT EVERY SINGLE PART IS MADE AT THE FACTORY, BUT IS OUTSOURCED.

· Steinway does not make their Bass Strings, they are made by Mapes in Tennessee.

· Steinway does not make their finishes, they are made by Wurdack Industrial Finishes from St Louis MO.

· Steinway hammers are not voiced with Steinway lacquer, but are voiced with Wurdack Lacquer.

· Steinway does not own a forest, but they buy their wood from Fred Tebb and Sons in Tacoma Washington. Ask for their Steinway Grade Sitka Spruce, as anyone can buy it, but it will be expensive.

I found other companies that sell the same grade of Sitka Spruce, that comes from the same forest, at a much lower cost.

OTHER OUTSOURCING COMPANIES THAT WERE PURCHASED BY STEINWAY

· The Cast-Iron plates have been made by the OS Kelley Foundry since 1938. Recently Purchased.

· The Kluge Company makes action parts such as tuning pins, felts, whole actions. Recently purchased.

THE QUALITY OF PARTS

It's easy to assume that when a part comes in a box that says Steinway Genuine Parts, that it's the highest quality. But this is not necessarily so. Other action parts companies make Steinway duplicate parts, often of better quality. Tokiwa and Renner now have a long history of making action parts that are reliable and more affordable and do not take away the performance quality of the Steinway.

I once held all of the different parts side by side, and there was no special quality of the Steinway parts to distinguish it from the others.

THE HEART OF STEINWAY

The soundboard is made by an outbound process called a 'recipe'. This recipe is basically a Sitka Spruce panel glued with straight ribs of sugar pine that is discharged to 4-5% EMC. When it is glued into the piano it grows and crowns. That's it! Any experienced soundboard 'bellyman' can duplicate it.

CONCLUSION

As an illustration on how silly this whole parts thing is:

If I replaced one part in your Steinway with a Tokiwa part, and asked you to sit down and play the piano. Would you be able to tell me which note had the Tokiwa part?

I do not think so.

If you get anything out of this article I hope it is this: You can have your Steinway restored at the same high level, and at an affordable price, by shopping around, asking questions, and taking your time making a decision.

Strich & Zeidler: Two Steinway Employees Who Started Their Own Business

Paul M. Zeidler worked for Steinway (with his father) and had earned a reputation in the trade for his designs through his career. Zeidler's father and grandmother were piano makers from Braunschweig, Germany where Theodore Steinway was also from. Paul came to New York with his father in 1869, and after completing a course in…

Paul M. Zeidler worked for Steinway (with his father) and had earned a reputation in the trade for his designs through his career.

Zeidler's father and grandmother were piano makers from Braunschweig, Germany where Theodore Steinway was also from. Paul came to New York with his father in 1869, and after completing a course in engineering at the Cooper Institute, he went to work for the Steinway's in 1876.

While working for Steinway he made a lifelong friend in William Strich. William (b.1863) grew to love the piano at an early age, although forced to learn by his father, who was a well known music teacher. William's career started in 1881 by working for Steinway. William worked in every department, and in eight short years knew every phase of piano construction and became a master of the craft.

It was at this time in 1887 that his friend Paul Zeidler, decides to go to work for AB Chase. After AB Chase he also designed pianos for the Bell Piano and Organ Company in Ontario.

But just two years later Paul contacts William, and the two decide to start their own firm in 1889. Their reputation is greatly higher because of the high quality of their work, which often featured ornate cabinetry.

It was an unexpected surprise when Strich & Ziedler opened a display at the Columbian Exposition in 1893. Although their reputation had grown, they were still reliably young as a company, and it was a great expense in time and money to display at the Expo.

In 1896 they sue Albert Steinert of Steinert & Sons on charges of slander for $ 25,000. Steinert was overheard saying this to a piano dealer –

“This piano (Standing next to a Strich & Zeidler piano) is a low grade, cheap piano of the poorest workmanship, made by an unknown concern who are in difficulties now and about to go into bankruptcy. five hundred dollars went to protest “

This became a famous case in the piano trade. The court case was highlighted by the fact that Strich & Zeidler dismounted one of their pianos in the courtroom, to demonstrate their high quality craftsmanship. This lead to them being vindicated and awarded $ 5,000 in damages (approximately $ 125,000 today).

Strich and Zeidler pianos are of the highest quality and are worthy of restoration.

Further Notes:

1915 – They celebrate their 25th anniversary producing pianos.

1916 – The firm incorporated.

1917 – Strich and Zeidler unexpectedly liquidates and closes its doors.

1921 – Willian Strich is hospitalized for a year due to a car accident.

1922 – Zeidler designs pianos for Kohler and Campbell.

1926 – Zeidler designs pianos for Lester, 3 uprights (including the Betsy Ross Spinet) and 6 Grands.

1929 – Paul is featured in a full page article titled “Piano Scale Drafting a Matter of Science”, in which he discusses copying, guessing and the advancement of piano scales.

J. Bauer Piano Company: The Story of William Bauer, The Most Creative Piano Designer

We'll start with his father. Julius Bauer was born in Berlin on July 20, 1831. At an early age exhibited natural talent for constructing musical instruments and by the time he was 18, had accumulated many years of experience working on pianos and violins. At this time, the revolution of 1848 was erupting, so he…

We'll start with his father.

Julius Bauer was born in Berlin on July 20, 1831. At an early age exhibited natural talent for constructing musical instruments and by the time he was 18, had accumulated many years of experience working on pianos and violins. At this time, the revolution of 1848 was erupting, so he left for America and arrived in New York.

Immediately opening his own store, within 8 years his company had grown rapidly. He leaves his brother John in charge of the New York store and comes to Chicago in 1857 with his other brother Herman. They sold several piano brands such as Behning, Miller, McCammon, and Knabe.

In the great Chicago fire of 1871, his business was destroyed. For the next year and a half, he operated in a church while having a new building built. During this time of tragedy, his brother John dies, and so he closes down the New York branch.

Although Bauer started as a buyer, he soon began to build pianos that sold under his name. Bauer pianos became known for being exceptionally well made pianos.

With his success, Bauer was able to afford lavish warerooms in two major cities, Chicago and again in New York by 1880.

Julius dies in 1884 and his wife Anna Marie takes over management of the company.

Their son William was born in 1870, and after graduating from High School, he goes on a European vacation. When he arrives back in Chicago, he starts his career in the factory learning everything he can about pianos from the ground up.

Now the fun begins. William turned out to be a gifted piano maker with an inventive mind. In my opinion, he was one of the most original thinkers in piano technology history.

(The following may be a little technical.)

His designs seem to be based on stiffness. His plates are designed so that the string tension is placed in a horizontal plane inside the middle of the plate, whereas in a “regular” grand piano, the string tension is horizontally on top of the plate.

He goes one step further in his right. A major flaw with uprights is that the sound can be smothered by the cabinet. William tackles this issue by placing the soundboard in the back of the instrument for maximum sound exposure, but the plate and the strings are in the middle of the instrument. He connotes the soundboard to the bridge and strings with dowels.

Quite amazing!

I recommend that you should see his patents which are accessible online by searching Google Patents.

Another example of his unique approach is the soundboard itself. You can easily spot a Julius Bauer piano because his soundboards have ribs on the top and the bottom.

Later he even invented a piano with no steel plate at all. It features a wooden plate to replace the traditional cast-iron plate with the goal of giving the piano a sweeter tone.

His piano designs and methods of construction were very unique and highly praised in his day. Today they are worth a second look, and they are very much worth restoring.

He sold his company to the Wurlitzer Piano Company in 1930 being hit hard during the Great Depression.

Wurlitzer continued to build the Julius Bauer name up until about 1938.

Stultz and Bauer: The Tale of Two Piano Makers

This is a short story of two entrepreneur piano makers Henry Stultz and Frederick Bauer. Stultz seemed to have one hardship after another, while Bauer appeared to be stable through his career and successfully grew his business. Established in 1882 Henry Stultz Sr. and Frederick Bauer started the well known piano making firm of Stultz…

This is a short story of two entrepreneur piano makers Henry Stultz and Frederick Bauer. Stultz seemed to have one hardship after another, while Bauer appeared to be stable through his career and successfully grew his business.

Established in 1882 Henry Stultz Sr. and Frederick Bauer started the well known piano making firm of Stultz and Bauer. Frederick Bauer was related to Jacob Doll, another well known piano maker. The company quickly grow and in order to meet growing claims, the firm raised money by selling stock and incorporating in 1892.

Maybe 16 years is long enough for a partnership, and by 1896, Henry Stultz Sr.. leaves the firm and becomes partner in the Dolgeville Piano Case Company.

Bauer remains sole owner of Stultz & Bauer.

But two years later in 1898, the Dolge Piano Case Company goes into bankruptcy, and it sold at auction for $ 4,006 to the Jacob Brothers Piano Company.

Just a year later in 1899, Henry Stultz Sr. dies of Pneumonia at the young age of 52.

In 1900 Henry Stultz Jr. meets with the well known Piano action maker George Bothner. Henry and George, along with Charles Kretschmann start making pianos under Stultz and Co. Unfortunately, the company was short lived and in 1902 Stultz and Company go bankrupt. The Assets were bought by the large Bjur Brothers piano manufacturing company at auction.

Henry Stultz Jr. goes to work in the case making department of the Kohler and Campbell factory, but a year later in 1905 he again partners with George Bothner, and together they start the firm The Stultz Piano Case Company with $ 10,000.

The POMIW Union Journal reports the Stultz Piano Case Co. goes backrupt in 1907. Just a three year run.

In 1910, Charles and his brother George Stultz start the Stultz Bros. Piano Company. But the company is short lived because of slow economic conditions and with WW1 in 1914. George Stultz would later buy the Universal Piano Company, but this company was too short lived.

Times sure were changing quickly in the early 1920's, and in 1922 the Stultz and Bauer company introduced a whole new line of pianos that also included player pianos, but by 1927 went out of business.

Kohler & Campbell purchases the Stultz and Bauer company in 1928. Kohler and Campbell was one of the few companies to survive the Great Depression. Frederick would shortly after pass away in 1930.

Allmendinger: A Reed Organ Success Story

David Allmendinger founded the Ann Arbor Organ Works in 1872 in his home on the northwestern corner of Washington and First Streets in Anne Arbor, Michigan. The four story building is still there today. Allmendinger specialized in the making of Reed Organs. The reed organ at one time was more popular than the piano in…

David Allmendinger founded the Ann Arbor Organ Works in 1872 in his home on the northwestern corner of Washington and First Streets in Anne Arbor, Michigan. The four story building is still there today.

Allmendinger specialized in the making of Reed Organs. The reed organ at one time was more popular than the piano in rural areas because it was cheaper, did not require tuning as much as a piano, and it was much lighter in weight. Also the reed organ was a desirable alternative to the expensive pipe organ that many churches just could not afford.

Reed organs use a small piece of brass about a half inch wide, and one to five inches long mounted on blocks of wood. Foot pedal are attached to bellows and are operated by the feet while playing. The air created by the bellows is sucked between the reeds, similar to a harmonica.

By the 1860's, with the invention of steam power, mass production and lower prices became possible. Most towns larger in population than 25,000 more than likely had an organ factory.

David Allmendinger learned his craft from his future father-in-law Gottlieb Gaertner who was a master organ builder from Ludwigsburg, Germany. Gottlieb worked at Walker Pipe Organ Works and came to America in 1867 due to war and cholera in Germany. He moved to Anne Arbor because his sisters had moved there earlier.

Now starting completely over with limited funds, Gottlieb starts making reed organs in his garage. He made every single part by hand using just basic wood and metal working tools.

By 1871 Gottlieb grew the business and had 5 employees, one of whom was David Allmendinger.

Gottlieb decides to leave Anne Arbor and becomes a consultant / superintendent to other organ builders in Columbus, Ohio and Erie, Pennsylvania.

David buys Gottliebs equipment and starts the Ann Arbor Organ Works.
He later marries Gottliebs daughter.

By 1888 in order to meet demand, Allmendinger incorporates and raises $ 50,000 selling stock (That's approximately 1.3 Million dollars today). The name of the company also changed to The Ann Arbor Organ and Piano Company.

By 1910, even though the population of Anne Arbor was only 15,000, the company was making 5,000 reed organs and 600 pianos a year and employed 120 people.

With the growing popularity of the phonograph, coupled with the uprising of WW1 Allmendinger decides to sell the company in 1915.

The company was bought by James C. Henderson who continued the name but quit just four years later in 1919.

Baumeister Piano Company: First US Woman Piano Maker Suffers Through Fires and Lawsuits

Charles Baumeister was an experienced piano maker who was born in 1844 in Frankfurt, Germany who had moved to the United States around 1867 with his wife Ida. In 1884 he partners with Augustus Baus (a clerk with the Behning Piano Company) to start manufacturing pianos under the Baus name. Being very inventive, he filed…

Charles Baumeister was an experienced piano maker who was born in 1844 in Frankfurt, Germany who had moved to the United States around 1867 with his wife Ida.

In 1884 he partners with Augustus Baus (a clerk with the Behning Piano Company) to start manufacturing pianos under the Baus name. Being very inventive, he filed several patents for the designs of their pianos in 1885.

In 1886 the business was totally destroyed by fire and Charles almost escaped with his life trying to save his employees. He was hospitalized from his burns.

The fire destroyed the company and they were forced to file bankruptcy in 1887. Baumeister finds employment with the Claflin Piano Company.

Nine years later in 1896, Charles starts his own piano manufacturing company and trains his two daughters, Hattie and Lillian.

In 1897, Charles introduces his “Orchestral Grand Model C”, a large upright piano which made a good seller for the company.

To grow the company Charles hires a salesman named Reinhard Kochman, who's job was to travel the country to boost up sales. This was a common practice and an effective method of advertising during this time.

In 1898, Charles, now semi-retiring, sells the company to his daughter Hattie and the name of the company changes to the H. Baumeister Co., This now probably makes this the first woman owned piano making company

In 1899 Hattie and Lillian decide to take a month long vacation. The company was well established by now and they had worked several years without any time off. They also used the opportunity to bolster sales in Europe.

By 1900, Kochmann files a breach of contract dispute against Hattie, claiming he lost the opportunity to earn contracts on 300 piano sales .. Hattie claimed that Kochmann demanded a $ 20 advance in the middle of his contract, which she refused, because there was no sales yet. Kochmann said that this stopped him from performing his part of the contract in full.

Hattie lost the court case but she won the appeal in 1902.

In 1907 the company again suffers from a fire, leaving most pianos destroyed by the fire, and the water to put it out with.

She was able again to rebuild the company, and she continued manufacturing pianos until around 1919.

During his retirement, Charles went to Los Angeles Ca. to partner with AM Salyer to start the Salyer-Baumeister piano Co.

Charles would later return to New York, where he died in 1925.

How to Pick a Great Band Name

There's nothing in a band name that makes a band great. If your music is great, your band could be named 'the Bloodfarts from Hell' and it will not make any difference. You will be a great band. (There's probably some kid reading this article right now thinking “dude! What a great name!”) Let me…

There's nothing in a band name that makes a band great. If your music is great, your band could be named 'the Bloodfarts from Hell' and it will not make any difference. You will be a great band. (There's probably some kid reading this article right now thinking “dude! What a great name!”)

Let me ask you this – Can you think of some great bands with terrible names? I know I can. But it's all subjective. I may say that name sucks and there's a thousand people who will agree with me and a thousand who will disagree. So what makes a band name great?

Your band name means nothing – and everything. I remember as a teenager going into a record store in New Jersey with 5 bucks in my pocket. In 1974 that was enough to buy a brand new record and pay the state of New Jersey their sales tax.

I bought an album by Camel (not to be confused with Frampton's Camel) the album was titled “Mirage”. Is not Camel a stupid name? I came to find out later Camel was a British band and British bands were my passion! It was their debut US album and it was phenomenal! I listened to that record a zillion times. You want to know the reason why I bought it? It was not because of their name. It was because they had a cool looking album cover! The cover was an airbrushed painting of a camel on some alien landscape that looked like jagged rock candy. The cover appeared to me so I took a chance. What a crap-shoot!

Now back to my point about bands with really sucky names. What's your opinion of 'Dead Can Dance'? 'Tears for Fears'? 'The Dead Kennedys'? Do you think any of these bands failed because of their stupid name? No! They were all phenomenally successful in spite of their name.

If you are the rare band with incredible music and a super name, take Pink Floyd as a prime example, you are golden. What makes Pink Floyd such a great name? It is simply the way it sounds and the imagination it conjures up, along with the fact that it is hard to forget. Let me repeat that if you just missed it. It is the way it sounds and the imagery it conjures up and the fact it is memorable.

Is the band name you have in mind memorable? There's a number of bands out there that have great music but their name seems to always elude me. Time and time again I ask 'who is this band? “Only to be told the name and guess what?

What about the image the name evokes? What is imagination anyway? It is simply the mental picture your mind creates when you think of something. Hopefully for a band looking for a name, the one you come up with will fill the void of someone's imagination and actually resonate with your audience.

So here's my two cents on choosing a band name. The name you choose should be clever and inspired. The cleverness will be what people remember, the imagination will come from your inspiration.

There's a story of a band who was told they were going to fail. Someone said “They'll sink like a lead zeppelin!” From that remark, 'Led Zeppelin' was created. The remark was their inspiration. Changing the lead to Led was clever. It made the name unique and easy to pronounce.

Musicians – please, do not use a band name generator unless you're just relying on chance to determine your name. By doing this you are removing the key element from a great band name. Inspiration. Start writing down names as the cosmic gods send them to you. Keep thinking about what your music is trying to say in words and those words will come to you, probably at the most inconvenient time.

Unique Hazards to Pianos in Knoxville Tennessee – Mold, Mildew, Humidity, Storage Units and Pests

Knoxville Tennessee, where I live, has an interest climate as far as pianos go. The humidity is quite variable and extreme and can wreak havoc on a piano. I have been keeping track of the humidity for about 2 years now, and I have been amazed how variable it is. Even in a single day,…

Knoxville Tennessee, where I live, has an interest climate as far as pianos go.

The humidity is quite variable and extreme and can wreak havoc on a piano. I have been keeping track of the humidity for about 2 years now, and I have been amazed how variable it is. Even in a single day, I have seen it go from very moist to very dry. In my piano restoration business, I have a refinishing booth, and the climatic conditions have to be within an acceptable temperature and humidity range if I do not want to have any spraying problems.

I have seen pianos left out in the garage or put in storage units. There is a deceptive mold problem in this part of the country and a piano with mold problems are pretty difficult to repair. Not only is the wood and felt stained with spores but the wood gets a smell that has an ammonia quality to it. Repairs like this are so expensive that in an old upright, it's not worth fixing in most cases. This is common with a lot of pianos I see on Craigslist too.

Two Examples:

I remember a Steinway Upright I restored last year, and I had to dismount the instrument down to its very basic parts. I cleaned and replaced every little spring, pin and bushing (several thousand pieces). I sanded all of the keys and cleaned the entire piano with a biocide. I can not even remember having to dismantle a piano down to its basic elements like this in the last 20 years.

Same thing with a Yamaha Grand Piano I am currently working on. This piano was apparently in a storage unit (not climate controlled) and an animal had made this piano into its home. This piano is so arranged with urine that again every single tiny piece of the piano will have to be dismantled and cleaned. In a grand piano there are over 8 thousand parts. So this will be an expensive repair.

Ideally, the piano in a home should be in a climate controlled environment without any direct sunlight beaming on it. The piano should also be on some kind of regular maintenance schedule as well.

I also would recommend keeping a humidity gauge near the piano and keeping a diary of the changes. This will tell you what measures, if any, you have to take. Again ideally, you want the humidity to be a constant percentage year round, not fluctuating up and down.

If you are concerned about keeping good care of your piano, knowing the moisture conditions from day to day is a good start along with regular maintenance from an expert.

The Short History of the Chickering Brothers Piano Company

The Chickering brothers, out of Chicago, was a short lived piano making company from the early 1900's. Even though they were in business for such a short time, they made up for it by creating one of the best pianos ever made, in my opinion, called -The Acoustigrande. The patent reveals that they changed the…

The Chickering brothers, out of Chicago, was a short lived piano making company from the early 1900's. Even though they were in business for such a short time, they made up for it by creating one of the best pianos ever made, in my opinion, called -The Acoustigrande.

The patent reveals that they changed the angle of the spine of the piano to create a larger soundboard in width. The magic was that it did not look bigger.

Chickering Brothers, which should not be confused with the Chickering & Sons Piano Company from Boston. The Chickerings from both firms were related to one another, and Clifford Chickering had even worked at the Chickering and Sons factory for seven years, before starting his own firm.

He was called upon to finish a drawing that Frank Chickering (Uncle and owner of Chickering & Sons) was working on before his death. Clifford incorporated a couple of innovations into the drawing that directed in the Acoustigrande.

Beside width, it also features a new way of tapering the rim to match the tapering of the soundboard to improve the tone.

Clifford became very skilled in piano acoustics, and he decides to branch out onto his own and he move to Chicago with his brothers.

Tragedy after next befalls Clifford, his brother Fred dies, then Wallace too, and at the same time the city of Chicago condemns the Chickering building for street widening. All while fighting with his uncles firm over use of the Chickering Name in relation to piano making.

He ends up selling his company to Ampico and also ends up returning to Chickering and Sons to become their Vice President.

Clifford was a major force in keeping the Chickering and Sons Piano Company going strong after Frank Chickering died. But due to economic conditions of the oncoming of World War 1 the firm calls it quits in 1908 selling to Ampico. Ampico took good advantage of the use and rights of the Chickering name but the pianos were a less expensive version. I have also seen a Chickering Brothers piano produced by Ampico and this too was a very inexpensive version, and not worthy of the original design

If you ever come across, or own an Original Chickering Brothers piano, please know that it was a very special design and is very much worth restoring.

It is one of the few pianos from the past that I have come across that was better than most pianos made today.